CCNB logo HRAttention News Editors: Here is some background that may be helpful in reporting on Environment and Local Government Minister Serge Rousselle’s comments today about a carbon-pricing system for New Brunswick:
  • To date, Canadian jurisdictions that have announced or implemented a system for pricing carbon include Newfoundland and Labrador, Nova Scotia, Quebec, Ontario, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta, British Columbia, and, now, New Brunswick.
  • In June 2017, New Brunswick’s Auditor General delivered a substantive review of the province’s climate change plan, including recommendations to turn policy intentions into on-the-ground work to protect homes and communities from what she called “one of the greatest challenges for communities, governments and corporations in the coming decades.” Among other things, the review called for an aggressive timeline and full details on how the government plans to execute the 118 actions laid out in its Climate Change Action Plan.
  • New Brunswick’s Climate Change Action Plan, released in December 2016, contained all the elements for effective climate action in N.B., including commitments to Premier-led governance, target-driven policies, and sources of funding to support programs for low-income families, homeowners, and industry. It also included several measures called for by the Legislative Select Committee on Climate Change, including legislating carbon pollution reduction targets and energy-efficiency improvement targets, and phasing out coal from electricity production and phasing in more renewable energy like solar, wind, biomass and hydro.
  • One month after the climate change plan was released, New Brunswickers experienced a sobering example of climate change impacts at home with the January 2017 ice storm that led to two people dying from carbon monoxide poisoning and nearly 300,000 homes and businesses left without power, some for up to 13 days. NB Power estimates the damages to its infrastructure at $30-million, making it the most expensive restoration in the utility's history.
  • New Brunswickers are keenly aware that climate change is already happening in their communities in the forms of more extreme ice storms, hurricanes and flooding events. The Ice Storm Review 2017, released in August 2017, provided a snapshot of climate change-related extreme weather events in New Brunswick, including but not limited to:
    • Hurricane Arthur in July 2014, which brought torrential rains and 100-km/hour winds that caused road closures and washouts and significant infrastructure damages across the province. The total damages were estimated at $12.5 million.
    • A Nor-easter in December 2014 which impacted 56 roads with flooding or washouts across several regions, with impacts primarily concentrated in the Moncton region. Damages totalled $10.3 million.
    • Extreme flooding and storm surges in December 2010 which resulted in $13.8 million in damages from flooding in Charlotte and York Counties, and $3 million in damages associated with storm surges affecting the east and northeast coasts of the province.

Jon MacNeill
Communications DirectorConservation Council of New Brunswick/
Conseil de conservation du Nouveau-Brunswick
458-8747 | 238-3539
Le 7 décembre, 23 groupes ont signé une déclaration sur l'économie à faible carbone.  Pour lire la déclaration complète, cliquez ici

La déclaration demande au gouvernement du Nouveau-Brunswick de :
  • adopter l’établissement de l’économie à faible carbone comme la base pour une économie plus stable et résiliente, commençant en 2018;
  • inclure des mesures de protection transparentes prévenant la possibilité de cacher ou de fausser les émissions de carbone et les figures de crédits de carbone;
  • Assurer les succès en refusant les mesures de neutralité de revenu, la tarification basée sur la valeur et autres mesures de retombement des groupes d’intérêt des consommateurs et des corporations;
  • Ne pas permettre de période de grâce pour la pleine implémentation du programme de taxe sur le programme, ni de donner de crédits plutôt que de les vendre aux industries qui polluent sous le régime de plafonnement et d’échange;
  • Investir et réinvestir tous les revenus de la taxe provinciale sur le carbone dans l’énergie propre, le transport et l’infrastructure propre ainsi que l’efficacité énergétique.
La déclaration fut signée par:
Association for the protection of marshes and beaches at l'Aboiteau
Citizens Coalition for Clean Air – Saint-Jean, N-B
Concerned Citizens of Saint John
Conseil des canadiens – Chapitre Atlantique
Conseil des canadiens – Chapitre du Comté de Kent
Department of Geography and Environment, Mount Allison University
Développement durable de Bathurst
East Brûlé Citizens for Protected Wetlands and Beaches 
Esgenoopetitj Watershed Association
Feu Vert – Grand-Sault, N-B
Fondation Sierra Club du Canada – Section du Canada Atlantique
Friends of Rockwood Park, INC. – Saint-Jean, N-B
NB Anti-Shale Gas Alliance
New Brunswickers Against Fracking – Doaktown, N-B
OCIA Atlantic
PEACE-NB
Recherche Indépendante de Retraité en Écologie
Red Dot Association of Shediac Bay
Sustainable Energy Group - Woodstock, N-B
Taymouth Environmental Action
University of New Brunswick Saint John Green Society
Voices for Sustainable Environments and Communities – Village deGagetown, N-B
West/Ouest Brûlé Ltd.
2017 Lieutenant-Governor’s Award of Excellence in Land Conservation Winner Announced


Fredericton, New Brunswick (Nov 29, 2017) – Dr. James (Jim) Goltz, a renowned veterinary pathologist, Manager of Veterinary Laboratory Services for the New Brunswick Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Aquaculture, and dedicated volunteer naturalist has been honoured with the Lieutenant-Governor’s Award for Excellence in Land Conservation. Dr. Goltz’s dedication to supporting conservation organizations in New Brunswick has made a significant impact on the progress of land conservation efforts in our beautiful province.

"I am delighted to recognize the long and dedicated work of Dr. Jim Goltz, "says Lt-Gov Jocelyne Roy Vienneau. "He serves as an inspiration for everyone try‎ing to make a 'green' difference. His is a wonderful New Brunswick story from which we can all learn."

A true leader in the conservation field in our province, Dr. Goltz has been an active field botanist for nearly 30 years, with a special interest in the flora of New Brunswick. From nature walks, to sitting on committees, and caring for natural areas, his enthusiasm in the conservation field continues to make a significant impact today. As a dedicated volunteer for the Nature Trust of New Brunswick, Jim has led nature walks at preserve openings, stewarded nature preserves by monitoring rare species of flora and fauna, and continues to provide advice regarding species identification and management activities. Jim is always willing to share his wisdom. These are just a small testament to Jim’s long history as a conservationist.

“For such a small province, New Brunswick has an incredibly rich biodiversity with many natural history wonders worthy of protection and global recognition. Soon after I moved here in the mid-1980s, I fell in love with the province, especially the beautiful river valleys, magnificent forests, spectacular wetlands and diverse coastlines, and the many wild plants and animals that reside here.” Says Dr. Goltz, “The province’s strong reliance on natural resources continues to put tremendous pressure on the landscapes and wildlife, including plants and animals, that human residents of the province and visitors so deeply cherish and take for granted.  It’s a profound and humbling  honour to be recognized among the cadre of dedicated conservationists who are working tirelessly to preserve the species and natural ecosystems of this province.  I am especially delighted to witness amazing progress in protecting the Appalachian Hardwood Forest remnants in the St. John River Valley, thanks to the Nature Trust of New Brunswick, the Meduxnekeag River Association, the Nature Conservancy of Canada and the communities and many people who support them.”

“On behalf of the Nature Trust of New Brunswick, our team would like to extend a congratulations to Dr. Goltz. His considerable work in conservation in New Brunswick makes Jim an excellent recipient for this year’s award.” Says Vince Zelazny, President of the Nature Trust of New Brunswick, “Jim can identify a very long list of birds, amphibians, reptiles, butterflies, moths, and is without a doubt among the most hard-working and well-rounded field naturalists in Canada. We are pleased to join our Honorary Patron, The Honourable Jocelyne Roy Vienneau, to give thanks to those who contribute so much to the excellent work being done in land conservation in our province.”

“With top-notch credentials, expert knowledge of botany and ornithology, and a passion for exploration, he could have pursued his professional career, and made his home and name as a naturalist, in any part of Canada or elsewhere. He chose New Brunswick. Perhaps it was love at first sight—I don’t know. But clearly, he soon fell for the place and people here. He realized that, for an area of its size, New Brunswick has a remarkably varied and interesting natural environment.” Says Stephen Clayden, Curator at the New Brunswick Museum and Jim’s longtime friend, “In short order he got to know naturalists and others around the province, and became widely known and admired for his extraordinary generosity. He has freely shared his expert knowledge of flora and fauna, led countless outings, and lent his time and organizational skills to many groups and projects.”

“Each and every nature foray here still evokes for me an incredible sense of awe and wonder.  Through leading nature forays, sharing my enthusiasm for nature and showing people photographs of nature’s treasures, I hope that others will be inspired to learn more about nature, do whatever they can to pass on their love and knowledge, and translate these into conservation actions.  I very much appreciate New Brunswick’s scientists, naturalists, outdoor enthusiasts and other experts who continue to graciously and generously share their wealth of knowledge with me and others, feeding our insatiable curiosity to learn more about the world around us.” Says Dr. Goltz.

Dr. Goltz will be awarded the Lieutenant-Governor’s Award for Excellence in Land Conservation by the Honourable Jocelyne Roy Vienneau at Government House in Fredericton on Wednesday, November 28th during the annual award ceremony.

About the Award
The Lieutenant-Governor’s Award for Excellence in Land Conservation was established in 2012 to mark the 25th anniversary of the Nature Trust of New Brunswick. Previous recipients of the award have included the late Mary Majka, the Meduxnekeag River Association, Roberta Clowater, and the late Don Dennison. As the Honorary Patron of the Nature Trust of New Brunswick, Lieutenant-Governor Jocelyne Roy Vienneau, presents the annual award in recognition of an individual or organization that has made significant contributions to the protection of natural heritage through stewardship, volunteerism, donation of lands or building effective partnerships. In 2015, the Donald G. Dennison Nature Trust of New Brunswick Legacy Fund was created from memorial donations to the Nature Trust following Don’s death from cancer. His family established the Legacy Fund in Don’s honour. 

About the Nature Trust of New Brunswick
Established in 1987, the Nature Trust of New Brunswick is a registered charitable land conservation organization dedicated to preserving the province’s ecologically significant landscapes. To date, the Nature Trust has conserved over 7,000 acres (2,700 hectares) in more than 50 beautiful and diverse nature preserves in New Brunswick. For more information, visit www.naturetrust.nb.ca.
Le RENB est heureux d’être le partenaire local pour ÉcoNous 2018, la conférence annuelle du Réseau canadien de développement économique communautaire, qui aura lieu à Moncton en septembre 2018.
ECONOUS LOGOS 2018 w tag

Axé sur le développement économique communautaire vert, ÉcoNous2018 réunira des conférenciers/ères de renom, des sessions dynamiques et des opportunités de réseautage à propos des Personnes (communautés inclusives), de la Planète (environnements durables) et de l'Économie (prospérité locale) ainsi que ces différents éléments qui créent une économie au service de tous.Qui ou quoi devrait être sur l’ordre du jour?  Faites connaitre vos idées au comité de planification ici : https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/V226TJX
(St. Andrews, NB) The Nature Trust of New Brunswick has been presented with another opportunity to extend the iconic Caughey-Taylor Nature Preserve in Bocabec, near St. Andrews.

The beautiful 600-acre Caughey-Taylor Nature Preserve features more than 9 km of hiking trails that lead through various ecosystems and forests. This preserve is enjoyed year-round by hikers, kayakers, and snowshoers. The Nature Trust is currently in the final stages of acquiring a 12.5-acre extension that will provide a buffer to the Sam Orr’s Pond and allow for the extension of the nature trail.

The J T Clark Family Foundation has generously pledged to match any further donations to the Nature Trust’s fundraising campaign, up to $3500. “We are very thankful for the continued support from the Clark Foundation.” says Nature Trust President, Vince Zelazny. “The Clark Foundation has supported many other nature preserve acquisitions in the past. We are excited to continue this partnership and secure this important extension at Caughey-Taylor Nature Preserve, and ask the public to help the Nature Trust reach its fundraising goal for this important extension.”

Caughey-Taylor Nature Preserve is designated under the Protected Natural Areas Act, which provides the highest level of protection possible and helps to support the diverse wildlife that seek refuge in the rich wetlands and forests. In addition to providing crucial habitat for wildlife, the preserve sees hundreds of visitors each year. “Caughey-Taylor is truly a gem in the Bay of Fundy area.” says Caughey Taylor Nature Preserve volunteer and Board member, Walter Emrich. “With an extensive trail system, visitors to the preserve are taken through various ecosystems and breathtaking lookouts as they make their way to Berry Point, the last stop on the trail.”

The Nature Trust has pushed the property closing date to December, and needs support from the community to complete this extension. Donations to the fundraising campaign can be made online via Chuffed at https://chuffed.org/project/caughey-taylor-extension or by calling the Nature Trust office at (506) 457 2398.

Caughey-Taylor Nature Preserve can be found on Route 127 in Bocabec, 12 km north of St. Andrews. You can learn more about Caughey-Taylor Nature Preserve by visiting www.naturetrust.nb.ca. If you have any questions about Caughey-Taylor Nature Preserve or the fundraising campaign, please contact Renata at renata.woodward@ntnb.org.

About the Nature Trust of New Brunswick

Established in 1987, the Nature Trust of New Brunswick is a registered charitable conservation organization dedicated to preserving the province’s ecologically significant landscapes. To date, the Nature Trust has conserved over 2,830 hectares (7,000 acres) in 50 beautiful and diverse nature preserves in New Brunswick. For more information, visit www.naturetrust.nb.ca.
Le weekend dernier, lors du rassemblement Éco-Confluence, le RENB a lancé son nouveau logo !
logo 1

La violette représente l’emblème floral du Nouveau-Brunswick et son environnement.  Le centre est le réseau qui nous rassemble tous.

Ce logo a été conçu par Annika Chiasson, coordonnatrice des communications au RENB et talentueuse graphiste.

October 31, 2017
(For immediate release)

Fredericton, NEW BRUNSWICK. A retired research scientist for the Canadian gov­ern­ment and expert on genetically modified foods, Dr. Thierry Vrain, will be in New Brunswick between October 30 and November 2, 2017, where he will be presenting his findings to the public in four communities: St. Louis-de-Kent, Edmundston, Petitcodiac and Fredericton Junction.

Dr. Vrain worked for 30 years as a research sci­en­tist for the Canadian gov­ern­ment in Québec and British Columbia where he con­ducted research on genet­i­cally mod­i­fied pota­toes, among other projects. In British Columbia, Dr. Vrain was section Head of the Biotechnology and Nematology sections at the Pacific Agri-Food Research Centre (Agriculture Canada) in Summerland.

The most common genetically engineered crops have been modified to be resistant to glyphosate-based herbicides such as Monsanto’s Round-Up, and this has been a major focus of Dr. Vrain’s work. For the past decade, he has been travelling the world to inform the public of the unacceptable risks that glyphosate poses to human health and the environment.

In New Brunswick glyphosate-based herbicides are widely sprayed on agricultural land and on forests or softwood plantations to kill off hardwoods that might complete with conifers planted for pulp and other low-value wood products.

Dr. Vrain’s visit could not be more timely. The subject of herbicide spraying on public forests and on NB Power right-of-ways is garnering a great deal of public attention and provoking widespread protest, spearheaded by the work of the Stop Spraying NB movement (Facebook Group: Stop Spraying in New Brunswick).

In recent years, glyphosate has come under a great deal of scrutiny world-wide. In 2015, the World Health Organization’s research arm labelled glyphosate a “probable carcinogen” and in 2017, a long-term study published in Science Reports linked “chronic ultra-low dose” exposure to glyphosate-based herbicides with liver disease in rats.  The same year documents unsealed by court order in the United States revealed collusion between an official in the Environmental Protection Agency and Monsanto to falsify academic reports and stifle others to give glyphosate-based herbicides a clean bill of health. More recently, California has added glyphosate to its list of cancer-causing agents that must come with a warning label. 

In New Brunswick, a number of municipalities, including Moncton, Cap Pelé, Tracadie, Miscou, Tide Head, Paquetville, Sackville and community groups such as the Saint-Quentin and Cap Pelée/Beaubassin-Est Chambers of Commerce, have publicly expressed their support of the Stop Spraying NB movement by either sending letters of concern to provincial government or signing a resolution against spraying in our forests and under NB Power lines.

The movement to stop pesticide spraying in New Brunswick on public lands and under NB Power lines is rapidly gaining momentum. Signs calling for an end to the spraying are popping up all over New Brunswick. At the Union of Municipalities Tradeshow on September 29, 2017, municipal politicians and staff noted that, “there are signs everywhere.”

More than 35,000 people have already signed a petition to stop the spraying, with more coming in every day. Citizens of this province are growing more and more aware of the immense value of their diverse Acadian forests, their wildlife, their drinking water, their rivers and lakes, forest foods, and their health. They are demanding a ban on the spraying of herbicide on their woodlands.

Dr. Vrain’s presentations are of utmost importance, focusing as they do on the research that Health Canada is choosing to ignore, the negative effects of glyphosate residue in and on edible plants, including the berries, mushrooms, medicinal plants that NB citizens gather in our forests, and which wildlife depend on for their survival.

Dr. Thierry Vrain’s public presentations are being hosted and funded by local community groups, together with a number of grassroots organizations that are listed below, and will help the public become better informed about scientific knowledge on long-term, low-dose exposure to glyphosate.

Wednesday, November 1, 7-9 pm
Maritime Motorsports Hall of fame
Petitcodiac, NB
(Organized in collaboration with SSNB Inc.)

Thursday, November 2, 7-9 pm
Royal Canadian Legion Branch 55
159 Sunbury Drive
Fredericton Junction, NB
(Organized in collaboration with The Right Not To Be Poisoned)

CONTACTS:
(English) Dr. Caroline Lubbe-D'Arcy (Chair, SSNB Inc.): 506-292-7503 email: caroline@stopsprayingnb.ca www.stopsprayingnb.ca
(English) Morris Shannon (Right not to be Poisoned): (506) 455-4232 email: 245tmo@gmail.com
(French)  Francine Levesque (Écovie): 506-284-2769  email: canot@explornet.ca

Pour diffusion immédiate
30 octobre 2017

Samedi le 28 octobre 2017, un prix environnemental a été attribué à des citoyens du Nouveau-Brunswick pour souligner leurs services exemplaires à leur collectivité. 

La Red Head Anthony’s Cove Preservation Association été honorée par le prix Phénix « en reconnaissance de leur engagement inébranlable voué à la défense de leur communauté, qui fut à la base de leur réussite à contrer la menace d'un important développement industriel. »  Le prix Phénix est accordé annuellement pour ceux et celles qui ont consacré leurs efforts aux politiques et à la législation et qui ont été dans le feu de l’action.

La ferme de réservoirs et le terminal portuaire de l’Oléoduc Énergie Est étaient censés être construit à Red Head à Saint-Jean Est.  Les inquiétudes concernant les impacts environnementaux de ce projet sur leur communauté et sur les communautés à travers le et sur la baie de Fundy a incité les résidents locaux à s’organiser contre l’Oléoduc Énergie Est.  Grâce à leurs efforts, et à ceux de plusieurs autres, le long de l’oléoduc planifié, la proposition d’Énergie Est a été retiré par TransCanada plus tôt ce mois-ci.

Raissa Marks, directrice générale du Réseau environnemental du Nouveau-Brunswick, a loué les efforts de la Red Head Anthony’s Cove Preservation Association.  « Cette association a impressionné plusieurs personnes faisant partie du mouvement environnemental et plusieurs autres aussi.  Elle a démontré que des citoyens dévoués et laborieux peuvent résister à de grandes entreprises, bâtir des alliances et ressortir de grands défis plus forts et plus unis.  Les résidents de Red Head étaient situés au bout de l’oléoduc, mais ils ont démontré que peu importe l’endroit où l'on se trouve, se tenir debout faire une différence. 

Le prix a été présenté lors de la réunion annuelle du Réseau environnemental du Nouveau-Brunswick, Éco-confluence, qui a eu lieu à Fredericton la fin de semaine passée.  Chaque année, les efforts importants déployés par les citoyens et les groupes de citoyens pour protéger et restaurer l’environnement au Nouveau-Brunswick sont reconnu durant une cérémonie spéciale. 


Le Réseau environnemental du Nouveau-Brunswick est un réseau de communication sans but lucratif comprenant plus de 100 groupes environnementaux de citoyens et de citoyennes de toutes les régions de la province.  Le but du Réseau est d’encourager les communications et la collaboration parmi les groupes et entre les groups, le gouvernement et d’autres secteurs.

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Award Presentation Gordon Lynaya for web

Photo: Gordon Dalzell, Citizens Coalition for Clean Air, qui a présenté le prix Phénix 2017 à Lynaya Astephen, Red Head Anthony's Cove Preservation Association.  Crédit: Pascale Ouellette

(Fredericton, N.-B.) Partout au Nouveau-Brunswick, des organisations locales appuient la conservation de la biodiversité en préparant des projets de recherches, de restauration et d’éducation, qui engagent les gens des collectivités.  Les membres de ces organisations sont passionnés par la promotion et la protection de la diversité biologique de notre magnifique province.  Plusieurs de ces initiatives seront présentées durant la nouvelle campagne 30 Jours de biodiversité, qui durera tout le mois d’octobre.  Le Collectif pour la biodiversité au Nouveau-Brunswick s’occupera de la promotion d’une activité par jour sur les médias sociaux et sur différents sites Web.

« Nous avons la chance d’avoir au Nouveau-Brunswick un riche patrimoine naturel, » fait remarquer Nadine Ives du Conseil de conservation du Nouveau-Brunswick.  « Les Néobrunswickois se soucient de la nature et c’est formidable qu’il y ait tant de groupes et de personnes qui partagent cette passion pour les espèces et leurs habitats et qui travaillent fort pour les connaitre et les protéger.  Nous sommes ravis de pouvoir présenter des initiatives très intéressantes durant les 30 Jour de biodiversité. »  Vous pouvez retrouver toutes ces initiatives ici : http://nben.ca/fr/initiatives-biodiversite-nouveau-brunswick.

Durant ces 30 Jours de biodiversité, des initiatives provenant de plus de 20 organisations seront présentées.  Par exemple, le programme des patrouilleurs des plantes envahissantes de l’Alliance des associations de lacs qui cible la prévention des nouvelles introductions et de la propagation d’espèces de plantes exogènes.  Ces envahisseurs peuvent détruire des habitats, et causer la perte de communautés animales et végétales et d’autres problèmes encore.  Un autre programme, offert par Nature N.-B. depuis 2016, a publié des guides pour les enfants qui leur permettent d’identifier des oiseaux, des grenouilles, des arbres et d’autres plantes de leur propre environnement.  Toutes ces activités se déroulent en anglais ou en français, et ces guides sont gratuits pour tous les enfants du Nouveau-Brunswick.

Ce ne sont que deux des nombreuses initiatives pour la biodiversité de notre province.  Les groupes environnementaux, les groupes communautaires, les chercheurs, et tous les autres intéressés sont encouragés à soumettre leurs initiatives pour qu’elles soient présentées, ici: http://nben.ca/fr/initiatives-biodiversite-nouveau-brunswick

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Concernant la biodiversité: la diversité biologique, ou en bref, la biodiversité, se réfère à la variété de toutes les formes de vie, ainsi que les écosystèmes et les processus naturels qui les soutiennent.  La province du Nouveau-Brunswick possède une stratégie provinciale qui porte sur la conservation de la biodiversité et l’utilisation des ressources biologiques d’une manière durable.  La stratégie provinciale s’accorde avec la Stratégie canadienne pour la biodiversité qui a été mise en place pour appuyer les obligations du Canada envers la Convention sur la diversité biologique des Nations-Unies, qui comprend un plan stratégique pour la biodiversité, incluant les cibles de la biodiversité d’Aichi, pour la période 2011-2020.

Concernant le Collectif pour la biodiversité au Nouveau-Brunswick : Le collectif pour la biodiversité au Nouveau-Brunswick est un effort de divers intéressés pour s’occuper de la protection de la biodiversité et des espèces en péril.  Le but du collectif est de travailler en collaboration pour renforcer les activités de surveillance sur le terrain et fournir une approche complète pour la protection de la biodiversité dans la province.  Les agences concernées sont très variées; la collaboration rassemble les citoyens de la conservation et les groupes environnementaux, les gouvernements fédéral, provincial et municipaux, des professeurs et des chercheurs, des planificateurs urbains et ruraux et des entreprises qui travaillent dans un esprit de coopération.

Contact:

Raissa Marks, Réseau environnemental du Nouveau-Brunswick, raissa.marks@nben.ca | 506-855-4144
Conservation on Canvas, an Exhibition of paintings of New Brunswick’s Nature Trust Nature Preserves by artist Michael McEwing, opens at the New Brunswick Museum on October 5th



(Saint John, NB) - In celebration of the Nature Trust of New Brunswick’s 30th anniversary, Conservation on Canvas, an exhibition of paintings featuring Nature Trust of New Brunswick Nature Preserves by New Brunswick artist and art educator Michael McEwing opens at the New Brunswick Museum on Thursday, 5 October 2017, from 5-7 PM.  The exhibition, a partnership between the Nature Trust of New Brunswick and the New Brunswick Museum showcases the natural beauty of New Brunswick.  A series of 33 oil paintings captures unique ecosystems and landscapes of Nature Trust preserves from around the province. The exhibition will travel throughout New Brunswick in 2018, and will be accompanied by art-in-nature workshops, immersing visitors in the natural wonders that surround us in our beautiful province.

The project began nearly four years ago, when Michael McEwing approached the Nature Trust with the idea to capture the beauty of Nature Trust preserves on canvas. “Early on, it began to dawn on me that this project would become about more than just exploring and painting nature preserves,” says McEwing, “it has become just as much about the incredible people who have joined me on the journey. The inspiration and knowledge that has been shared from the Nature Trust board members, staff, and volunteers is now embedded in the works themselves--a merger of artistic expression and passion for the biodiversity of nature."

Featuring preserves from Grand Manan and Blacks Harbour in the lower Bay of Fundy, to Shea Lake in the North, the Conservation on Canvas exhibition is a diverse showcase of New Brunswick’s landscapes and biodiversity. McEwing explains; “This series invites the viewer to join me on this adventure of discovering the wide diversity and unique ecology of these outstanding nature preserves.”  The goal of the project is to raise awareness of the natural diversity across New Brunswick, and to celebrate land conservation as a means of ensuring these landscapes and habitat remain protected for future generations.

“The Nature Trust is proud to be continuing our partnership with the New Brunswick Museum and the art community.” says Vice President of the Nature Trust’s Board, Wayne Burley, “it has been a joy to see these paintings take shape, depicting the varying landscapes of our province, and leaving a legacy like the nature preserves they represent. The community has rallied behind this project from day one, and have supported the art-in-nature workshops we’ve hosted.”  Burley has been involved with the project as an advisor since it began.

“Our province’s landscape has been the subject of many artists’ work for over two and a half centuries – Michael McEwing’s  focused attention captures a beauty that is worthy of both our attention and our preservation efforts,“ states Peter Larocque, New Brunswick Museum Art Curator. “The New Brunswick Museum is very pleased to continue our longstanding collaboration with the Nature Trust of New Brunswick and to help share the ongoing exploration of the province’s natural beauty and to showcase the talent of its contemporary artists.”

The exhibition will remain at the New Brunswick Museum until mid-January 2018.  It will travel then travel to the Andrew & Laura McCain Art Gallery in Florenceville-Bristol, the Sunbury Shores Arts & Nature Centre in Saint Andrews and the Grand Manan Art Gallery and the Grand Manan Museum.  The exhibition tour will conclude at Government House in Fredericton in fall 2018. Art-in-nature workshops and guided excursions on nearby nature preserves will accompany the exhibition at each location, led by McEwing, fellow artists, and naturalists, that will allow guests to deepen their knowledge of local biodiversity and create their own masterpieces.

All are welcome to join the artist and representatives of the organizing partners at the free exhibition opening at the New Brunswick Museum on October 5th at 5-7 PM.

Financial support for this project has also been graciously given by TD, McCain Foods, Stewart McKelvey and other supporters.

For more information:

Caitlin Griffiths or Aristi Dsilva, Communications & Marketing, New Brunswick Museum
(506) 654-7059 or (506) 643-2358
info@nbm-mnb.ca

Curtis Richardson, Communications Coordinator, Nature Trust of New Brunswick
(506) 457-2398
curtis.richardson@ntnb.org
Nature Trust to host AGM and Nature Walk on Mapleton Acadian Forest Nature Preserve

(Elgin, NB) On Sunday, October 1st from 1 to 4 pm, the Nature Trust of New Brunswick will host its Annual General Meeting at the Maple Tree Café in Elgin, New Brunswick. With the recent protection of the Mapleton Acadian Forest Nature Preserve in the community, the annual general meeting will be accompanied by a nature walk. Nature Trust supporters, volunteers and members will have the opportunity to meet, as well as reflect and discuss plans for the future of the organization.

“As the Nature Trust continues to celebrate its 30th anniversary celebrations, we are gearing up to begin our strategic planning sessions,” says Nature Trust President Vince Zelazny. “We have spent this summer engaging with members of communities throughout New Brunswick to learn what area of our organization is most important to them. We plan on using the data we’ve collected to help guide us during our planning.”

The Nature Trust has had a very successful year in 2016/17, conserving three new nature preserves, extending three existing preserves, and renewing a lease. The three new preserves were the Mapleton Acadian Forest Nature Preserve in Elgin, the Nelekwenekek Nature Preserve on Middle Island, and the Bonney Nature Preserve on the Kingston Peninsula. The three preserve extensions were on Caughey-Taylor Nature Preserve in Bocabec, Sugar Island Nature Preserve on the Saint John River, and at the Connors. Bros Nature Preserve at Pea Point. Finally, the lease for Shea Lake Nature Preserve, the Nature Trust’s first preserve, was renewed with Acadian Timber. The Nature Trust also grew it’s stewardship groups, implemented a new CRM, worked with landowners and harvesters on protecting the Appalachian Hardwood Forest, and held a very successful Great Fundy Cleanup in the lower Bay of Fundy, among many other great accomplishments in 2016-17.

“Looking back on this year, it’s clear that the Nature Trust has had a significant impact on New Brunswick’s natural spaces.” Says Nature Trust Executive Director, Renata Woodward. “Our conservation, stewardship, and education efforts are growing each year, with more people joining us in supporting our organization. I encourage anybody interested in learning more about protecting New Brunswick’s biodiversity to join us at our annual general meeting.”

A conservation options presentation will begin at the Maple Tree Café at 12:30, with the annual general meeting taking place from 1 to 1:45 pm. All are welcome to attend and learn more about the Nature Trust’s conservation, stewardship, and educational initiatives. Follow the meeting, there will be a guided nature walk taking place on the nearby Mapleton Acadian Forest Nature Preserve from 2:30 to 4 pm, providing a unique opportunity to experience one of the Nature Trust’s nature preserves firsthand. For more information and to attend the AGM, please contact Curtis Richardson at curtis.richardson@ntnb.org or (506) 457-2398.

About the Nature Trust of New Brunswick
Established in 1987, the Nature Trust of New Brunswick is a registered charitable conservation organization dedicated to preserving the province’s ecologically significant landscapes. To date, the Nature Trust has conserved over 2,830 hectares (7,000 acres) in 50 beautiful and diverse nature preserves in New Brunswick. For more information, visit www.naturetrust.nb.ca

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Logo_glow.pngConservation Council.jpg
For Immediate Release - Sept. 26, 2017

Environment and Climate Change Canada Reluctant to Enforce Regulations against Aquaculture Operators

K’JIPUKTUK/HALIFAX - A retired Environment Canada employee and conservation and environmental law groups are calling for action from the federal government after Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) confirmed certain aquaculture activities result in a disposal at sea, likely violating the federal Disposal at Sea Regulations. Despite this confirmation the activities appear to be continuing without any enforcement action by ECCC.

Aquaculture companies use a variety of drugs, disinfectants and pesticides in response to sea lice and disease on salmon, issues that come along with farming fish in the open ocean. Chemical residues and pesticides are released into the ocean after use despite limitations under the Disposal at Sea Regulations and the serious risk of harm these chemicals pose to the marine environment and wildlife.

In February 2016, retired Environment Canada employee Bill Ernst launched a formal complaint about the practice to ECCC. In his complaint, Ernst identified specific companies but noted that an industry-wide investigation was needed.

After more than a year of reviewing the complaint and undertaking investigations of activities taking place in New Brunswick, officials from ECCC confirmed to Mr. Ernst on April 25, 2017 that they had a reasonable belief that the companies he identified were violating the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 and that the department would take ‘appropriate’ enforcement action.

Yet, despite repeated requests from Ernst on how ECCC will enforce the Disposal at Sea Regulations, no clear enforcement action has happened. The aquaculture industry’s widespread practice of discharging chemicals into the marine environment continues.

Ernst, East Coast Environmental Law, West Coast Environmental Law Association, Conservation Council of New Brunswick, Ecology Action Centre, Living Oceans Society, and Friends of the Earth Canada are calling for an industry-wide investigation into the chemical dumping practice.

“I continue to be concerned that by the Government’s inaction. Minister McKenna is abdicating her responsibility to protect the marine environment and, in doing so, is giving the impression that the Government of Canada is willing to promote the aquaculture industry at the expense of other industries and environmental sustainability,” says Ernst.

Adds Lisa Mitchell, Executive Director with East Coast Environmental Law: “Aquaculture may be a valuable economic driver in the Atlantic Canadian economy, as are many other coastal industries, but to ensure these industries remain viable, the laws that protect the environment upon which they depend must be applied fairly and effectively. Private citizens should not bear the burden of enforcing those laws.”

“We commend Mr. Ernst for his efforts to ensure that the laws to protect our environment and coastal fisheries are being enforced,” says Matthew Abbott, Fundy Baykeeper with the Conservation Council of New Brunswick. “It is disappointing that ECCC has not taken the opportunity provided by Mr. Ernst’s complaint to comprehensively investigate pesticide and other chemical use on aquaculture sites in Canadian waters. An industry-wide investigation is needed.”

The ECCC report regarding Mr. Ernst’s complaint can be viewed here.
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For more information contact:

Bill Ernst

Environment Canada retiree

Wrernst1@gmail.com, 902-865-5771


Matthew Abbott, Fundy Baykeeper

Conservation Council of New Brunswick

matt.abbott@conservationcouncil.ca 506-458-8747


Lisa Mitchell, Executive Director

East Coast Environmental Law Association

lisa@ecelaw.ca 902-670-1113

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Pour publication immédiate
Date : 18 septembre 2017

Dundas, NB – Vendredi dernier, le Réseau environnemental du Nouveau-Brunswick en collaboration avec l’école Notre-Dame et le groupe de développement durable du pays de Cocagne ont lancé « Branchez-vous, faites des vagues 2017 » à l’école Notre-Dame.

« Branchez-vous, faites des vagues » est un défi aux groupes de jeunes de travailler ensemble dans leur collectivité locale pour aider à conserver le paysage et le littoral du Nouveau-Brunswick.  L’an dernier, plus de 400 jeunes Néobrunswickois ont participé à ce défi et ont planté ensemble 1254 arbres et nettoyé 20 hectares du littoral

Pascale Ouellette, coordonnatrice des programmes d’éducation et de sensibilisation rappelle que c’est une excellente occasion pour les jeunes de contribuer à la conservation et de créer des partenariats avec les groupes environnementaux de leur collectivité, et elle ajoute : « J’ai hâte de voir quelles seront les réalisations des jeunes en 2017. “  

Le lancement du 15 a été un des évènements où l’on a planté 150 arbres partout au pays pour célébrer le 150e anniversaire du Canada.  Ce projet a été rendu possible, entre autres, par l’administration canadienne, par ArbresCanada, par le programme de financement communautaire ÉcoAction, par la Coopérative financière UNI, et par plusieurs bénévoles dévoués des diverses régions de la province.

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Interlocutrice:
Pascale Ouellette, Coordonnatrice de l’éducation et de la sensibilisation, RENB
Tél. : 506-855-4144
Courriel : nben@nben.ca

image1
Tree Canada representative, Fabrice Parisi, speaking on Tree Canada’s role in tree planting events through Canada.

 image2
Students of École Notre-Dame welcoming ceremony attendees.
Éditorial par Nadine Ives

Il n’y a rien comme le sentiment de retourner à l’école.


Mais s’il était possible de capturer la liberté des journées d’été, l’exploration de l’expérimentation et de l’apprentissage en plein air pendant toute l’année ?

Le Nouveau-Brunswick accueille un groupe dévoué et novateur d’éducateurs en plein air qui savent enseigner à l’extérieur de l’école et qui ont conçu le programme du RENB « Les grands penseurs se rencontrent dehors » proviennent de milieux différents et de diverses disciplines, et ils sont très futés.

Par exemple, ces éducateurs savent qu’un enfant qui apprend en plein air profite d’avantages physiques, mentaux, émotionnels et d’un développement social, en plus d’améliorer leurs résultats académiques.

Et les mathématiques ?  Tracer la courbe des plantes trouvées dans différentes parties de la cour de récréation.  Regrouper les objets trouvés dans la nature selon leurs couleurs, leurs formes ou leurs textures.

Sciences et changements climatiques ?  Mesurez la température, la quantité de pluie et des chutes de neige et suivez ces données pendant un certain temps.  Observez le cycle de vie des grenouilles dans votre lieu humide local.

Alphabétisation ?  Écrivez une histoire imaginaire de la vie d’un insecte, ou d’un arbre.  Utilisez des adjectifs pour décrire les nuages.

Parfois, ceux qui ont des difficultés d’apprentissage en classe s’épanouissent lorsqu’ils ont l’occasion d’apprendre à l’extérieur – et presque tout le monde adore explorer la nature.

C’est donc une bonne nouvelle de constater que des enseignants, des parents et des élèves de partout dans la province et qui retournent en classe pour une autre année, seront reçus par notre équipe d’éducateurs en plein air qui s’est préparée pour une autre saison d’aide aux enseignants afin que leurs élèves se connectent aux riches occasions d’apprentissages tout juste à l’extérieur des murs de leurs classes – parce qu’après tout, au Nouveau-Brunswick, la nature n’est jamais très loin de nos seuils de porte.

Depuis 2015, l’équipe des « Grands penseurs se rencontrent dehors» a visité plus de 40 écoles partout dans la province pour aider les enseignants à faire en sorte que les leçons surgissent hors des pages pour se concrétiser en plein air devant les yeux des élèves.

Nos séances de formation sont divertissantes, engageantes, et remplies d’occasions d’activités dans lesquelles les enseignants peuvent eux-mêmes expérimenter la fièvre d’introduire le programme en plein air, et de voir combien c’est efficace de créer des souvenirs tissés de moments d’apprentissages importants qui demeurent avec les enfants pendant des années.

Les activités que nous pouvons présenter peuvent s’adapter à tous les domaines, liant des occasions d’apprentissage axées sur l’expérience aux compétences et aux buts de développement tel que décrit dans le programme provincial.

Comme une enseignante de l’École élémentaire Salem de Sackville le disait après avoir suivi la formation : « C’est l’avenir de l’éducation. »

Nous sommes parfaitement d’accord — et nous savons que lorsque votre enfant aura la chance d’apprendre en plein air, vous serez aussi de cet avis.

Plusieurs enseignants qui ont participé aux séances de « Grands penseurs se rencontrent dehors» affirment que c’est une façon fantastique d’atteindre les jeunes qui apprennent tout simplement mieux en agissant, tout en renforçant les leçons déjà apprises dans la classe.  Une enseignante d’une séance récente a très bien compris : « Le plus grand nombre de sens impliqué, le plus nombre de mouvements et d’expériences positives, meilleur sera l’apprentissage. »

Après avoir profité d’une leçon à l’extérieur, les élèves retournent à leur classe en étant plus concentrés et créatifs, ils possèdent une meilleure récollection et une mémoire améliorée, et ils peuvent mieux résoudre des problèmes, et travaillent mieux en collaboration avec leurs camarades.

Ce ne sont pas juste les enfants qui profitent du plein air.  L’enseignement à l’extérieur offre aux enseignants un nouvel enthousiasme pour leur travail et ouvre la porte à d’autres stratégies innovatrices d’enseignement.  Un enseignant qui prenait sa classe à l’extérieur pour une leçon de science a soudainement commencé à percevoir différentes façons de relier les mathématiques, le langage, les arts, les études sociales et plus encore.


Parler à l’enseignante de votre enfant à propos d’inviter l’équipe des « Grands penseurs se rencontrent dehors» à votre école.  Vous pouvez réserver une séance en contactant Pascale Ouellette, coordonnatrice des programmes d’éducation et de proximité du Réseau environnemental du Nouveau-Brunswick, au (506) 855-4144 ou par courriel au nben@nben.ca.

Assurons-nous que cette année, dans un plus grand nombre d’écoles de toutes les régions de la province, l’expression « retourner à l’école » ne voudra plus dire retourner à l’intérieur !

Nadine Ives est coordonnatrice des apprentissages en plein air au Conseil de conservation du Nouveau-Brunswick et membre fondatrice du programme  « Les grands penseurs se rencontrent dehors,» du Réseau environnemental du Nouveau-Brunswick.  Nous sommes reconnaissants pour l’appui du RENB, dont le personnel dévoué nous maintient organisés, et pour l’appui financier du Fonds en fiducie pour l’environnement du Nouveau-Brunswick et de la Fondation TD des amis de l’environnement.

Learning Outside Nov2016 75
The Nature Trust of New Brunswick is recruiting more volunteers to help steward the Caughey-Taylor Nature Preserve near St. Andrews and the Clark Gregory Nature Preserve on Deer Island and will be training volunteers this Sunday, September 3rd.

Caughey-Taylor Event: This Caughey-Taylor with a focus on trail maintenance and bird monitoring. Volunteers will meet in the new parking lot at the entrance to the Taggart’s Marsh and Chickahominey Mountain Trail.

 

WHEN: Sunday, Sept. 3rd, 2017 from 9 am to 12 pm.

 

WHERE: Caughey-Taylor Nature Preserve, Bocabec, near St. Andrews, NB.

 

Clark Gregory Event: The Friends of Clark Gregory Nature Preserve land stewards will be gathering to meet new volunteers and complete trail work at the nature preserve. Volunteers will meet at the parking area at the top of the entrance road to the northern parcel of the preserve.

WHEN: Sunday, Sept. 3rd, 2017 from 1:30 pm to 4 pm.

 

WHERE: Clark Gregory Nature Preserve, Deer Island, NB.

 

RSVP: For more info and to RSVP, please contact Richelle at richelle.martin@ntnb.org or 506-453-4886.
From the New Brunswick Anti-Shale Gas Alliance

The struggle to keep unconventional gas and oil development (UNGOD) out of New Brunswick is a story filled with many actors, heroes and organizations, each playing important and vital roles.

However, for many of us involved in that struggle, the seeds for our victory were largely sown by a single person – Stephanie Merrill, the Water Specialist at the Conservation Council of New Brunswick.  What follows is our special tribute to Stephanie, who is now heading out to share her expertise with the Global Water Futures program at the University of Saskatchewan.

http://www.noshalegasnb.ca/tribute-to-stephanie-merrill/
PRESS RELEASE

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Fredericton — (August 1, 2017)

Resist spraying, groups tell rural New Brunswickers

An alliance of 12 groups is calling on members of the public to be on the lookout for industrial-scale spraying of herbicides in their areas and to ask the spray crews to leave the area, states a press release from The Alliance to Stop Spraying NB (TASS-NB).

As spray season gets fully underway on plantations and powerlines around the province, Stop Spraying NB Inc. spokesperson Dr. Caroline Lubbe-D’Arcy says there is nothing illegal in rural residents politely asking sprayers to not spray, out of concern for deer and other wildlife habitat and their family’s health.

Most, but not all, spraying will take place on Crown/unceded land during the months of August and September.

Lubbe-D’Arcy says people should not put themselves at risk by approaching crews while they are actually applying the glyphosate herbicide, or get directly under spray planes or helicopters. Several incidents already this season have seen individuals who breathed in spray that drifted towards them sent to hospital for nausea and dizziness. Rather, people should try to go up to them before the spray begins.

Timber companies J.D. Irving, AV Cell, Acadian Timber and Fornebu as well as NB Power start actively carrying out their annual “vegetation management” programs this month. These involve both aerial and ground spraying of plantations and in the case of NB Power, transmission lines, dams, substations and other energy-related facilities.

Lubbe-D’Arcy notes there is much concern in the rural areas where alliance groups have been speaking with landowners and distributing signs opposing herbicide spraying.

“We are hearing from hunters that their hunting territories have been destroyed and the deer populations have vanished. Also, moose livers often cannot be consumed, leaving doubts about the quality of the meat they are feeding to their family. We strongly suggest hunters call their MLAs and the Department of Energy and Resource Development (DERD) in their area to tell them to stop spraying their hunting zones,” she said.

Maps showing the proposed locations for spraying were released by the DERD last week and are available at http://geonb.snb.ca/herbicide/index.html. Stop Spraying NB had to file a “Right to Information” request in order to acquire maps showing spraying that took place from 2013-2016. In the past four years, more than 60,000 ha of New Brunswick Crown/unceded land has been sprayed at a total cost of $10 million in taxpayer funds. People who do forest thinning and brush clearing for a living are losing jobs due to this practice.

“The herbicide glyphosate is a “probable human carcinogen” according to the World Health Organization, and New Brunswick has the highest application rate in all of Canada when it comes to forestry,” Lubbe-D’Arcy says.

Volunteer Joan Goodwin Price is one of a dozen or so volunteers out talking with rural people about spraying. “At first we weren’t sure how we were going to be received. But the reception we’ve had has been completely overwhelming. People embrace us and the signs because they [signs] express their outrage” against the spraying and the government which permits it to go on, she says.

Signs have started popping up in the Rogersville, Blackville, Doaktown, Petitcodiac, Elgin, Parkindale and Moncton areas over the past several weeks.

Alliance member group Écovie (Kedgwick) is taking their objections to spraying outside — to an area where glyphosate is slated to be applied — in order to make their point. This year, the "Happy Campers" of Restigouche West will be camping in an area where spraying is planned, beside the road leading to Mount Carleton Wilderness Park, an important protected area and park.

This action will draw attention to their demand that the spraying stop. Organizers expect campers will erect tents, distribute literature and explain the alternatives to spraying to anyone wishing to learn about it.

Écovie spokesperson Francine Levesque said, “We are being drowned in spray in our region. The map of the past four years of spray activity we have shows the intensity with which lands in the Saint Quentin-Kedgwick area are getting clearcut and sprayed. It is a catastrophe.”

The campers will be on-site August 5, 6 and 7, on Route 385 near the Tobique River.


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Media Contacts:


Dr. Caroline Lubbe D’Arcy, Stop Spraying NB Inc. (506) 292-7503 (cell) carolinelubbedarcy@gmail.com

(French)Ms. Francine Levesque, Écovie, canot@xplornet.ca (506) 284-2769 (landline)

alternate: Denise Melanson, Council of Canadians, inrexton2013@yahoo.ca (506) 523-9467.

Kevin Shaw, Miramichi Headwaters Salmon Federation, Juniper (506) 245-1960 (landline)
Dans son plus récent rapport sur l’état des aires protégées au Canada, la Société pour la nature et les parcs du Canada (SNAP) presse le/la Nouveau-Brunswick de redoubler d’efforts afin de protéger plus de terres d’ici 2020. Dans son rapport 2017, De retardataire à chef de file ? L’intérêt renouvelé du Canada pour la protection de la nature pourrait donner des résultats, la SNAP encourage les gouvernements fédéral, provinciaux et territoriaux à déployer davantage d’efforts afin de protéger et conserver le patrimoine naturel du Canada et ainsi respecter notre engagement international.

Avec à peine 10,6 % de son territoire actuellement protégé, le Canada se situe en-dessous de la moyenne mondiale de 15 %, et accuse de surcroît un retard face à d’autres grands pays tels que la Chine, le Brésil et l’Australie. En 2010, dans un effort mondial visant à contrer l’appauvrissement de la biodiversité, le Canada s’est engagé dans le cadre de la Convention des Nations Unies sur la diversité biologique à protéger au moins 17 % des terres et des eaux intérieures d’ici 2020, et à améliorer la qualité de ses réseaux d’aires protégées afin de mieux conserver la nature.

Le rapport souligne que les gouvernements canadiens commencent tout juste à accorder une importance à cet engagement, après des années d’inaction. En février 2017, les ministres fédéraux, provinciaux et territoriaux responsables des parcs et des aires protégées ont rendu publique leur intention de travailler de concert afin d’atteindre cet objectif. Une nouvelle initiative, En route vers 2020, a été entamée, et un cercle d’experts autochtones ainsi qu’un groupe consultatif national ont été désignés pour conseiller les ministres dans ce dossier.

« Au Nouveau-Brunswick, nous avons remarqué absence de progrès sur des sites naturelles, comme la Restigouche, déclare Roberta Clowater, Directrice Générale, SNAP N-B . La province peut prendre des mesures immédiates pour aider le Canada à atteindre nos objectifs, incluant préparer un plan d’action pour 2020 et au-delà dans une optique d’élargir le réseau d’aires protégées du Nouveau-Brunswick et de protéger ce qu’il reste des forêts anciennes, des milieux humides importants, des rivières, des lacs et des côtes spectaculaires. »

« Il ne reste que trois ans avant d’atteindre notre objectif pour 2020, il faut que l’on s’attèle à la tâche dès aujourd’hui, ajoute Hébert-Daly. Dans le rapport, nous identifions des endroits au Canada où une quantité de travail importante a déjà été accomplie pour proposer des aires protégées. En agissant dès maintenant pour protéger ces aires de façon permanente tout en établissant un plan d’action pour assurer la conservation à long terme, nous pouvons passer de retardataire à chef de file. »

Clowater ajoute, « À court terme, le Nouveau-Brunswick pourrait protéger l’une des rivières les plus majestueuses mais aussi l’une des plus menacées de l’est du Canada : la rivière Restigouche, qui chevauche la limite entre le nord-ouest du Nouveau-Brunswick. Le gouvernement pourrait établir un zone protégée la voie navigable en région sauvage de la Restigouche – qui serait un vaste corridor protégé le long de la rivière aménagé sur les terres publiques – et, du même coup, se doter d’une destination touristique de calibre mondial. »

Les aires protégées sont essentielles à la conservation des espèces sauvages et de la nature en plus de fournir à tous les Canadiens et Canadiennes de l’air et de l’eau propres, de séquestrer le carbone et de jouer un rôle crucial dans l’amélioration de la santé et du bien-être. Elles sont en outre viables sur le plan économique. À l’échelle de la planète, par année les aires protégées génèrent 600 milliards de dollars US en dépenses directes, alors qu’il en coute moins de 10 milliards de dollars US pour les créer et les entretenir.

Depuis plus de 50 ans, la SNAP collabore avec tous les paliers de gouvernement et des partenaires nationaux dans le but de protéger plus de régions sauvages au Canada. En tant qu’unique organisme à but non lucratif dédié à la protection des terres et des eaux publiques, nous sommes dans une position exceptionnelle pour aider les gouvernements à déterminer les mesures de conservation nécessaires. Fredericton, le 24 juillet 2017 – Dans son plus récent rapport sur l’état des aires protégées au Canada, la Société pour la nature et les parcs du Canada (SNAP) presse le/la Nouveau-Brunswick de redoubler d’efforts afin de protéger plus de terres d’ici 2020. Dans son rapport 2017, De retardataire à chef de file ? L’intérêt renouvelé du Canada pour la protection de la nature pourrait donner des résultats, la SNAP encourage les gouvernements fédéral, provinciaux et territoriaux à déployer davantage d’efforts afin de protéger et conserver le patrimoine naturel du Canada et ainsi respecter notre engagement international.  

Avec à peine 10,6 % de son territoire actuellement protégé, le Canada se situe en-dessous de la moyenne mondiale de 15 %, et accuse de surcroît un retard face à d’autres grands pays tels que la Chine, le Brésil et l’Australie. En 2010, dans un effort mondial visant à contrer l’appauvrissement de la biodiversité, le Canada s’est engagé dans le cadre de la Convention des Nations Unies sur la diversité biologique à protéger au moins 17 % des terres et des eaux intérieures d’ici 2020, et à améliorer la qualité de ses réseaux d’aires protégées afin de mieux conserver la nature.

Le rapport souligne que les gouvernements canadiens commencent tout juste à accorder une importance à cet engagement, après des années d’inaction. En février 2017, les ministres fédéraux, provinciaux et territoriaux responsables des parcs et des aires protégées ont rendu publique leur intention de travailler de concert afin d’atteindre cet objectif. Une nouvelle initiative, En route vers 2020, a été entamée, et un cercle d’experts autochtones ainsi qu’un groupe consultatif national ont été désignés pour conseiller les ministres dans ce dossier.

« Au Nouveau-Brunswick, nous avons remarqué absence de progrès sur des sites naturelles, comme la Restigouche, déclare  Roberta Clowater, Directrice Générale, SNAP N-B .  La province peut prendre des mesures immédiates pour aider le Canada à atteindre nos objectifs, incluant préparer un plan d’action pour 2020 et au-delà dans une optique d’élargir le réseau d’aires protégées du Nouveau-Brunswick et de protéger ce qu’il reste des forêts anciennes, des milieux humides importants, des rivières, des lacs et des côtes spectaculaires. »

 « Il ne reste que trois ans avant d’atteindre notre objectif pour 2020, il faut que l’on s’attèle à la tâche dès aujourd’hui, ajoute Hébert-Daly. Dans le rapport, nous identifions des endroits au Canada où une quantité de travail importante a déjà été accomplie pour proposer des aires protégées. En agissant dès maintenant pour protéger ces aires de façon permanente tout en établissant un plan d’action pour assurer la conservation à long terme, nous pouvons passer de retardataire à chef de file. »   

Clowater ajoute, « À court terme, le Nouveau-Brunswick pourrait protéger l’une des rivières les plus majestueuses mais aussi l’une des plus menacées de l’est du Canada : la rivière Restigouche, qui chevauche la limite entre le nord-ouest du Nouveau-Brunswick. Le gouvernement pourrait établir un zone protégée la voie navigable en région sauvage de la Restigouche – qui serait un vaste corridor protégé le long de la rivière aménagé sur les terres publiques – et, du même coup, se doter d’une destination touristique de calibre mondial. »

Les aires protégées sont essentielles à la conservation des espèces sauvages et de la nature en plus de fournir à tous les Canadiens et Canadiennes de l’air et de l’eau propres, de séquestrer le carbone et de jouer un rôle crucial dans l’amélioration de la santé et du bien-être. Elles sont en outre viables sur le plan économique. À l’échelle de la planète, par année les aires protégées génèrent 600 milliards de dollars US en dépenses directes, alors qu’il en coute moins de 10 milliards de dollars US pour les créer et les entretenir.

Depuis plus de 50 ans, la SNAP collabore avec tous les paliers de gouvernement et des partenaires nationaux dans le but de protéger plus de régions sauvages au Canada. En tant qu’unique organisme à but non lucratif dédié à la protection des terres et des eaux publiques, nous sommes dans une position exceptionnelle pour aider les gouvernements à déterminer les mesures de conservation nécessaires.

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Lire le rapport intégral.
NB Needs to Act Protect Restigouche Wilderness Waterway2
Pour les entrevues, contacter Karen Turner au (613) 569-7226 x 232.
Ben Baldwin will forever be remembered by many Miramichiers and New Brunswickers as the farmer who used his scientific knowledge to take on the polluters of Miramichi. Ben died peacefully at his home in Miramichi on July 7, 2017 at the age of 86.

A founder of the Miramichi Environmental Society and a former board member of the Conservation Council of New Brunswick, Ben was a geologist and an environmentalist when being an environmentalist wasn’t cool nor easy.

Ben Baldwin 2009 321x480Ben Baldwin at the Conservation Council’s Spring Auction in 2009.

An edition of Harrowsmith magazine from 1991 features Ben in its hometown hero series. Ben told the reporter, “Somebody has to speak out. It’s nothing particularly heroic on my part. I care about what’s happening. You get disgusted, and it takes a lot of physical energy. But as long as we live here, we can’t avoid being involved in environmental issues. We breathe the air too; we can’t just sit back and ignore the stink.”

Starting almost immediately upon his return from Western Canada to live a life on his family farm in Miramichi in 1985, Ben soon responded to remedy a local farmer’s concerns of chemicals oozing onto her property from the Domtar Wood Preserving Plant, and then to a long list of other environmental problems plaguing Miramichi.

“Ben was a big guy with a big heart who stood up for what he believed in. I had the good fortune to know Ben as a friend, and my life is the richer for it,” wrote David Coon, who worked with Ben during both their time with the Conservation Council of New Brunswick.

My earliest memory of Ben is of my dad, Donald Glynn, and Ben talking about their vegetables at the Miramichi Agricultural Exhibition on a hot summer day in August. Ben’s vegetables from Spruce Shade Farms almost always took first prize. Whenever dad spoke of Ben, it was always with such respect — an admiration shared by many across the province.

Ben was the partner of Inka Milewski, the Conservation Council’s former science advisor. The Conservation Council family expresses condolences and love to Inka and Ben’s children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren.

Written by Tracy Glynn of The Conservation Council of New Brunswick
Were you informed, inspired, or impressed by environmental reporting in New Brunswick in the past year? If you know of a deserving writer consider nominating them for this 2nd annual award. The deadline for nominations is July 31st, 2017.
 
 
The Beth McLaughlin Environmental Journalism Award
 
By recognizing the best environmental reporting, this award seeks to inspire journalists in all media and to showcase reporting that best addresses important environmental issues in New Brunswick. We invite journalists from traditional news media, independents, and non-profits, citizen journalists and students to submit their finest work.
 

Criteria and eligibility:

Entries must be predominantly about an environmental subject occurring in or affecting New Brunswick, and must have been published, broadcast, or posted during the calendar year preceding the current prize year (ie. in 2016).

Entries which address the following issues are particularly encouraged:

* investigative reporting that uncovers an important environmental issue in New Brunswick or is about an important issue not covered elsewhere
 
* stories alerting readers/listeners/viewers to an important emerging issue in New Brunswick

* stories that help clarify complex environmental issues or events of significance in New Brunswick

stories that uphold the journalistic principle of protecting the public interest

stories that resulted in improvements or positive change in the community

How to Apply:

Nominations may be made by environmental groups, media organizations, teachers, or any other interested parties.  Applicants may be self-nominating.

Submission deadline: July 31st, 2017.

Submit entries to: Conservation Council of New Brunswick, Southeast Chapter Environmental Journalism Award Committee, at ccnbsoutheast@gmail.com

Information to Include:

1. Nominator’s name, email, and phone number.

2. Journalist’s name, email, phone and/or other contact information.

3. Provide links to broadcast and online entries. Print entries can be provided as a pdf or html attachment or via web links where the entry is published or posted and publicly accessible. All links must be to the same version of the entry as originally aired, published or posted, with all the same graphics, headlines, photos, etc. and not modified after the contest year.

4. If the entry is not publicly accessible, permission must be obtained from the publisher for CCNB SE to link to it or repost it for public access.

5. Background information on the piece for the judges may be added, but is not required.

Thanks to generous donors, the award this year is worth $500.00 and two tickets to the CCNB SE Chapter fall event.

Full details at :  http://www.conservationcouncil.ca/13679/

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