​Nature Moncton March Meeting.
Date: March 20, 2018.
Time: 7:00pm.
Location: Mapleton Park Rotary Lodge (across from Cabela’s)
Speaker: Laura Tranquilla.

Wetlands provide a vast array of ecosystem services. Unfortunately, wetlands have been rapidly declining in number, size, and quality throughout North America. Those that remain are threatened by pollution, filling, draining, and other human impacts. Many marsh-dependent species have been affected, and are in need of monitoring, protection, and recovery efforts.

Help NB Community Harvest Gardens bring farming back as a viable career choice in New Brunswick.  The Hayes Urban Teaching Farm pilot program is set to launch this Spring 2018. 

Farming practices taught will be regenerative, human-scale and relationship-based, positively impacting:
  • Climate change
  • Meaningful job creation
  • Food security & food sovereignty
  • Revitalization of our urban & rural communities

Village of Gagetown Adopts Declaration of Environmental Rights
written by Voices for Sustainable Environments and Communities

On Monday Jan 15th, about 20 citizens turned out on a snowy wintery evening for the Village of Gagetown Council meeting, held at the Village Rec Council. They were there to see the Village Council issue its Environmental Rights Declaration in support of the Blue Dot movement. Blue Dot is an initiative of the David Suzuki Foundation that works toward the right to a healthy environment for all Canadians.

Le RENB sollicite des propositions pour :

1. Un nouveau look pour notre site-Web
2. Calculatrice interactive de risques et de bienfaits en ligne (et Appendice)

La date limite pour les propositions est le 29 janvier 2018.
IMG 3499

A leak of a highly-flammable gas at Irving Oil’s operations forced roughly 65 people from their homes in an east Saint John neighbourhood on Monday, Jan. 8.

The CBC reported on the butane leak at Irving Oil’s Saint John East Terminal after the company announced on Twitter that it had discovered the rupture during “routine testing.”

As of Wednesday morning, the residents from roughly 30 homes over four streets still could not return home.

Today until Jan. 19 we are putting the vote to you! We visited five beautiful places in New Brunswick as part of our #MyNatureNB photo and storytelling contest, now we need your help to choose your favourite!!

Visit http://www.naturenb.ca/mynaturenb-photo-and-storytelling-c…/ and vote for the video/photo/story you like the best. You can vote once per day!!This project was funded by the Government of Canada*****************
D’aujourd’hui jusqu’au 19 janvier nous vous demandons de voter! Nous avons visité cinq endroits magnifiques au Nouveau-Brunswick comme partie de notre concours de photos et d’histoires #MaNatureNB, et nous avons maintenant besoin de votre aide afin de choisir le lieu gagnant!Visitez http://www.naturenb.ca/manaturenb-concours/ et votez pour le vidéo/ la photo /l’histoire que vous préférez. Vous pouvez voter une fois par jour !!Ce projet a été financé par le Gouvernement du Canada.
Attention News Editors: Lois Corbett, Executive Director, released the following statement with respect to today’s announcement about a provincial water strategy:

“The provincial water strategy released today includes short-term and long-term actions that demonstrate what can happen when citizens and groups like the Conservation Council speak up for clean water.

Introducing a new water protection act over the next two years — legislation that will both make watershed protection action plans mandatory and legally enforceable and set science-based water quality standards — is a big move, and a smart one.

The commitment to develop a coastal protection regulation over the next few months that would protect wetlands, estuaries and important coastal habitat like eelgrass stands out for me, and it is an important step to protect towns and villages all along the Northumberland Strait.

Adding a recreational water monitoring program for all provincial parks — slated to be ready for summer 2018 — will protect young and old swimmers who cool off in our favourite places like Parlee Beach and the Mactaquac headpond.

With this strategy, New Brunswick is one step closer to having the modern protections we need to ensure the health of our communities and waters, including our beloved beaches, rivers, lakes, streams, bays, wetlands and drinking water supplies.”

The development of the provincial water strategy was informed by recommendations from the Technical Working Group on Watershed Management. Lois Corbett participated in the working group since its formation in 2017.Recommended links:
Édition spéciale du NB Naturalist bientôt disponible!


Nous sommes heureux de vous informer que nous publions un numéro spécial de notre magazine, le NB Naturalist, sur la Nature, la Biodiversité et les Changements Climatiques. Le magazine est gratuit et prêt à être envoyé par la poste d'ici la fin du mois de novembre.  Nous aimerions le rendre disponible dans toute la province, veuillez nous faire savoir si vous êtes intéressés à contribuer à la distribution dans votre région. L'édition est entièrement traduite. Veuillez remplir le formulaire ici : https://goo.gl/forms/IdGVeuUJQOwBqj8o2.Si vous avez des questions, n'hésitez pas à nous contacter: 506-459-4209

 

 

 

Vol 44 No 3 Nov 2017 P1 3

 

CCNB logo HR
FREDERICTON —
 Lois Corbett, Executive Director, issued the following statement regarding today’s announcement about climate change legislation. She is available for comment.

“I’m pleased the province has followed the Conservation Council’s advice, and that of the Auditor General, by enshrining climate change targets in law. It is not clear, however, that climate fund the bill sets up will go far enough to protect the health and safety of New Brunswick families and communities already suffering from extreme ice storms, hurricanes and flooding caused by climate change.

There are no new incentives, financial or otherwise, to innovate, reduce pollution or change behaviours. By toeing the status quo, the government has missed its goal of helping N.B. transition to a low-carbon economy and create jobs.

It is an uninspiring follow-up to last December’s climate change action plan, which was a smart road map for climate action and job creation that was among the best in the country. And I sorely doubt it will meet the bar set by the federal government.

Instead, we have legislation that largely maintains the status quo and sets us on a race to the bottom when it comes to protecting the health and safety of New Brunswickers and taking advantage of the economic opportunities that come with ambitious climate action.

There are some good things in the bill: it requires the Minister to report on how the money in the Climate Change Fund is spent every year; it requires the government to report annually on the progress of its Climate Change Action Plan; and it enshrines in law the government’s carbon pollution reduction targets.”

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Recommended Links: To arrange an interview, contact:Jon MacNeill, Communications Director, 238-3539 (m) | 458-8747 (w) | jon.macneill@conservationcouncil.ca
CCNB logo HRAttention News Editors: Here is some background that may be helpful in reporting on Environment and Local Government Minister Serge Rousselle’s comments today about a carbon-pricing system for New Brunswick:
  • To date, Canadian jurisdictions that have announced or implemented a system for pricing carbon include Newfoundland and Labrador, Nova Scotia, Quebec, Ontario, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta, British Columbia, and, now, New Brunswick.
  • In June 2017, New Brunswick’s Auditor General delivered a substantive review of the province’s climate change plan, including recommendations to turn policy intentions into on-the-ground work to protect homes and communities from what she called “one of the greatest challenges for communities, governments and corporations in the coming decades.” Among other things, the review called for an aggressive timeline and full details on how the government plans to execute the 118 actions laid out in its Climate Change Action Plan.
  • New Brunswick’s Climate Change Action Plan, released in December 2016, contained all the elements for effective climate action in N.B., including commitments to Premier-led governance, target-driven policies, and sources of funding to support programs for low-income families, homeowners, and industry. It also included several measures called for by the Legislative Select Committee on Climate Change, including legislating carbon pollution reduction targets and energy-efficiency improvement targets, and phasing out coal from electricity production and phasing in more renewable energy like solar, wind, biomass and hydro.
  • One month after the climate change plan was released, New Brunswickers experienced a sobering example of climate change impacts at home with the January 2017 ice storm that led to two people dying from carbon monoxide poisoning and nearly 300,000 homes and businesses left without power, some for up to 13 days. NB Power estimates the damages to its infrastructure at $30-million, making it the most expensive restoration in the utility's history.
  • New Brunswickers are keenly aware that climate change is already happening in their communities in the forms of more extreme ice storms, hurricanes and flooding events. The Ice Storm Review 2017, released in August 2017, provided a snapshot of climate change-related extreme weather events in New Brunswick, including but not limited to:
    • Hurricane Arthur in July 2014, which brought torrential rains and 100-km/hour winds that caused road closures and washouts and significant infrastructure damages across the province. The total damages were estimated at $12.5 million.
    • A Nor-easter in December 2014 which impacted 56 roads with flooding or washouts across several regions, with impacts primarily concentrated in the Moncton region. Damages totalled $10.3 million.
    • Extreme flooding and storm surges in December 2010 which resulted in $13.8 million in damages from flooding in Charlotte and York Counties, and $3 million in damages associated with storm surges affecting the east and northeast coasts of the province.

Jon MacNeill
Communications DirectorConservation Council of New Brunswick/
Conseil de conservation du Nouveau-Brunswick
458-8747 | 238-3539
Le 7 décembre, 23 groupes ont signé une déclaration sur l'économie à faible carbone.  Pour lire la déclaration complète, cliquez ici

La déclaration demande au gouvernement du Nouveau-Brunswick de :
  • adopter l’établissement de l’économie à faible carbone comme la base pour une économie plus stable et résiliente, commençant en 2018;
  • inclure des mesures de protection transparentes prévenant la possibilité de cacher ou de fausser les émissions de carbone et les figures de crédits de carbone;
  • Assurer les succès en refusant les mesures de neutralité de revenu, la tarification basée sur la valeur et autres mesures de retombement des groupes d’intérêt des consommateurs et des corporations;
  • Ne pas permettre de période de grâce pour la pleine implémentation du programme de taxe sur le programme, ni de donner de crédits plutôt que de les vendre aux industries qui polluent sous le régime de plafonnement et d’échange;
  • Investir et réinvestir tous les revenus de la taxe provinciale sur le carbone dans l’énergie propre, le transport et l’infrastructure propre ainsi que l’efficacité énergétique.
La déclaration fut signée par:
Association for the protection of marshes and beaches at l'Aboiteau
Citizens Coalition for Clean Air – Saint-Jean, N-B
Concerned Citizens of Saint John
Conseil des canadiens – Chapitre Atlantique
Conseil des canadiens – Chapitre du Comté de Kent
Department of Geography and Environment, Mount Allison University
Développement durable de Bathurst
East Brûlé Citizens for Protected Wetlands and Beaches 
Esgenoopetitj Watershed Association
Feu Vert – Grand-Sault, N-B
Fondation Sierra Club du Canada – Section du Canada Atlantique
Friends of Rockwood Park, INC. – Saint-Jean, N-B
NB Anti-Shale Gas Alliance
New Brunswickers Against Fracking – Doaktown, N-B
OCIA Atlantic
PEACE-NB
Recherche Indépendante de Retraité en Écologie
Red Dot Association of Shediac Bay
Sustainable Energy Group - Woodstock, N-B
Taymouth Environmental Action
University of New Brunswick Saint John Green Society
Voices for Sustainable Environments and Communities – Village deGagetown, N-B
West/Ouest Brûlé Ltd.
2017 Lieutenant-Governor’s Award of Excellence in Land Conservation Winner Announced


Fredericton, New Brunswick (Nov 29, 2017) – Dr. James (Jim) Goltz, a renowned veterinary pathologist, Manager of Veterinary Laboratory Services for the New Brunswick Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Aquaculture, and dedicated volunteer naturalist has been honoured with the Lieutenant-Governor’s Award for Excellence in Land Conservation. Dr. Goltz’s dedication to supporting conservation organizations in New Brunswick has made a significant impact on the progress of land conservation efforts in our beautiful province.

"I am delighted to recognize the long and dedicated work of Dr. Jim Goltz, "says Lt-Gov Jocelyne Roy Vienneau. "He serves as an inspiration for everyone try‎ing to make a 'green' difference. His is a wonderful New Brunswick story from which we can all learn."

A true leader in the conservation field in our province, Dr. Goltz has been an active field botanist for nearly 30 years, with a special interest in the flora of New Brunswick. From nature walks, to sitting on committees, and caring for natural areas, his enthusiasm in the conservation field continues to make a significant impact today. As a dedicated volunteer for the Nature Trust of New Brunswick, Jim has led nature walks at preserve openings, stewarded nature preserves by monitoring rare species of flora and fauna, and continues to provide advice regarding species identification and management activities. Jim is always willing to share his wisdom. These are just a small testament to Jim’s long history as a conservationist.

“For such a small province, New Brunswick has an incredibly rich biodiversity with many natural history wonders worthy of protection and global recognition. Soon after I moved here in the mid-1980s, I fell in love with the province, especially the beautiful river valleys, magnificent forests, spectacular wetlands and diverse coastlines, and the many wild plants and animals that reside here.” Says Dr. Goltz, “The province’s strong reliance on natural resources continues to put tremendous pressure on the landscapes and wildlife, including plants and animals, that human residents of the province and visitors so deeply cherish and take for granted.  It’s a profound and humbling  honour to be recognized among the cadre of dedicated conservationists who are working tirelessly to preserve the species and natural ecosystems of this province.  I am especially delighted to witness amazing progress in protecting the Appalachian Hardwood Forest remnants in the St. John River Valley, thanks to the Nature Trust of New Brunswick, the Meduxnekeag River Association, the Nature Conservancy of Canada and the communities and many people who support them.”

“On behalf of the Nature Trust of New Brunswick, our team would like to extend a congratulations to Dr. Goltz. His considerable work in conservation in New Brunswick makes Jim an excellent recipient for this year’s award.” Says Vince Zelazny, President of the Nature Trust of New Brunswick, “Jim can identify a very long list of birds, amphibians, reptiles, butterflies, moths, and is without a doubt among the most hard-working and well-rounded field naturalists in Canada. We are pleased to join our Honorary Patron, The Honourable Jocelyne Roy Vienneau, to give thanks to those who contribute so much to the excellent work being done in land conservation in our province.”

“With top-notch credentials, expert knowledge of botany and ornithology, and a passion for exploration, he could have pursued his professional career, and made his home and name as a naturalist, in any part of Canada or elsewhere. He chose New Brunswick. Perhaps it was love at first sight—I don’t know. But clearly, he soon fell for the place and people here. He realized that, for an area of its size, New Brunswick has a remarkably varied and interesting natural environment.” Says Stephen Clayden, Curator at the New Brunswick Museum and Jim’s longtime friend, “In short order he got to know naturalists and others around the province, and became widely known and admired for his extraordinary generosity. He has freely shared his expert knowledge of flora and fauna, led countless outings, and lent his time and organizational skills to many groups and projects.”

“Each and every nature foray here still evokes for me an incredible sense of awe and wonder.  Through leading nature forays, sharing my enthusiasm for nature and showing people photographs of nature’s treasures, I hope that others will be inspired to learn more about nature, do whatever they can to pass on their love and knowledge, and translate these into conservation actions.  I very much appreciate New Brunswick’s scientists, naturalists, outdoor enthusiasts and other experts who continue to graciously and generously share their wealth of knowledge with me and others, feeding our insatiable curiosity to learn more about the world around us.” Says Dr. Goltz.

Dr. Goltz will be awarded the Lieutenant-Governor’s Award for Excellence in Land Conservation by the Honourable Jocelyne Roy Vienneau at Government House in Fredericton on Wednesday, November 28th during the annual award ceremony.

About the Award
The Lieutenant-Governor’s Award for Excellence in Land Conservation was established in 2012 to mark the 25th anniversary of the Nature Trust of New Brunswick. Previous recipients of the award have included the late Mary Majka, the Meduxnekeag River Association, Roberta Clowater, and the late Don Dennison. As the Honorary Patron of the Nature Trust of New Brunswick, Lieutenant-Governor Jocelyne Roy Vienneau, presents the annual award in recognition of an individual or organization that has made significant contributions to the protection of natural heritage through stewardship, volunteerism, donation of lands or building effective partnerships. In 2015, the Donald G. Dennison Nature Trust of New Brunswick Legacy Fund was created from memorial donations to the Nature Trust following Don’s death from cancer. His family established the Legacy Fund in Don’s honour. 

About the Nature Trust of New Brunswick
Established in 1987, the Nature Trust of New Brunswick is a registered charitable land conservation organization dedicated to preserving the province’s ecologically significant landscapes. To date, the Nature Trust has conserved over 7,000 acres (2,700 hectares) in more than 50 beautiful and diverse nature preserves in New Brunswick. For more information, visit www.naturetrust.nb.ca.
Le RENB est heureux d’être le partenaire local pour ÉcoNous 2018, la conférence annuelle du Réseau canadien de développement économique communautaire, qui aura lieu à Moncton en septembre 2018.
ECONOUS LOGOS 2018 w tag

Axé sur le développement économique communautaire vert, ÉcoNous2018 réunira des conférenciers/ères de renom, des sessions dynamiques et des opportunités de réseautage à propos des Personnes (communautés inclusives), de la Planète (environnements durables) et de l'Économie (prospérité locale) ainsi que ces différents éléments qui créent une économie au service de tous.Qui ou quoi devrait être sur l’ordre du jour?  Faites connaitre vos idées au comité de planification ici : https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/V226TJX
(St. Andrews, NB) The Nature Trust of New Brunswick has been presented with another opportunity to extend the iconic Caughey-Taylor Nature Preserve in Bocabec, near St. Andrews.

The beautiful 600-acre Caughey-Taylor Nature Preserve features more than 9 km of hiking trails that lead through various ecosystems and forests. This preserve is enjoyed year-round by hikers, kayakers, and snowshoers. The Nature Trust is currently in the final stages of acquiring a 12.5-acre extension that will provide a buffer to the Sam Orr’s Pond and allow for the extension of the nature trail.

The J T Clark Family Foundation has generously pledged to match any further donations to the Nature Trust’s fundraising campaign, up to $3500. “We are very thankful for the continued support from the Clark Foundation.” says Nature Trust President, Vince Zelazny. “The Clark Foundation has supported many other nature preserve acquisitions in the past. We are excited to continue this partnership and secure this important extension at Caughey-Taylor Nature Preserve, and ask the public to help the Nature Trust reach its fundraising goal for this important extension.”

Caughey-Taylor Nature Preserve is designated under the Protected Natural Areas Act, which provides the highest level of protection possible and helps to support the diverse wildlife that seek refuge in the rich wetlands and forests. In addition to providing crucial habitat for wildlife, the preserve sees hundreds of visitors each year. “Caughey-Taylor is truly a gem in the Bay of Fundy area.” says Caughey Taylor Nature Preserve volunteer and Board member, Walter Emrich. “With an extensive trail system, visitors to the preserve are taken through various ecosystems and breathtaking lookouts as they make their way to Berry Point, the last stop on the trail.”

The Nature Trust has pushed the property closing date to December, and needs support from the community to complete this extension. Donations to the fundraising campaign can be made online via Chuffed at https://chuffed.org/project/caughey-taylor-extension or by calling the Nature Trust office at (506) 457 2398.

Caughey-Taylor Nature Preserve can be found on Route 127 in Bocabec, 12 km north of St. Andrews. You can learn more about Caughey-Taylor Nature Preserve by visiting www.naturetrust.nb.ca. If you have any questions about Caughey-Taylor Nature Preserve or the fundraising campaign, please contact Renata at renata.woodward@ntnb.org.

About the Nature Trust of New Brunswick

Established in 1987, the Nature Trust of New Brunswick is a registered charitable conservation organization dedicated to preserving the province’s ecologically significant landscapes. To date, the Nature Trust has conserved over 2,830 hectares (7,000 acres) in 50 beautiful and diverse nature preserves in New Brunswick. For more information, visit www.naturetrust.nb.ca.
Le weekend dernier, lors du rassemblement Éco-Confluence, le RENB a lancé son nouveau logo !
logo 1

La violette représente l’emblème floral du Nouveau-Brunswick et son environnement.  Le centre est le réseau qui nous rassemble tous.

Ce logo a été conçu par Annika Chiasson, coordonnatrice des communications au RENB et talentueuse graphiste.

October 31, 2017
(For immediate release)

Fredericton, NEW BRUNSWICK. A retired research scientist for the Canadian gov­ern­ment and expert on genetically modified foods, Dr. Thierry Vrain, will be in New Brunswick between October 30 and November 2, 2017, where he will be presenting his findings to the public in four communities: St. Louis-de-Kent, Edmundston, Petitcodiac and Fredericton Junction.

Dr. Vrain worked for 30 years as a research sci­en­tist for the Canadian gov­ern­ment in Québec and British Columbia where he con­ducted research on genet­i­cally mod­i­fied pota­toes, among other projects. In British Columbia, Dr. Vrain was section Head of the Biotechnology and Nematology sections at the Pacific Agri-Food Research Centre (Agriculture Canada) in Summerland.

The most common genetically engineered crops have been modified to be resistant to glyphosate-based herbicides such as Monsanto’s Round-Up, and this has been a major focus of Dr. Vrain’s work. For the past decade, he has been travelling the world to inform the public of the unacceptable risks that glyphosate poses to human health and the environment.

In New Brunswick glyphosate-based herbicides are widely sprayed on agricultural land and on forests or softwood plantations to kill off hardwoods that might complete with conifers planted for pulp and other low-value wood products.

Dr. Vrain’s visit could not be more timely. The subject of herbicide spraying on public forests and on NB Power right-of-ways is garnering a great deal of public attention and provoking widespread protest, spearheaded by the work of the Stop Spraying NB movement (Facebook Group: Stop Spraying in New Brunswick).

In recent years, glyphosate has come under a great deal of scrutiny world-wide. In 2015, the World Health Organization’s research arm labelled glyphosate a “probable carcinogen” and in 2017, a long-term study published in Science Reports linked “chronic ultra-low dose” exposure to glyphosate-based herbicides with liver disease in rats.  The same year documents unsealed by court order in the United States revealed collusion between an official in the Environmental Protection Agency and Monsanto to falsify academic reports and stifle others to give glyphosate-based herbicides a clean bill of health. More recently, California has added glyphosate to its list of cancer-causing agents that must come with a warning label. 

In New Brunswick, a number of municipalities, including Moncton, Cap Pelé, Tracadie, Miscou, Tide Head, Paquetville, Sackville and community groups such as the Saint-Quentin and Cap Pelée/Beaubassin-Est Chambers of Commerce, have publicly expressed their support of the Stop Spraying NB movement by either sending letters of concern to provincial government or signing a resolution against spraying in our forests and under NB Power lines.

The movement to stop pesticide spraying in New Brunswick on public lands and under NB Power lines is rapidly gaining momentum. Signs calling for an end to the spraying are popping up all over New Brunswick. At the Union of Municipalities Tradeshow on September 29, 2017, municipal politicians and staff noted that, “there are signs everywhere.”

More than 35,000 people have already signed a petition to stop the spraying, with more coming in every day. Citizens of this province are growing more and more aware of the immense value of their diverse Acadian forests, their wildlife, their drinking water, their rivers and lakes, forest foods, and their health. They are demanding a ban on the spraying of herbicide on their woodlands.

Dr. Vrain’s presentations are of utmost importance, focusing as they do on the research that Health Canada is choosing to ignore, the negative effects of glyphosate residue in and on edible plants, including the berries, mushrooms, medicinal plants that NB citizens gather in our forests, and which wildlife depend on for their survival.

Dr. Thierry Vrain’s public presentations are being hosted and funded by local community groups, together with a number of grassroots organizations that are listed below, and will help the public become better informed about scientific knowledge on long-term, low-dose exposure to glyphosate.

Wednesday, November 1, 7-9 pm
Maritime Motorsports Hall of fame
Petitcodiac, NB
(Organized in collaboration with SSNB Inc.)

Thursday, November 2, 7-9 pm
Royal Canadian Legion Branch 55
159 Sunbury Drive
Fredericton Junction, NB
(Organized in collaboration with The Right Not To Be Poisoned)

CONTACTS:
(English) Dr. Caroline Lubbe-D'Arcy (Chair, SSNB Inc.): 506-292-7503 email: caroline@stopsprayingnb.ca www.stopsprayingnb.ca
(English) Morris Shannon (Right not to be Poisoned): (506) 455-4232 email: 245tmo@gmail.com
(French)  Francine Levesque (Écovie): 506-284-2769  email: canot@explornet.ca

Pour diffusion immédiate
30 octobre 2017

Samedi le 28 octobre 2017, un prix environnemental a été attribué à des citoyens du Nouveau-Brunswick pour souligner leurs services exemplaires à leur collectivité. 

La Red Head Anthony’s Cove Preservation Association été honorée par le prix Phénix « en reconnaissance de leur engagement inébranlable voué à la défense de leur communauté, qui fut à la base de leur réussite à contrer la menace d'un important développement industriel. »  Le prix Phénix est accordé annuellement pour ceux et celles qui ont consacré leurs efforts aux politiques et à la législation et qui ont été dans le feu de l’action.

La ferme de réservoirs et le terminal portuaire de l’Oléoduc Énergie Est étaient censés être construit à Red Head à Saint-Jean Est.  Les inquiétudes concernant les impacts environnementaux de ce projet sur leur communauté et sur les communautés à travers le et sur la baie de Fundy a incité les résidents locaux à s’organiser contre l’Oléoduc Énergie Est.  Grâce à leurs efforts, et à ceux de plusieurs autres, le long de l’oléoduc planifié, la proposition d’Énergie Est a été retiré par TransCanada plus tôt ce mois-ci.

Raissa Marks, directrice générale du Réseau environnemental du Nouveau-Brunswick, a loué les efforts de la Red Head Anthony’s Cove Preservation Association.  « Cette association a impressionné plusieurs personnes faisant partie du mouvement environnemental et plusieurs autres aussi.  Elle a démontré que des citoyens dévoués et laborieux peuvent résister à de grandes entreprises, bâtir des alliances et ressortir de grands défis plus forts et plus unis.  Les résidents de Red Head étaient situés au bout de l’oléoduc, mais ils ont démontré que peu importe l’endroit où l'on se trouve, se tenir debout faire une différence. 

Le prix a été présenté lors de la réunion annuelle du Réseau environnemental du Nouveau-Brunswick, Éco-confluence, qui a eu lieu à Fredericton la fin de semaine passée.  Chaque année, les efforts importants déployés par les citoyens et les groupes de citoyens pour protéger et restaurer l’environnement au Nouveau-Brunswick sont reconnu durant une cérémonie spéciale. 


Le Réseau environnemental du Nouveau-Brunswick est un réseau de communication sans but lucratif comprenant plus de 100 groupes environnementaux de citoyens et de citoyennes de toutes les régions de la province.  Le but du Réseau est d’encourager les communications et la collaboration parmi les groupes et entre les groups, le gouvernement et d’autres secteurs.

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Award Presentation Gordon Lynaya for web

Photo: Gordon Dalzell, Citizens Coalition for Clean Air, qui a présenté le prix Phénix 2017 à Lynaya Astephen, Red Head Anthony's Cove Preservation Association.  Crédit: Pascale Ouellette

(Fredericton, N.-B.) Partout au Nouveau-Brunswick, des organisations locales appuient la conservation de la biodiversité en préparant des projets de recherches, de restauration et d’éducation, qui engagent les gens des collectivités.  Les membres de ces organisations sont passionnés par la promotion et la protection de la diversité biologique de notre magnifique province.  Plusieurs de ces initiatives seront présentées durant la nouvelle campagne 30 Jours de biodiversité, qui durera tout le mois d’octobre.  Le Collectif pour la biodiversité au Nouveau-Brunswick s’occupera de la promotion d’une activité par jour sur les médias sociaux et sur différents sites Web.

« Nous avons la chance d’avoir au Nouveau-Brunswick un riche patrimoine naturel, » fait remarquer Nadine Ives du Conseil de conservation du Nouveau-Brunswick.  « Les Néobrunswickois se soucient de la nature et c’est formidable qu’il y ait tant de groupes et de personnes qui partagent cette passion pour les espèces et leurs habitats et qui travaillent fort pour les connaitre et les protéger.  Nous sommes ravis de pouvoir présenter des initiatives très intéressantes durant les 30 Jour de biodiversité. »  Vous pouvez retrouver toutes ces initiatives ici : http://nben.ca/fr/initiatives-biodiversite-nouveau-brunswick.

Durant ces 30 Jours de biodiversité, des initiatives provenant de plus de 20 organisations seront présentées.  Par exemple, le programme des patrouilleurs des plantes envahissantes de l’Alliance des associations de lacs qui cible la prévention des nouvelles introductions et de la propagation d’espèces de plantes exogènes.  Ces envahisseurs peuvent détruire des habitats, et causer la perte de communautés animales et végétales et d’autres problèmes encore.  Un autre programme, offert par Nature N.-B. depuis 2016, a publié des guides pour les enfants qui leur permettent d’identifier des oiseaux, des grenouilles, des arbres et d’autres plantes de leur propre environnement.  Toutes ces activités se déroulent en anglais ou en français, et ces guides sont gratuits pour tous les enfants du Nouveau-Brunswick.

Ce ne sont que deux des nombreuses initiatives pour la biodiversité de notre province.  Les groupes environnementaux, les groupes communautaires, les chercheurs, et tous les autres intéressés sont encouragés à soumettre leurs initiatives pour qu’elles soient présentées, ici: http://nben.ca/fr/initiatives-biodiversite-nouveau-brunswick

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Concernant la biodiversité: la diversité biologique, ou en bref, la biodiversité, se réfère à la variété de toutes les formes de vie, ainsi que les écosystèmes et les processus naturels qui les soutiennent.  La province du Nouveau-Brunswick possède une stratégie provinciale qui porte sur la conservation de la biodiversité et l’utilisation des ressources biologiques d’une manière durable.  La stratégie provinciale s’accorde avec la Stratégie canadienne pour la biodiversité qui a été mise en place pour appuyer les obligations du Canada envers la Convention sur la diversité biologique des Nations-Unies, qui comprend un plan stratégique pour la biodiversité, incluant les cibles de la biodiversité d’Aichi, pour la période 2011-2020.

Concernant le Collectif pour la biodiversité au Nouveau-Brunswick : Le collectif pour la biodiversité au Nouveau-Brunswick est un effort de divers intéressés pour s’occuper de la protection de la biodiversité et des espèces en péril.  Le but du collectif est de travailler en collaboration pour renforcer les activités de surveillance sur le terrain et fournir une approche complète pour la protection de la biodiversité dans la province.  Les agences concernées sont très variées; la collaboration rassemble les citoyens de la conservation et les groupes environnementaux, les gouvernements fédéral, provincial et municipaux, des professeurs et des chercheurs, des planificateurs urbains et ruraux et des entreprises qui travaillent dans un esprit de coopération.

Contact:

Raissa Marks, Réseau environnemental du Nouveau-Brunswick, raissa.marks@nben.ca | 506-855-4144
Conservation on Canvas, an Exhibition of paintings of New Brunswick’s Nature Trust Nature Preserves by artist Michael McEwing, opens at the New Brunswick Museum on October 5th



(Saint John, NB) - In celebration of the Nature Trust of New Brunswick’s 30th anniversary, Conservation on Canvas, an exhibition of paintings featuring Nature Trust of New Brunswick Nature Preserves by New Brunswick artist and art educator Michael McEwing opens at the New Brunswick Museum on Thursday, 5 October 2017, from 5-7 PM.  The exhibition, a partnership between the Nature Trust of New Brunswick and the New Brunswick Museum showcases the natural beauty of New Brunswick.  A series of 33 oil paintings captures unique ecosystems and landscapes of Nature Trust preserves from around the province. The exhibition will travel throughout New Brunswick in 2018, and will be accompanied by art-in-nature workshops, immersing visitors in the natural wonders that surround us in our beautiful province.

The project began nearly four years ago, when Michael McEwing approached the Nature Trust with the idea to capture the beauty of Nature Trust preserves on canvas. “Early on, it began to dawn on me that this project would become about more than just exploring and painting nature preserves,” says McEwing, “it has become just as much about the incredible people who have joined me on the journey. The inspiration and knowledge that has been shared from the Nature Trust board members, staff, and volunteers is now embedded in the works themselves--a merger of artistic expression and passion for the biodiversity of nature."

Featuring preserves from Grand Manan and Blacks Harbour in the lower Bay of Fundy, to Shea Lake in the North, the Conservation on Canvas exhibition is a diverse showcase of New Brunswick’s landscapes and biodiversity. McEwing explains; “This series invites the viewer to join me on this adventure of discovering the wide diversity and unique ecology of these outstanding nature preserves.”  The goal of the project is to raise awareness of the natural diversity across New Brunswick, and to celebrate land conservation as a means of ensuring these landscapes and habitat remain protected for future generations.

“The Nature Trust is proud to be continuing our partnership with the New Brunswick Museum and the art community.” says Vice President of the Nature Trust’s Board, Wayne Burley, “it has been a joy to see these paintings take shape, depicting the varying landscapes of our province, and leaving a legacy like the nature preserves they represent. The community has rallied behind this project from day one, and have supported the art-in-nature workshops we’ve hosted.”  Burley has been involved with the project as an advisor since it began.

“Our province’s landscape has been the subject of many artists’ work for over two and a half centuries – Michael McEwing’s  focused attention captures a beauty that is worthy of both our attention and our preservation efforts,“ states Peter Larocque, New Brunswick Museum Art Curator. “The New Brunswick Museum is very pleased to continue our longstanding collaboration with the Nature Trust of New Brunswick and to help share the ongoing exploration of the province’s natural beauty and to showcase the talent of its contemporary artists.”

The exhibition will remain at the New Brunswick Museum until mid-January 2018.  It will travel then travel to the Andrew & Laura McCain Art Gallery in Florenceville-Bristol, the Sunbury Shores Arts & Nature Centre in Saint Andrews and the Grand Manan Art Gallery and the Grand Manan Museum.  The exhibition tour will conclude at Government House in Fredericton in fall 2018. Art-in-nature workshops and guided excursions on nearby nature preserves will accompany the exhibition at each location, led by McEwing, fellow artists, and naturalists, that will allow guests to deepen their knowledge of local biodiversity and create their own masterpieces.

All are welcome to join the artist and representatives of the organizing partners at the free exhibition opening at the New Brunswick Museum on October 5th at 5-7 PM.

Financial support for this project has also been graciously given by TD, McCain Foods, Stewart McKelvey and other supporters.

For more information:

Caitlin Griffiths or Aristi Dsilva, Communications & Marketing, New Brunswick Museum
(506) 654-7059 or (506) 643-2358
info@nbm-mnb.ca

Curtis Richardson, Communications Coordinator, Nature Trust of New Brunswick
(506) 457-2398
curtis.richardson@ntnb.org
Nature Trust to host AGM and Nature Walk on Mapleton Acadian Forest Nature Preserve

(Elgin, NB) On Sunday, October 1st from 1 to 4 pm, the Nature Trust of New Brunswick will host its Annual General Meeting at the Maple Tree Café in Elgin, New Brunswick. With the recent protection of the Mapleton Acadian Forest Nature Preserve in the community, the annual general meeting will be accompanied by a nature walk. Nature Trust supporters, volunteers and members will have the opportunity to meet, as well as reflect and discuss plans for the future of the organization.

“As the Nature Trust continues to celebrate its 30th anniversary celebrations, we are gearing up to begin our strategic planning sessions,” says Nature Trust President Vince Zelazny. “We have spent this summer engaging with members of communities throughout New Brunswick to learn what area of our organization is most important to them. We plan on using the data we’ve collected to help guide us during our planning.”

The Nature Trust has had a very successful year in 2016/17, conserving three new nature preserves, extending three existing preserves, and renewing a lease. The three new preserves were the Mapleton Acadian Forest Nature Preserve in Elgin, the Nelekwenekek Nature Preserve on Middle Island, and the Bonney Nature Preserve on the Kingston Peninsula. The three preserve extensions were on Caughey-Taylor Nature Preserve in Bocabec, Sugar Island Nature Preserve on the Saint John River, and at the Connors. Bros Nature Preserve at Pea Point. Finally, the lease for Shea Lake Nature Preserve, the Nature Trust’s first preserve, was renewed with Acadian Timber. The Nature Trust also grew it’s stewardship groups, implemented a new CRM, worked with landowners and harvesters on protecting the Appalachian Hardwood Forest, and held a very successful Great Fundy Cleanup in the lower Bay of Fundy, among many other great accomplishments in 2016-17.

“Looking back on this year, it’s clear that the Nature Trust has had a significant impact on New Brunswick’s natural spaces.” Says Nature Trust Executive Director, Renata Woodward. “Our conservation, stewardship, and education efforts are growing each year, with more people joining us in supporting our organization. I encourage anybody interested in learning more about protecting New Brunswick’s biodiversity to join us at our annual general meeting.”

A conservation options presentation will begin at the Maple Tree Café at 12:30, with the annual general meeting taking place from 1 to 1:45 pm. All are welcome to attend and learn more about the Nature Trust’s conservation, stewardship, and educational initiatives. Follow the meeting, there will be a guided nature walk taking place on the nearby Mapleton Acadian Forest Nature Preserve from 2:30 to 4 pm, providing a unique opportunity to experience one of the Nature Trust’s nature preserves firsthand. For more information and to attend the AGM, please contact Curtis Richardson at curtis.richardson@ntnb.org or (506) 457-2398.

About the Nature Trust of New Brunswick
Established in 1987, the Nature Trust of New Brunswick is a registered charitable conservation organization dedicated to preserving the province’s ecologically significant landscapes. To date, the Nature Trust has conserved over 2,830 hectares (7,000 acres) in 50 beautiful and diverse nature preserves in New Brunswick. For more information, visit www.naturetrust.nb.ca

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 © 2018 NBEN / RENB