FREDERICTON — Tracy Glynn, the forest program director of the Conservation Council of New Brunswick, issued the following statement about the report released today by the Office of the Chief Medical Officer of Health (OCMOH) on glyphosate.
The report confirms what we have long feared — that the forest industry uses more glyphosate in NB operations than any other province in Canada.

The report found that 40% of the forest land cut in NB in 2014 was sprayed with glyphosate compared to 28% in Ontario, 21% in Alberta, 18% in Manitoba and only 11% in Nova Scotia.

While 205,859 hectares were cut in Québec in the same year, no forest lands there were sprayed with glyphosate.

The analysis puts the key public policy question squarely back into the government’s hands. Namely, why, of all places in Canada, is NB spending so much taxpayer money on our companies’ spray programs when other jurisdictions, like Vermont and Québec, get on fine without it.

The report did discuss the human health risk associated with glyphosate. While it recognizes that there are many outstanding questions that need to be examined by Health Canada and its Pesticide Management Regulatory Agency (PMRA) in its long overdue re-evaluation of the chemical, the report says human health risks can be reduced if its label restrictions are properly followed.

The OCMOH points out that public health agencies in Canada and elsewhere have adopted a “wait and see” approach. The PMRA is currently reassessing glyphosate. The review of glyphosate, not expected until 2017, was delayed due to what the OCMOH called “rapidly-evolving new information.”

Beyond the scope of the OCMOH’s report are other concerns related to glyphosate use in forestry that weigh heavily on the minds of New Brunswickers. These concerns need to be addressed by our provincial government and include the environmental impacts of the use of glyphosate on deer, moose and aquatic species, and on water quality.

The report points out the uncertainty surrounding glyphosate use world-wide. Some European countries, like France, Sweden, Italy and the Netherlands, are arguing for a complete ban of its use in both agriculture and forestry. We believe that this supports our recommendation that a prudent action would be to stop using it in forestry operations, especially since more responsible alternatives are available and their use, in fact, would create more jobs.

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Additional Information
  • NB farmers use less glyphosate than those in other provinces, primarily due to the fact that NB grows fewer bushels of genetically modified corn and soybeans.
  • Québec banned herbicide use in its forests in 2001 due to public concern over human health impacts of spraying. Vermont, which has a similar forest type to New Brunswick, also stopped using herbicides in their forests, almost two decades ago, in 1997.
  • NB’s Auditor General recommended in her 2015 report that public forests should be managed for economic, environmental and social values, and highlighted that the province has lost money from the management of public forests for at least the last five years.
  • To see where NB forest will be sprayed this summer, click here.
Opponents push alternative to Mt. Carleton gas bar and snowmobile trail on mountain


Fredericton - A perfectly good alternative to developments being proposed for within Mt. Carleton Park exists outside the wilderness park, say people dead-set against an enlarged snowmobile circuit and gas bar being promoted by the Province.

Jean Louis Deveau is spokesman for a group of citizens concerned about the expanding presence of snow machines in the Park and their impact on wildlife. The group is advancing alternative locations to keep the park free of new infrastructure and what they view as incompatible use by motorized vehicles in New Brunswick’s only designated wilderness park. 

Governor's Lodge at Popple Depot, located east of the park, is one such alternative and is at the centre of a proposed snowmobile ‘hub.’ “From my understanding, Governor’s Lodge has the space for sled gatherings and it also sells gas,” Deveau, a former manager at Mt. Carleton said Tuesday.

“Why build new infrastructure to enable sleds to gas up in a wilderness park when there are already private establishments in the area offering the services they want?” Deveau asks. Taxpayers would pay for the gas dispensary being proposed for the park, whereas the gas dispensary at Popple Depot was paid for by the private sector.

“By putting a new gas bar in the park, the Province may well disadvantage or even handicap Governor’s Lodge and other privately owned gas distributors in the area. Won’t that defeat the Province’s goals of trying to create new jobs with this project?” Deveau said.

Park advocates including Deveau have launched a legal challenge to force the government to abandon the scheme to infringe on the Park, and to follow its own legislation. A crowdfunding campaign on gofundme.com was launched in June to help cover legal fees. The court is scheduled to hear the case on September 2nd in Woodstock.

The Parks Act (2014) stipulates a management plan based on a zoning system must be completed prior to any development in Provincial Parks. Mt. Carleton has been zoned but doesn’t have a management plan.


Press Release

A Bold, Made-in-New Brunswick Plan to Address Climate Change

Conservation Council of New Brunswick releases policy options to spur climate change conversation

July 13, 2016

Fredericton, N.B. –A new report from the Conservation Council of New Brunswick, released today, offers provincial politicians, environmental policy makers, and citizens a bold vision for New Brunswick. The three-part plan covers electricity, provincial investments, and government policies required to reduce greenhouse gas emissions while keeping bills low and creating jobs for New Brunswickers.

New Brunswick’s greenhouse gas emissions mostly come from using fossil fuel energy: coal, oil and natural gas to make electricity to heat and cool our homes, and power our appliances and industry, as well as gasoline and diesel to run our vehicles and trucks to move people and goods.

The Conservation Council’s“Climate Action Plan for NewBrunswick”proposes to reduce these emissions through investments to retrofit our buildings, starting with social and low-income housing; expanding efforts to install renewable energy like solar and wind; and accelerating installation of the Energy Internet (Smart Grid telecommunications) to manage a more distributed electricity load. These investments would help NB Power phase coal out of electricity production over the next 15 years. The Conservation Council’s plan also proposes creating incentives to help New Brunswickers buy electric and energy efficient vehicles and trucks as Ontario and Quebec have done, and modernizing industry and manufacturing to cut waste and pollution.

Blue-Green Canada, an alliance of labour and environmental groups calculates that for every $1 million invested in the fossil fuel sector two jobs are created, while 15 jobs are created for the same amount in the clean energy sector. Using those figures, New Brunswick could create up to 7,500 jobs a year by investing its climate action dollars in clean energy and energy efficiency retrofits which, in turn, would keep energy bills low for New Brunswickers.

QUOTES:

“There is strong scientific consensus that the climate is becoming unbalanced mostly because of human activity (95% - 100% certainty).” – Dr. Louise Comeau, Director of Climate Change and Energy Policy.

“Post-tropical storm Arthur opened New Brunswickers’ eyes to the reality of climate change. We now know and accept that climate change is a reality. The Conservation Council wants to start a serious conversation about adapting to, and mitigating, the damage to our communities as a result of a rapidly changing climate.” – Dr. Louise Comeau, Director of Climate Change and Energy Policy.

“We need a comprehensive climate action plan that helps New Brunswick do its fair share so others will too. We need to work together because we can’t protect the people and communities we care about from extreme changes to the climate without partnering to drastically cut greenhouse gas pollution.” - Dr. Louise Comeau, Director of Climate Change and Energy Policy.

“New Brunswick needs to implement policies and programs that are fair and cut waste by making polluters use clean energy and practice more sustainable agriculture and forestry.” – Dr. Louise Comeau, Director of Climate Change and Energy Policy.

“If we act together, we can limit the risks to our health and communities from a more extreme climate.” – Dr. Louise Comeau, Director of Climate Change and Energy Policy.

Key Facts:

• New Brunswick is the second most electricity-dependent economy in Canada behind Québec. As a regional energy hub, New Brunswick is well positioned to become a clean energy leader by investing heavily in NB Power’s Smart Grid technology to give the electricity system the capacity it needs to significantly increase the supply of renewable energy, phase out coal-fired generating stations, and provide load balancing services to Nova Scotia, PEI, and New England.

• Global investments in clean energy are increasing, spurring increased employment in the sector while the costs of clean energy have decreased significantly. Canada hasn’t kept pace, investing only $4 billion CND in 2015 while global investments in clean energy reached $325 billion USD, according to Clean Energy Canada’s Tracking the Energy Revolution 2016 report.

• In 2015, the Atlantic Premiers and New England Governors agreed to cut greenhouse gas emissions 35% to 45% below 1990 levels by 2030. New Brunswick’s contribution to meeting that goal is to eliminate 6.5 million tonnes from our carbon budget. Almost 40% of those reductions can be achieved by phasing out coal to generate electricity, as Ontario has already done and Alberta will do by 2030.

The Conservation Council of New Brunswick (conservationcouncil.ca) has been at the forefront of environmental protection in New Brunswick since 1969.We are a non-profit organization that creates awareness of environmental problems and advances practical solutions through research, education and interventions.


Contact: Mike Girard

Office: 506-458-8747

E-mail: mike.girard@conservationcouncil.ca
Jour heureux! Finalement il paraît que le Canada et le Nouveau-Brunswick discutent sérieusement du changement climatique. Très sérieusement. Et ils sont prêts à écouter! Les députés fédéraux organisent des assemblées publiques pour entendre ce que leurs constituants pensent au sujet des changements climatiques. Le gouvernement provincial a lancé un Comité spécial sur le changement climatique qui écoutera des témoins experts et aura des réunions autour de la province afin d’entendre ce que les gens ordinaires ont à dire. Et les groupes de travail fédéral-provincial ont un portail en ligne pour recueillir les opinions de tous.

Alors, c’est quoi l’attente? Pourquoi les environnementalistes ne plongent-ils pas tête première sur cette occasion? Pourquoi personne n’a entamé une grande campagne publique? C’est presque comme si c’était trop gros! Il semble comme si même les activistes environnementaux de longue date se sentent comme s’ils ne sont pas assez connaissants. Après tous, le changement climatique n’est pas l’expertise de la majorité des gens. Cela dit, tout le monde connait un peut ses impacts sur leur domaine de travail – eau, forêts, air, espèces en péril, santé.

Le changement climatique est l’enjeu en arrière-plan qui rôde dans les pensées de tous les environnementalistes. Qu’importe l’enjeu qui vous passionne le changement climatique y joue un rôle. Si vous travaillez pour améliorer l’environnement par l’entremise d’action directe telle que restaurer des rivières ou protéger des habitats précieux, ce beau travail pourrait être jeté aux quatre vents par le changement climatique. Si revendiquer la protection de la santé humaine par rapport à l’exposition chimique ou changer les normes en foresterie est votre truc, les scénarios avec les changements climatiques rendent les situations alarmistes encore plus alarmantes. De plus, si on commence à penser à nos petits enfants c’est difficile de garder même une miette d’optimisme.  

Nous sommes tous invités d’unir nos voix aujourd’hui. Unissons-les ensemble et montrons que lutter contre le changement climatique est aussi important qu’un enjeu peut l’être!

Pour plus d’information…
Plants and Animals Take New Brunswick Government To Court

Fredericton - When push comes to shove, as it has in the case of pending developments in New Brunswick’s only wilderness park, it’s always good to have allies with deep pockets.

Such allies are being courted by concerned citizens who are taking the Province of New Brunswick to court over its management of Mount Carleton Wilderness Park near Nictau, N.B. 

The proposal entails extending a network of snowmobile trails to the summit, park electrification and a gas bar, things the group opposing the project believes will damage the natural area and its wildlife.

“We’ve turned to Go Fund Me, a crowd-source fundraising website, to gather the $15,000 needed to stop this development in court,” said Jean Louis Deveau, former park manager at Mount Carleton. 

“The plants and animals cannot speak for themselves,” Deveau said. “With everything around the Park being clear cut, we cannot stand by and let this sanctuary be destroyed. We've raised over $13,000 in the past week so this clearly resonates with people.” 

Grand Chief Ron Tremblay of the Traditional Maliseet Government has reached out to media outlets to cover this story. In an interview on CBC radio this week he argued strenuously that snowmobiles should not be allowed to expand their range in the park.

“The commodification of this wild place through snowmobile tourism is not only incompatible with our values, tradition, and culture but will inevitably lead to conflicts between those who, like the Gallant Government, see the park as a place of business and those who, like us, see it as sacred,” said Tremblay. 

A provincial court justice will hear arguments at the end of June in Moncton. Donors are urged to go to GoFundMe.com and search for ‘Plants & Animals Take on NB Gov’t’ to contribute towards the group's court expenses.




La version française suit la version anglaise.


Funding appeal by the Plants, Swimmers, Flyers, Crawlers, and Four-legged creatures of Mount Carleton Provincial Park

We are the plants, swimmers, flyers, crawlers, and four-legged creatures of the park, whose ancestors have lived in this part of Wolastokuk (Maliseet homeland) for thousands of years.  Our wish for now is to have a New Brunswick court of law designate this part of Wolastokuk—our homeland—as our sanctuary.

Members of our extended families, the Kci-Putuwosultihtit Wolastoqiyik (Maliseet Grand Council), will bring our case before the court later this month. The Wolastoqewiyik (Maliseet people) have been, and always will be, our protectors. The Grand Chief of the Kci-Putuwosultihtit Wolastoqiyik, Ron Tremblay, will be joined by Jean Louis Deveau, a co-founder of the Friends of Mount Carleton and former manager of the park, who will intervene on our behalf. Our lawyer is Gordon Allen from Dartmouth, Nova Scotia. 

The struggle to preserve our home for All Our Relations by challenging in court the decision to turn our home into a snowmobile hub will take thousands of dollars of the plastic money used by two-legged creatures. The economy of the land, air, and water where we live, however, is based not on plastic money, but on sunlight. So, we don’t have plastic money used by two-leggeds and will need the help of friends like you to win this court challenge.

So, this a special appeal to those of you compassionate two-legged creatures, who understand that we are all interconnected in the circle of life and who are sympathetic to preserving our way of life, here and/or elsewhere in Wolastokuk homeland, to donate your kind of money to help pay for our legal fees in court.

Please make your donations, large or small, online via our Go Fund Me page or offline to the Maliseet Grand Council, c/o Alma Brooks, 50 Maliseet Drive, Fredericton, New Brunswick, E3A 2V9. 

• • •

Demande de fonds par les plantes, les créatures aquatiques, ailées, rampantes, et les créatures à quatre pattes du Parc provincial Mont-Carleton

Nous sommes les plantes, les créatures aquatiques, ailées, rampantes ainsi que les créatures à quatre pattes vivant dans ce parc et dont les ancêtres ont vécu dans cette partie du territoire Wolastokuk (malécite) pendant des milliers d’années. Ce que nous voulons, aujourd’hui, c’est qu’un tribunal du Nouveau-Brunswick désigne cette partie de Wolastokuk – notre territoire - comme notre sanctuaire. 


Des membres de nos familles élargies, le Kci-Putuwosultihtit Wolastoqiyik (Grand Conseil malécite),  soumettront notre cause au tribunal plus tard ce mois-ci. De tout temps, les Wolastoqewiyik (le peuple malécite) ont été nos protecteurs et ils le seront toujours. Le grand chef du Kci-Putuwosultihtit Wolastoqiyik, Ron Tremblay, accompagné de Jean Louis Deveau, un co-fondateur des Amis du mont Carleton et ancien directeur du parc, interviendra en notre nom. Notre avocat est Gordon Allen de Dartmouth en Nouvelle-Écosse. 


Notre lutte pour préserver notre territoire pour toutes nos relations en contestant en cour la décision de transformer nos terres en un centre d’entretien centralisé pour motoneiges va coûter des milliers de dollars de la monnaie qu’utilisent les humains. L’économie de la terre, de l’air et de l’eau où nous habitons ne reposant pas sur le système monétaire des humains mais plutôt sur la lumière du soleil, nous ne disposons pas d’argent. 


C’est pourquoi nous avons besoin de l’aide d’amis comme vous pour gagner cette bataille juridique. Nous vous lançons donc un appel à vous, créatures à deux pattes compatissantes, qui comprenez que nous sommes tous étroitement reliés dans le cercle de la vie et qui êtes favorables à la préservation de notre mode de vie ici ou ailleurs sur le territoire Wolastokuk, pour que vous nous aidiez, par vos dons, à défrayer nos frais juridiques.  


Vos dons, peu importe le montant, peuvent être faits en ligne sur notre page Go Fund Me ou envoyés par la poste à Grand Conseil Malécite, a/s Alma Brooks, 50, promenade Maliseet, Fredericton, Nouveau-Brunswick, E3A 2V9.


Be Happy for Sparrows

Workshop and Field Trip with Roger Leblanc

Saturday June 11, 2016

It’s a fact that when you are starting out in birding there are some groups of birds that are harder than others to wrap you mind or binoculars around. Some beginners don’t even want to talk about flycatchers or gulls. And it’s true that some birds could drive you to get interested in plants! But there is a much easier group of birds that still gives people a lot of problems. The sparrows or LBJs (for “little brown jobs”) are birds that are relatively easy to find, don’t tend to hide that much, show fairly good field marks, and have recognizable songs. But still, identifying them will give most people a hard time at first. Why? Well as the LBJ nickname suggests they don’t have a lot of colors, they are relatively close to each other in size and there are a fair number of species to pick from.

But don’t despair -- help is on the way. Nature Moncton is offering a hands-on workshop on sparrows. Starting with a short one-hour indoor refresher on the sparrows of NB we will then head outdoors to the Riverview Marsh where we will concentrate on sparrows to try to put in practice what you have learned inside. The objective will be to find in the field as many as we can of the 7 or 8 species that can be found fairly easily in the region at this time of the year. Our own Roger Leblanc will lead this workshop / outing and will share with us the tricks of the trade that he has honed over the years for putting names on the pesky LBJ’S. Things like song, habitat, behavior and head pattern will be pointed out and studied in the hope that the LBJs will become ETCs (easy to call).

And in addition to sparrows, there are always many more other birds, including lots of waterfowl, on the marsh – so we may be surprised by other interesting species!

Saturday June 11, 8:00 to 9:00 (workshop); 9:30 to 12:00 (field)

**Workshop will be held in Community room at the Riverview Sobey’s, 1160 Findlay Blvd., Riverview

Registration with Louise Nichols at nicholsl@eastlink.ca. 

Phone: 939-9054.

Cost of workshop/field trip is $8 payable at the door . All are welcome, Nature Moncton member or not.


 
Bio Banner Fra

Le mardi 18 mai 2016

(Fredericton, N.-B.) Afin de souligner le 22 mai, qui a été désigné la Journée internationale de la biodiversité par les Nations Unies, des groupes au Nouveau-Brunswick désirent souligner qu’ils placent une valeur importante sur la beauté de la nature et des espaces sauvages avec le lancement d’un nouveau logo.  Ce logo, avec l’inscription « Vivre la Nature : Ensemble pour la biodiversité du Nouveau-Brunswick », aidera à intégrer la biodiversité dans la province, ce qui est précisément le thème présenté cette année pour cette journée.

Le logo a été conçu afin de créer une sensibilisation à l’importance de la diversité de la vie sauvage au Nouveau-Brunswick et de renforcer l’intérêt de la population dans la préservation.  Ce logo peut être utilisé par les groupes et les individus qui veulent célébrer la biodiversité et démontrer leur esprit de collaboration pour faire progresser la conservation et la surveillance.  Ce logo a été créé par les groupes impliqués dans le Collectif sur la biodiversité du Nouveau-Brunswick.

« Il existe plusieurs différents groupes dans la province qui travaillent pour la préservation de la diversité de la vie que ce soit par la conservation des habitats, la présentation de plaidoyers, la préparation de recherches, la surveillance, l’éducation ou par d’autres moyens, » rappelle Jessica Bradford de la Fondation pour la protection des sites naturels du Nouveau-Brunswick.  « Nous voulons attirer l’attention vers ces efforts, en plus de les relier et démontrer notre solidarité à poursuivre le but commun de garantir la survie d’une vaste gamme de plantes et d’animaux dans un avenir durable.  Nous encourageons tous les groupes ayant des projets concernant la biodiversité à utiliser ce logo dans leur matériel de communication et leurs ressources. »

Plusieurs groupes de la province montrent déjà leur appui à cette initiative en affichant ce logo sur leur site Web, en l’insérant dans leurs publications relatives à la biodiversité, et en le faisant connaitre sur les médias sociaux avec des messages d’information sur la biodiversité et sur notre riche héritage naturel.

Par ailleurs, les Parcs provinciaux du Nouveau-Brunswick vont incorporer ce logo dans leur Livre vert, une ressource pour l’éducation en plein air.

« Certes, le concept de biodiversité est large et peut être difficile à transmettre aux gens, » constate Vanessa Roy-McDougall, de Nature NB.  « La variété dans la nature est un aspect absolument essentiel pour que les environnements soient sains et les personnes en santé, il est donc important que les divers groupes qui travaillent pour faire progresser la biodiversité travaillent ensemble et transmettent un message cohérent. »

Exemples de groupes qui utilisent le logo :
  • Fondation pour la protection des sites naturels du Nouveau-Brunswick présente le logo dans le défilement des photos sur la bannière principale de leur page Web. On l’utilise aussi au pied de chaque page.
  • Nature NB a préparé une nouvelle section sur leur site Web consacrée à la biodiversité avec le logo.
  • Le Conseil de conservation du Nouveau-Brunswick l’utilise dans les médias sociaux et autre documentation.
  • Réserve de biosphère de Fundy a ajouté le logo sur leur site Web.
  • Meduxnekeag River Association a ajouté le logo sur leur site Web.
  • Alliance du bassin versant Petitcodiac a publié le logo sur son site Web, avec un blogue et un article de promotion sur Facebook.
  • Vision H2O a ajouté le logo sur les affiches des sentiers à l’Ecoparc Cormier-Village et ils vont promouvoir le logo au cours de leurs activités estivales.
  • Société d’aménagement de la rivière Madawaska et du lac Témiscouata inc. a inséré le logo sur leur site Web.
  • L’Association des pêcheurs récréatifs du sud-est inc. présente le logo au pied de la page d’accueil de leur site Web.
  • Le Centre Falls Brook a ajouté le logo aux sections biodiversité et éducation de leur site Web et ils vont écrire un blogue sur l’importance de la biodiversité pour l’agriculture.
De plus, pour célébrer la Journée internationale pour la biodiversité et l’initiative de ce collectif, la Fondation pour la protection des sites naturels du Nouveau-Brunswick, Nature N-B et le Conseil de conservation du Nouveau-Brunswick organisent un évènement en collaboration avec un photographe primé et photojournaliste de la nature Nick Hawkins et avec un herpétologiste et associé de recherche au Musée du Nouveau-Brunswick, Greg Jongsma, le mercredi 25 mai à Fredericton.

« Nous avons beaucoup de chance de pouvoir voir des baleines sauter dans la baie de Fundy et de voir des pygargues survoler nos rivières.  Nous pouvons marcher sous d’anciens pins et explorer des terres humides remplies de faune, d’une variété de petites libellules aux orignaux géants, » fait remarquer Nadine Ives du Conseil de conservation du Nouveau-Brunswick.  « La Journée internationale pour la biodiversité nous donne l’occasion de réfléchir et de célébrer la nature. »
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À propos de la biodiversité : diversité biologique ou en bref biodiversité, se réfère à la variété de toutes les formes de vie, ainsi qu’aux écosystèmes et aux processus naturels qui les supportent.  La province du Nouveau-Brunswick a préparé une stratégie provinciale qui se concentre sur la conservation de la biodiversité et sur l’utilisation de ressources biologiques d’une manière durable.  La stratégie provinciale, qui s’insère dans la Stratégie canadienne de la biodiversité, a été mise en place pour appuyer les obligations du Canada envers la Convention des Nations Unies sur la diversité biologique, qui contient un plan stratégique pour la biodiversité, y inclus les cibles Aichi pour la biodiversité pour la période 2011-2020.

À propos du Collectif pour la biodiversité du Nouveau-Brunswick : Le Collectif pour la biodiversité au Nouveau-Brunswick est un effort conjoint pour s’occuper de la protection de la biodiversité et des espèces en péril.  Le but du collectif est de travailler en collaboration pour améliorer la surveillance des activités sur place et pour fournir une approche complète pour la protection de la biodiversité dans la province.  Les agences impliquées sont variées ; le collectif réunit des citoyens des groupes environnementaux et de conservation, des agences des gouvernements fédéral, de la province et des municipalités, des chercheurs et des professeurs, des planificateurs des régions rurales et municipales, et des entreprises afin qu’ils travaillent tous dans un esprit de coopération mutuelle.

Personnes ressources pour les médias :
·         Mary Ann Coleman, Réseau environnemental du Nouveau-Brunswick, 506-433-6101, maryann.coleman@nben.ca
·         Raissa Marks, Réseau environnemental du Nouveau-Brunswick, 506-855-4144, raissa.marks@nben.ca 

Entrevues bilingues :
·         Vanessa Roy-McDougall, Nature NB, 506-459-4209, executive.director@naturenb.ca
·         Nadine Ives, Conseil de conservation du Nouveau-Brunswick, 506-458-8747,nadine@conservationcouncil.ca
·         Megan de Graaf, Réserve de biosphère Fundy, 506-459-4209,executive.director@fundy-biosphere.ca
·         Christine McLaughlan, Alliance du bassin versant Petitcodiac, 506-384-3369, executivedirector@petitcodiacwatershed.org
·         Johanne Paquette, Vision H2O, 506-577-2071, info@visionh2o.com
·         Joanie Dubé, Société d’aménagement de la rivière Madawaska et du lac Témiscouata inc., 506-739-1992, jdube_sarmlt@nb.aibn.com
·         Darlene Elward, Association des pêcheurs récréatifs du sud-est inc., 506-576-2118, aprse@nb.aibn.com 

Entrevues en anglais :
·         Jessica Bradford, Fondation pour la protection des sites naturels du Nouveau-Brunswick, 506-457-2398, communications@ntnb.org
·         Simon Mitchell, Meduxnekeag River Association, 506-238-4429, simon@meduxnekeag.org
·         Michelle Lavery, Falls Brook Centre,506-454-5480, media@fallsbrookcentre.ca
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE (French follows)

Total signatures presented: 12,686!
 
MEDIA RELEASE

May 17, 2015

11,000 Signature Petition Presentation To Stop Herbicide Spraying in New Brunswick Public Forests and NB Power right-of-ways

FREDERICTON - On Wednesday, May 18, 2016, 11,868 signatures will be presented to MLAs for tabling at the Provincial Legislature to stop spraying of public forests and NB Power right of ways in New Brunswick. This second petition represents communities from every part of the province including francophone, anglophone and Indigenous communities. The petition drive will continue with future presentations planned later this year. 

A delegation of community organizers representing “Stop Spraying in New Brunswick” (SSNB) will be travelling to Fredericton from communities across New Brunswick to present a petition with (NUMBER) signatures to provincial politicians:

Petition Presentation:  Stop The Spraying of Glyphosate Herbicides
Wednesday, May 18, 2016
12:00noon - 1:00pm
In front of the Provincial Legislature Buildings
706 Queen Street
Fredericton, New Brunswick

The Stop Spraying NB movement has been growing rapidly since the recent hunting season found that there are almost no deer in our public forests. A catastrophic deer collapse was underway, with the deer population now one-quarter what it was 30 years ago.  A petition campaign which was started on December 16, 2015 with an initial submission of almost 1200 signatures from Kedgwick.

Two MLAs, David Coon (Fredericton South) and Gilles Lepage (Restigouche West) will be meeting SSNB representatives to accept and table the petition at the Legislature. They have both stated that they will sign the petition as well.

Recent data from Maine Inland F&W, Quebec Chasse et peche, NSDNR and NBDNR shows that hunting numbers in NB are now 15% of what they were in 1985, whereas in Quebec the numbers have increased threefold and in Maine they have stayed relatively stable over the same period of time. The combination of increased clearcutting and glyphosate spraying of monoculture softwood plantations are eliminating a very large amount of deer food, removing enough browse to feed 32,000 deer each and every year.  People who live near or in the woods have noticed the effects on the deer population in New Brunswick themselves.
 
David Ward, an avid outdoorsman and writer for the on-line magazine Wilderness Obsession has noticed the effects on the deer population in NB and draws a correlation with the fate of monarch butterflies : “It is time that we, as caring citizens of New Brunswick, recognize the monarch butterfly as the proverbial “canary in the coal-mine” that it truly is!  Just as using glyphosate to remove milkweed has destroyed an entire population of butterfly, removing hardwoods and shrubs from our forests in favour of new growth monocultures is having a devastating effect on Whitetail Deer and a number of other species.  We need to stand up and recognize how important this is, before it’s too late.”

Wildlife guide Leo Goguen from Rogersville is out in the woods all the time and says,  "Our livelihood depends on hunting wildlife and fowl. Irving not only poisoned the meat we eat but destroyed multiple game habitat that this game depends on to reproduce and strive. We are losing revenue on recreational activities and our families are being robbed of healthy food."

“The spraying of glyphosate converts our mixed Acadian Forests into boreal forests, consisting of conifers only. “ says André Arpin, retired canoe-outfitter from Kedgwick, “This kind of vegetation is more at risk of forest fires like we saw latety in Fort McMurray. With climate change, If we favour only one monoculture and if our new climate doesn't choose conifers, the risk of ruining our provincial economy is greater."

Charles Theriault lives in Kedgwick, one area of the many affected by glyphosate spraying. Charles is connected to many New Brunswickers all over and says, “If government does not address these petitioners concern, they can expect a ramping up of upheaval in this province.”

The acting Chief Medical Officer of New Brunswick, Dr. Jennifer Russell has been contacted by various groups including Stop Spraying NB on the status of the glyphosate report which was started by Dr. Eilish Cleary before she was terminated in the Fall of 2015. New Brunswickers deserve to know.


 Please arrange to meet members of Stop Spraying New Brunswick and other New Brunswickers who are alarmed about the continued use of these sprays outside the legislature buildings on Wednesday May 18, 2016 at noon. All political leaders and MLA's are invited to attend.


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MEDIA CONTACTS:
Peter Gilbert, Smithfield: (506)261-1840
Dr. Caroline Lubbe-D’Arcy, Fredericton: (506)292-7503
André Arpin, Kedgwick : (506)284-2769/(506)284- 0054



PETITION TO THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY OF NEW BRUNSWICK
TO THE HONOURABLE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY OF NEW BRUNSWICK, ASSEMBLED:
 
Whereas approximately 13,000 ha of New Brunswick Crown forest are sprayed every year with herbicides to kill hardwoods and plants that compete with seedlings in plantations;



Whereas spraying herbicides to kill broad leaf trees and shrubs in young conifer plantations destroys the food source and habitats of forest wildlife;



Whereas glyphosates, the herbicide used in New Brunswick Crown forest silviculture, has been labelled a probable human carcinogen by the World Health Organization's International Agency for Research on Cancer in 2015;



Whereas the province of Quebec, with approximately 90 per cent of its forested land under public ownership, banned herbicide spraying of its public forest in 2001 in light of public health concerns;



Whereas replacing the use of herbicides in Crown forest with thinning crews of people working in the woods
- as Quebec has done since 2001 - would ensure more jobs from our forest resource;


Whereas the Auditor General of New Brunswick attributed the annual forest deficit ($7-$10 million for each of the last five years) to the costly silviculture program in a report tabled to the N.B. Legislature in June 2015.  At a cost of about $1,000/hectare, herbicide spraying contributes to N.B.'s annual forest deficit and prevents natural forest regeneration;
 
Whereas there is a widespread public opposition to the spraying of the forest in New Brunswick.  Three petitions against spraying the forest have been tabled in the New Brunswick Legislature in just over ten years.
 
The petition of the undersigned requests that NB MLAs support a ban on the spraying of glyphosates in Crown forest management in New Brunswick.


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POUR DIFFUSION IMMÉDIATE

 
COMMUNIQUÉ DE PRESSE

 
17 mai 2016

Présentation de plus de 11000 signatures de Pétition de Stop Spraying NB/ Arrêtons l’arrosage NB pour l’arrêt de l'arrosage d'herbicides sur les forêts publiques du Nouveau-Brunswick ainsi que sur les droits de passage d’ Énergie NB.

FREDERICTON - Le mercredi 18 mai 2016, 11856 signatures seront présentées aux députés pour le dépôt à l'Assemblée législative provinciale pour arrêter l’épandage d’herbicides sur les forêts publiques du NB et sur les droits de passage d’Energie NB. Cette deuxième pétition, provenant de toutes les régions de la province, inclue les régions francophones, anglophones et les communautés autochtones. La campagne pour ramasser des signatures de cette pétition se poursuivra avec des présentations futures prévues plus tard cette année.

Une délégation d'organisateurs communautaires représentant « Stop Spraying NB/Arrêtons l’arrosage NB », provenant de partout dans la province, se rendra à Fredericton pour présenter une pétition de 11856 signatures aux politiciens provinciaux:

Présentation de la pétition: Arrêtons l’arrosage des herbicides glyphosate
Mercredi 18 mai 2016
12:00(midi) - 13:00
Devant les bâtiments de l’Assemblée législative
706, rue Queen
Fredericton, Nouveau-Brunswick

Le mouvement Stop Spraying/Arrêtons l’arrosage NB a connu une croissance rapide depuis la dernière saison de chasse qui a démontrée qu'il n'y a presque plus de chevreuils dans nos forêts publiques. Un effondrement catastrophique du cheptel de chevreuils est en cours, la population du chevreuil étant maintenant le quart de ce qu'il était il y a 30 ans. Une campagne pour ramasser des signatures de pétition a alors débuté le 16 Décembre 2015, avec le lancement de près de 1200 signatures provenant de la communauté rurale de Kedgwick.

Deux députés, David Coon (Fredericton-Sud) et Gilles Lepage (Restigouche-Ouest) ont accepté de rencontrer des représentants de Stop Spraying/Arrêtons l’arrosage NB et de déposer cette pétition à l'Assemblée législative. Ils ont tous deux déclaré qu'ils vont également signer la pétition.

Des données récentes du Maine Inland Fisheries and Wildlife , Québec Chasse et Pêche, Ministère des ressources naturelles de la N.E. et du N.B. démontrent que le nombre de captures au Nouveau-Brunswick sont maintenant 15% de ce qu'elles étaient en 1985, alors qu'au Québec, les chiffres ont triplé et dans le Maine, ils sont restés relativement stables au cours de la même période. La combinaison de l'augmentation de la coupe à blanc et de l’arrosage de glyphosates dans les plantations de monocultures de résineux éliminent une très grande quantité de nourriture de cerfs, soit l’approvisionnement en nourriture de 32,000 chevreuils et cela, chaque année. Les gens qui vivent à proximité ou dans les bois ont, eux-mêmes, remarqué les effets sur la population du chevreuil au Nouveau-Brunswick.

David Ward, un amateur de plein air et écrivain pour le magazine en ligne Wilderness Obsession, a remarqué les effets sur la population de cerfs au Nouveau-Brunswick et en tire une corrélation avec le sort des papillons monarques: "Il est temps que nous, en tant que citoyens bienveillants du Nouveau-Brunswick , reconnaissons le papillon monarque comme le «canari dans la mine de charbon" qu'il est vraiment! Tout comme l'utilisation du glyphosate pour éliminer l'asclépiade a détruit toute une population de papillons, enlever les feuillus et les arbustes de nos forêts pour favoriser la croissance de nouvelles monocultures a un effet dévastateur sur le cerf de Virginie et un certain nombre d'autres espèces. Nous devons nous tenir debout et reconnaître à quel point cela est important, avant qu'il ne soit trop tard".

Leo Goguen, guide de la faune de Rogersville, passe une bonne partie de son temps en forêt et dit: "Notre subsistance dépend de la chasse de la faune et de la volaille. Irving a non seulement empoisonné la viande que nous mangeons, mais détruit l'habitat multiple de jeu dont ils dépendent pour se reproduire et survivre. Nous perdons les revenus sur ces activités récréatives et nos familles se font voler de la nourriture saine".

"Le glyphosate transforme nos forêts acadiennes mixtes en forêts boréales, composées uniquement de conifères.", dit André Arpin, opérateur touristique retraité de Kedgwick, "Ce type de végétation est plus à risque d'incendies de forêt, comme nous l'avons vu dernièrement à Fort McMurray. Avec les changements climatiques, si nous favorisons une seule monoculture et si notre nouveau climat ne choisit pas les conifères, le risque de ruiner l'économie provinciale est plus grande."

Charles Thériault vit à Kedgwick, une des nombreuses zones touchées par l’arrosage du glyphosate. Charles est en lien avec de nombreux Néo-Brunswickois partout dans la province et dit: "Si le gouvernement ne répond pas aux préoccupations de ces pétitionnaires, ils peuvent s’ attendre à une montée en puissance de bouleversement dans cette province."

Le médecin hygiéniste en chef par intérim du Nouveau-Brunswick, le Dr Jennifer Russell, a été contacté par divers groupes, y compris Stop Spraying/Arrêtons l’arrosage NB, sur l'état du rapport de glyphosate qui a été commencé par le Dr Eilish Cleary avant qu'elle ne soit mise à pied à l'automne 2015. Les Néo-Brunswickois ont le droit de savoir.

S'il vous plaît prendre des dispositions pour rencontrer les membres de Stop Spraying/Arrêtons l’arrosage Nouveau-Brunswick et d'autres Néo-Brunswickois qui sont énormément préoccupés par l'utilisation continue de ces herbicides, à l'extérieur des bâtiments à l’assemblée législative le mercredi 18 mai 2016 à midi. Tous les dirigeants politiques et les députés provinciaux sont invités à assister.

PERSONNES CONTACTS

Peter Gilbert, Smithfield: (506)261-1840

Dr. Caroline Lubbe-D’Arcy, Fredericton: (506)292-7503

André Arpin, Kedgwick : (506)284-2769/(506)284- 0054


PÉTITION À L’ASSEMBLÉE LÉGISLATIVE DU NOUVEAU-BRUNSWICK
À L’HONORABLE ASSEMBLÉE LÉGISLATIVE DU NOUVEAU-BRUNSWICK

Attendu qu’approximativement 13,000 hectares des forêts des terres de la Couronne sont arrosés chaque année avec des herbicides pour tuer le bois dur et les plantes qui rivalisent  avec les jeunes pousses des  plantations;


Attendu que l’arrosage d’herbicides pour tuer les feuillus et les arbustes dans les plantations de jeunes conifères détruit les sources de nourriture et les habitats des animaux sauvages;


Attendu que le glyphosate, l’herbicide utilisé  sur les terres de la Couronne au Nouveau-Brunswick, a été déclaré un cancérogène probable pour les humains en 2015 par le Centre international de recherche sur le cancer créé par l’Organisation mondiale de la santé;

Attendu que la province de Québec, avec approximativement 90 pour cent de ses forêts qui sont publiques, ont interdit  l’arrosage sur ses forêts publiques en 2001 à cause des préoccupations au niveau de la santé;


Attendu que remplacer l’utilisation d’herbicides sur les forêts de la Couronne par des équipes de travailleurs en forêt-tout comme l’a fait le Québec en 2001-assurerait plus d’emplois provenant de nos ressources forestières;


Attendu que la Vérificatrice générale du Nouveau-Brunswick a attribué le  déficit annuel de nos forêt ($7-$10 millions pour chacune des 5 dernières années) au coût du programme actuel de sylviculture dans un rapport remis à l’Assemblée législative du Nouveau-Brunswick en juin 2015. Au coût d’environ $1,000/hectare, l’arrosage d’herbicides contribue au déficit annuel des forêts du Nouveau-Brunswick et empêche la régénération naturelle de la forêt;


Attendu qu’il y a une vaste opposition du public à l’arrosage des forêts du Nouveau-Brunswick: trois pétitions contre l’arrosage de la forêt ont été remises à l’Assemblée législative du Nouveau-Brunswick dans les derniers 10 ans.

Les signataires de la pétition demandent  que les Membres de l’assemblée  législative du Nouveau-Brunswick supportent d’interdire l’arrosage de glyphosates dans la gestion des terres de la Couronne au Nouveau-Brunswick.
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
May 3, 2016

Conservation Council's ecologist set to help NB teachers who want to take their classes outside
(Fredericton) — The Conservation Council’s Learning Outside Coordinator, Nadine Ives, will join Emma McIntyre of Nature NB for an in-depth nature education training session for New Brunswick elementary teachers in Moncton this week.

CCNB-N_Ives_outdoors_with_class_(nov_2015)_.jpgThousands of teachers will participate in three different professional development days across the province on May 6 organized by the New Brunswick Teachers Association. The Elementary Council Day takes at the Bernice MacNaughton High School and Wesleyan Celebration Centre in Moncton and Ives says she is looking forward to one of her favourite days of the year.

“This will be the third time I’ve helped take our shared Great Minds Think Outside professional development training to the NBTA’s Council Day participants,” said Ives, who has a PhD in ecology and has been involved in nature education in various forms for over 20 years.

“Feedback from participants is always very positive and I expect the same creative responses from our teachers this week, “says Ives. “I have found that our NB teachers are enthusiastic leaders when it comes to building outside activities into their lesson plans. “

The Conservation Council’s Learning Outside program helps New Brunswick’s children re-connect with nature by developing creative ways to integrate nature into the teaching of all subjects through the development of outdoor learning spaces and provision of teacher training opportunities.

Great Minds Think Outside is a hands-on, curriculum-linked, outdoor professional development program that gives teachers and educators the skills, tools, and resources they need to teach their students outside in nature. Launched in September 2015 by members of the NB Sustainability Education Alliance, the training is offered in both official languages and can be tailored to teachers of all grade levels.

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More information

Photo Caption: CCNB's Nadine Ives and elementary students explore the scents of the forest. 


To learn more about the Conservation Council’s Learning Outside project, check out the website atwww.learningoutside.ca

To learn more about the Great Minds Think Outside program, see www.nben.ca/greatminds.

To learn more about the NBTA’s Elementary Council Day program, see http://www.nbta.ca/councils-online-2016/elementary/pdfs/2016_EC_program.pdf

To arrange an interview, contact: Nadine Ives, 458-8747. Email: nadine.ives@conservationcouncil.ca

 



Le 1er mars dernier, le RENB, en partenariat avec le Réseau d’action sur la sécurité alimentaire du NB et De le ferme à la cafétéria Canada, a organisé une conférence provinciale afin d’explorer les liens entre la sécurité alimentaire, l’éducation et la durabilité.

La sécurité alimentaire est un nouveau thème pour l’Alliance pour l’éducation à la viabilité du Nouveau-Brunswick (AÉV-NB), mais a tout de même été très bien reçu. Plus de 80 participants représentant des écoles, des districts scolaires, des institutions postsecondaires, des ONG, des banques alimentaires et des ministères étaient présents.

Durant la journée, les participants ont eu la chance d’entendre parler de certaines initiatives excitantes sur la sécurité alimentaires qui sont en cours dans la province, ont joué et appris en plein air avec l’équipe Les grands penseurs se rencontrent dehors et sont repartis avec des idées plein la tête suite à d’excellentes discussions et une présentation fantastique par le conférencier Michael Carr.

Merci à nos partenaires et à tous ceux qui ont contribué à la planification et à l’organisation de cet évènement.

Vous pouvez lire le rapport ici!
FREDERICTON – A citizens’ group in Fredericton is asking why Mayor Brad Woodside and City Council sent a Letter of Support for the proposed TransCanada Energy East Pipeline Project to the Prime Minister of Canada, Justin Trudeau, and kept it secret from the citizens of Fredericton.

Fredericton’s drinking water would be at risk from an Energy East pipeline spill as identified in the Drinking Water Report released on April 6th. A detailed analysis of the proposed Energy East pipeline route shows that across Canada the project could lead to the contamination of crucial sources of drinking water not identified in TransCanada’s application.

“Our City Councillors have a duty of care to ask about the risks and impacts of this export tar sands pipeline proposed to cross over or beside our rivers, bays, and drinking water supplies,” says Garry Guild, a member from the Fredericton chapter of the Council of Canadians.

“We are disappointed to learn that our City Council approved and sent this Letter of Support for this very controversial issue in the absence of an open and transparent debate during a regular Council meeting in which Frederictonians are allowed to attend,” says Caroline Lubbe-D’Arcy, a member of the Fredericton chapter of the Council of Canadians. “This is more than just about a pipeline. It’s about public trust and the integrity of our elected officers. Decisions affecting the public being made secretly behind closed doors have no place in 2016.”

The decision also contradicts the position of the Wolastoq Grand Council which recently announced on February 8th their opposition to the Energy East pipeline. The pipeline would traverse their unceded traditional homeland through the Saint John River watershed, including the headwaters of the Nashwaak River which is north of Fredericton.

To date, the following one-sentence statement is the only response that members of the local chapter have received from the City Clerk’s Office of the City of Fredericton:

“The City of Fredericton was approached by the Canadian Chamber of Commerce for a letter of support in relation to Trans Canada’s Energy East Project; and a letter was sent by Mayor Woodside, on behalf of City Council, to the Prime Minister of Canada confirming support.” (City Clerk’s Office, e-mail received April 05, 2016)

“With impending municipal elections (Monday, May 9th), the citizens of Fredericton need to vote for a Mayor and Councillors who are both accountable and transparent. This is how they gain our trust”, says Joan Green, a member of the Fredericton chapter of the Council of Canadians.The Fredericton chapter of the Council of Canadians has launched a ‘Publicly Take Back The Letter’ campaign asking Fredericton City Council to publicly withdraw the letter before or at their Monday, April 25th meeting @ 7:30pm, the final Regular Meeting of City Council prior to the May 9th municipal election.
Le 12 février dernier, plus de 60 praticiens de l’adaptation aux changements climatiques de partout dans la province et d’ailleurs se sont rencontrés pour échanger et partager de l’information sur des outils et le travail lié à l’adaptation. Dans le contexte de la nouvelle attention globale accordée aux changements climatiques, la conférence a également fourni une plateforme pour permettre aux groupes de penser stratégiquement aux occasions futures.

Au courant de la journée, les participants ont entendu parler de quelques initiatives fantastiques sur l’adaptation qui sont en cours au NB et on pu avoir un bon aperçu des occasions pour collaborer sur l’adaptation aux changements climatiques au niveau régional, provincial et fédéral.

C’est aussi une période très excitante pour le Collectif sur l’adaptation aux changements climatiques comme plusieurs actions concrètes en lien avec les priorités identifiées lors d’ateliers antérieurs commencent à voir le jour. Lors de la conférence, les participants ont discuté de comment ils pourraient travailler ensemble sur les priorités suivantes :

-Maintenir un réseau et appuyer les partenariats pour faire progresser l’adaptation aux changements climatiques dans la province.

-S’assurer que les recherches, les données et les outils appropriés sont partagés par les partenaires d’un collectif et largement répandus dans les secteurs.

-Appuyer les approches éducatives et de communications centrées sur l’adaptation aux changements climatiques.

-Encourager et appuyer l’intégration de la planification à tous les niveaux pour témoigner de l’adaptation aux changements climatiques et de la nécessité d’inclure les valeurs économiques, sociales, culturelles et écologiques.

-Promouvoir les infrastructures vertes à titre d’options viables pour l’adaptation aux changements climatiques.

Il y a maintenant trois équipes actives sous l’égide du Collective: infrastructure verte, éducation et planification.

L’évènement a été organisé en collaboration avec les membres du comité directeur du collectif sur l’adaptation aux changements climatiques. Un gros merci aux présentatrices et présentateurs, aux participants et aux membres du comité qui ont fait de cette journée un succès.

Vous pouvez consulter le rapport ici! 




Select Committee engages all New Brunswickers in growing the green economy

FREDERICTON —
 Establishing a Select Committee on Climate Change is an excellent step toward engaging all New Brunswickers in the important work of growing our economy and protecting our communities from extreme weather and sea level rise.

The Legislative Assembly voted unanimously in support of a motion to establish the all-party committee on Friday, April 9. The Conservation Council applauds the members of the House and looks forward to participating in this public process.

“This is an opportunity to let all New Brunswickers get involved in the plan to move us smoothly and successfully toward a low-carbon economy,” says Executive Director Lois Corbett.

Select committees are a way for government to include all New Brunswickers in the investigation of important subjects. Select committees report to all members of the legislative assembly and typically hold public hearings where citizens, government officials and expert witnesses are invited to appear.

The motion, introduced by Environment Minister Brian Kenny, states: “The government recognizes that investing in clean technology solutions, especially in areas such as renewable energy, energy efficiency, and cleaner energy production and use, holds great promise for sustainable economic development and long-term job creation.”

It also recognizes climate change as the single most significant challenge of our generation, stating: “New Brunswick is already experiencing impacts of climate change, including sea level rise, extreme rainfall events, coastal and inland flooding, more coastal erosion, heat waves, some migration of invasive species, and diseases.”

The motion asks the Select Committee to hold public consultations and gives it the power to meet, hold hearings, and release a report whether the House is sitting or not.

While commending government for introducing the motion, Corbett urges legislators and committee members to move quickly on this important work. “The committee should focus on putting New Brunswick’s best foot forward as the federal government continues work on the national climate plan,” she says.

“As Minister Kenny says in his motion, acting on the challenge of climate change won’t just protect us from the impacts communities are already experiencing — it’s the best course of action to create jobs in our province,” Corbett concludes.

The Select Committee on Climate Change is composed of: Andrew Harvey (Lib), the Member for Carleton-Victoria; Bernard LeBlanc (Lib), the Member for Memramcook-Tantramar; Monique LeBlanc (Lib), the Member for Moncton East, John Ames (Lib), the Member for Charlotte-Campobello; Wilfred Roussel (Lib), the Member for Shippagan-Lamèque-Miscou, Jody Carr (PC), the Member for Oromocto- Lincoln, Brian Keirstead (PC), the Member for Albert; and David Coon (Green), the Member for Fredericton South.

Read the motion here.
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To arrange an interview, contact: Jon MacNeill, Communications. Officer: 458-8747; Cell: 261-1353; Email: jon.macneill@conservationcouncil.ca
Ken Hardie est décédé le 1er avril 2016. Ken se dévouait aux forêts du Nouveau-Brunswick et a travaillé sans relâche à l’amélioration des politiques forestières. Par l’entremise de son travail, il avait bâti de fortes relations avec les gens de la communauté environnementale dans toutes les régions de la province. Il était directeur général de la Fédération des propriétaires de lots boisés du Nouveau-Brunswick et s’est impliqué dans la Coopérative forestière du sud du Nouveau-Brunswick, dans la commercialisation du bois du sud du Nouveau-Brunswick et dans le programme de travail des lots boisés du sud du Nouveau-Brunswick. Ken a été membre fondateur de la Fiducie foncière communautaire du Nouveau-Brunswick. Ken manquera énormément à tous ceux qui travaillent sur les enjeux forestiers. Nous offrons nos condoléances à sa famille et à ses amis.



Nécrologie (disponible en anglais seulement)

Kenneth Thomas Laing Hardie
1953-2016

Ken Hardie of Kars, NB, loving husband of Deborah Boles, passed away peacefully on April 1, 2016 at Saint John Regional Hospital. Born August 22, 1953, in Montreal, Ken was the son of John Laing Hardie (Selkirk, MB) and the late Alice Thompson.

Ken grew up in Dollard des Ormeaux, QC, attended high school in Pointe Claire, and university at Sir George Williams in Montreal. In 1971 Ken migrated east to study science and play varsity football at UNB where he made lifelong friendships. After university, Ken put down Maritime roots. He remained in Fredericton where he managed the UNB Student Union and played for the infamous Atlantic Rentals hockey team. However, his life soon changed when he fell in love and married Deborah Boles in 1981. The newlyweds moved to a 230 year old farmhouse in Kars on Belleisle Bay. It was here that Ken found his passion - the forest. He developed a Fundy Model woodlot on his farm and began a storied career in forestry in which he held many positions: executive director of the NB Federation of Woodlot Owners, and leadership roles in the Southern New Brunswick Wood Co-op, the SNB Marketing Board and the SNB Working Woodlot program. Ken was a proud founding member of the New Brunswick Community Land Trust.

Ken Hardie was a humble man of character and integrity who possessed a fine sense of humour. He earned the respect and admiration of all who knew him. He was passionate about environmental stewardship, nature and wildlife. His love of animals, especially his many hounds and cats, was legendary, but above all it was Deborah, his friends and family that mattered most. He will be missed. Ken was predeceased by his cherished Bernese Mountain Dog, Addie.

Besides his wife of 35 years, Ken is survived by his father; sister, Margaret (Gerald Beaudoin) of Havelock, QC; brother, Robert Hardie (Lynn Charette) of Halifax, NS; and brother-in-law, David Boles of Fredericton. Ken was the loving uncle of Mathiew and the late Jean-Luke Beaudoin; and Tyler, Jordyn and Austyn Hardie. He was much loved by cousins, Anne Maura and Mary Alice.

A memorial gathering will be held at McAdam’s Funeral Home on Wednesday, April 6th, 2016, from 1:00 to 5:00 pm. Word of remembrance to celebrate Ken’s life will occur at 3:00 pm followed by a reception. For those who wish, donations may be made in Ken’s memory to the New Brunswick Community Land Trust, the SPCA or a charity of the donor’s choice.

www.mcadamsfh.com

Join Nature NB as we help researchers from across Canada in tracking changes in our Natural Environment! The PlantWatch program enables citizen scientists to get involved by recording flowering times for selected plant species and reporting these dates to researchers, who work to identify ecological changes that may be affecting our environment. No experience needed!
For more information on how to participate, visit our website:


Joignez Nature NB à aider les chercheurs de partout au Canada à suivre les changements dans notre environnement naturel. Le programme AttentionFlore permet à des citoyens scientifiques de participer et d’agir en enregistrant la période de floraison d’espèces de plantes sélectionnées, et en communiquant ces dates aux scientifiques. Aucune experience nécéssaire!
Pour plus d'information visitez notre site web.
The 2016 Festival of Nature Schedule is now available. Discover Restigouche county and surrounding areas the weekend of May 27-29th 2016.

L'horaire du Festival de la Nature 2016 est maintenant disponible. Découvrez comté de Restigouche et ses environs le week-end du 27-29 mai 2016

Schedule/horaire: http://www.naturenb.ca/about-us/2016-festival-of-nature/
Register/inscription: https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/2016-festival-of-nature-festiva…
“Strengthen, not weaken, the protection of our rivers, bays and drinking water”, says New Brunswick groups questioning the government’s Water Strategy

FREDERICTON, N.B. –  On World Water Day, March 22nd,  several citizen groups joined the Wolastoq Grand Council and held a Press Conference today in Fredericton to call on the Gallant government for the immediate halt to the hastily-planned review process for the New Brunswick’s new Water Strategy.  

“The process is a sham.”, says Mark D’Arcy, New Brunswick Energy East Campaigner for the Council of Canadians.  “The Gallant Government is proposing a new strategy to manage our drinking water and waterways with industry and to replace our current water classification regulation.  The process is not democratic.  The process would weaken, not strengthen, our protection of water.  And the process ignores the reality of climate change, that peoples’ lives and communities are at stake.” 

The process is not democratic. 

Brian Kenny, NB Minister of Environment and Local Government, released the Discussion Paper entitled ‘Working Together to Build a Water Strategy for New Brunswick” on March 6th.  Less than two weeks later, six Open Houses in rapid succession have been scheduled to gather people’s input with written feedback welcome until April 29th (see link below to government website).

“Why has there been limited advertising for these Open House consultations and why is the lead time for this input so rushed?,” asks Mark D’Arcy. “Why is the government conducting secret stakeholder meetings with watershed groups and municipalities that excludes the public? And why is there a third tier of secret stakeholder meetings only with industry. You can’t have a democracy with secret meetings. Is this to pave the way for large-scale projects such as Energy East, Sisson Brook, and shale gas fracking? Premier Brian Gallant needs to halt this process now and start an open and meaningful public process.” 

Ann Pohl, Chair of the Council of Canadians – Kent County Chapter says, “We endorse this call for an open, transparent, engaged and valid process to determine water protection policy and regulations.”

Sharlene Paul, Clanmother speaking on behalf of the Wolastoq Grand Council, says, “It is wrong of Premier Brian Gallant to release any Water Strategy without first initiating discussions with our people.  Our recent declarations here in our non-ceded Wolastoq Homeland – the ‘Water Declaration’ last May 2015 in Red Head, and our ‘Declaration of the Rights of Mother Earth’ in February 2016 - are very clear about the importance of water:  The inherent right to water as a source of life.”

The process is going to weaken, not strengthen, our protection of water.

Lawrence Wuest, a retired scientist who lives in the Nashwaak River watershed, asked, “Why is the government disempowering and dismantling at least six (6) current volunteer watershed organizations along the Saint John River?  The new water strategy proposes to exclude from provincial legislation almost all the individual watersheds directly impacted by the Energy East Pipeline, the Sisson Tungsten Mine, the Minco PLC Woodstock Manganese Project, and shale gas development in the great swath of New Brunswick currently under gas and oil exploration license and lease."

Mr. Wuest emphasizes, "This would remove local community control, monitoring and advocacy in the Nashwaak Watershed, the Meduxnekeag Watershed, the Cannan River/Washademoak Lake Watershed, the Belleisle Bay Watershed, the Kennebecasis Watershed, the Hammond River Watershed, and all other existing sub-watersheds of the Saint John River.”

“Why won’t they implement the Watershed Classification System? “, asks Bill Ayer. “This is the same system successfully used by the State of Maine, which would allow NB and ME to easily exchange data on their shared Transboundary watersheds in the St. Croix and St. John River Basins.”

“We must listen to our Ombudsman,” says Margo Sheppard, member of Council of Canadians – Fredericton chapter. “Ombudsman Charles Murray ruled in 2014 that the province’s Water Classification Regulation was legal and that it was reckless not to put it into practice. Ombudsman Murray stressed that this Water Classification was made a strong legal tool by an amendment of the Clean Water Act on December 19, 2008.”

 “The language in the discussion paper with respect to the management and control of water by industry, including ‘water management partnerships’, is too vague and is also very troubling”, says Susan Linkletter, Vice President of the Organic Crop improvement Association, and former Executive Director of the Petitcodiac Watershed Alliance, “The Water Strategy is proposing a triple bottom line, that is, of managing water for people, nature, and business.  Why, when we know the value of clean drinking water, is the Province laying a foundation that would allow for the bulk transport of water between watersheds in New Brunswick, as well as the export of water out of New Brunswick?”, says Jean Louis Deveau, Chair of the Council of Canadians – Fredericton chapter. 

The process ignores the reality of climate change.

“The new Water Strategy ignores the focus on water in the recent NB report of the Commission on Hydraulic Fracturing”, says Maggie Connell, past Co-chair Council of Canadians – Fredericton chapter.  “The Commissioner detailed steps to protect surface water and groundwater, including the “comprehensive mapping and monitoring of New Brunswick’s groundwater aquifers” and “to mitigate the impacts of climate change-related effects, such as extreme weather, on New Brunswick’s watersheds, coasts and land base”.

Our group has consistently warned Premier Gallant and his Ministers of the need to stop the unsustainable forest clear cutting and the destruction of our wetlands,” says Connell. “The environmental protection of our forests and watersheds must be an urgent priority in order to protect downstream communities.”

Marilyn Merritt-Gray a resident of Kars, one of the Belleisle Bay communities hardest hit by the Fall 2015 rain storm, says “We know all about bad roads down here, spring flooding and washouts, but the September storm was overwhelming. The government says they have already spent $15 million on bridge and road reconstruction, but even with that in our roads in places remain barely passable and other roads remain closed. For weeks the river in front of my house ran brown.”

Halt the current Water Strategy process and start over.  

“It’s important that we halt this current process and start over with a more evidence-based document and with an open and transparent process, a process which includes all Indigenous and non-Indigenous communities in New Brunswick and the Chief Medical Officer of Health,” says Russ Letica, First Nation Consultation Coordinator from the Wolastoqiyik Nation.

The last planned meeting for ‘invitation-only stakeholders’ is in Fredericton on Wednesday, March 23rd from 2:00pm-4:00pm at the Fredericton Inn.  The Open House follows at 4:30pm-6:30pm, also at the Fredericton Inn.  We encourage the general public to attend these meetings, ask these important questions and your local concerns about the protection of our water, and ask the Gallant government to halt the current Water Strategy process.  The process should start only after Premier Gallant properly answers these questions.  


                                                       - 30 -

References: 



Managing Water Resources, 3pp - Released March 1, 2016

http://www2.gnb.ca/content/dam/gnb/Departments/env/pdf/Water-Eau/WaterStrategy-StrategieSurLeau/ManagingWaterResources.pdf



Working Towards a Water Strategy for New Brunswick, 24pp – Released March 6, 2016

http://www2.gnb.ca/content/gnb/en/departments/elg/environment/content/water/content/water_strategy.html
Gallant government watering down the protection of our rivers, streams and lakes
by Jean Louis Deveau

At the Peace and Friendship Alliance (PAFA) meeting of March 19th, Lawrence Wuest introduced us to the Gallant government’s proposed new water strategy which is meant to replace our current Water Classification Regulation, NB Regulation 2002-13.

The following is an attempt to explain the differences between the two.

The proposed new water strategy may be found on all of two pages, that is, on pages 17 and 18 of a discussion paper called Working Together to Build a Water Strategy for New Brunswick. It consists of four main goals.

Goal no. 2 of this new water strategy, as quoted from page 17, is: “to manage and use water responsibly by protecting drinking water and eco-system [sic] health while allowing economic opportunities (my emphasis).”

Of concern is that, compared to our current water policy, water will be used for economic development, “now and in the future.” An example of this would be to use water for fracking. In short, the use of water for economic development is now entrenched in the draft water strategy and so on equal footing with the traditional use of water which is to maintain the health of our environments. These two objectives are diametrically opposed. Plus, there is no indication on how water allocations would be made and who would be making those decisions other than that it would be a shared responsibility amongst the consumers, be it corporations or people, large or small.

On page 6 of the new water strategy, the Government stated that it is committed to engage First Nations communities in the discussion and that information will be sent to those communities. According to discussions held at the PAFA meeting, on March 19th, First Nations were not involved in drafting this new water strategy before it was released to the public. And since the provisions of the Government’s own policy on the Duty to Consult Indigenous Peoples requires that First Nations be consulted at the outset, as opposed to after such a policy has been drafted, the government is already in contravention of its own rules and regulations, not to mention Supreme Court of Canada rulings from which their consultation policy is a derivation of.

Our current water classification system as specified in A Guide to New Brunswick’s Water Classification Regulation, and albeit never implemented, has been in existence since 2002. It is designed to protect aquatic life. This is accomplished by way of engaging with community members to collect data on the quality of water in the streams, rivers, and lakes of their respective communities. This data is then used to classify these bodies of water according to three different classes of water: A, B, or C, where class A consists of the highest quality water. Each body of water would then be managed according to its classification. Nobody is permitted to do anything to change a body of water’s classification without receiving permission from members of the local community, thereby making local communities responsible and accountable for the care and use of their water. This is by far one of the most progressive policies in North America yet risks being dismantled by the Gallant government in exchange for their watered-down policy which is the subject of this notification.

There has been a great deal of interest demonstrated from New Brunswick’s communities in classifying bodies of water. Since 2000, more than a million dollars has been dispensed by the Environmental Trust Fund to non-governmental organizations, such as the Nashwaak Watershed Association and the Groupe du bassin versant de la region du Cap Pele, to collect data needed for the classification of some 19 rivers in New Brunswick.

table


Whereas our current water classification system is focused on a single bottom line of ensuring that the conditions necessary to maintain aquatic life are being met, as illustrated in Table 1 above, the triple bottom line of the new water strategy, that is, of managing water for people, nature, and industry is problematic for at least three reasons. First, the incorporation of water as a means for economic growth ultimately leads to the commodification of water.

The commodification of water means that water could be traded on the free market like oil, gas, and other commodities. Should our water become entangled in free trade agreements, this would undoubtedly lead to conflicts on who should have priority over its use: people, nature, or industry. Under the North American Free Trade Agreement, corporations trump all else. Second, the transferring of the responsibility for the care of our water from communities into the hands of consumers, be it people or corporations, means that not only have local communities lost control over their water but that whoever has the most power and influence, in terms of corporations and or other consumers, gets to decide who uses our water. Third, this way of managing our water is not in keeping with the government’s obligations of reconciliation with Indigenous peoples who view water as sacred and who would never accept water being used for economic development.

My second point is about the lack of transparency over this issue. Despite the importance and gravity of this major policy change in water use, public consultations on this new water strategy have been occurring with little to no advertisement, thus making it nearly impossible for interested citizens to become engaged. Appearing in the Gallant Government’s last throne speech, and in a press release which was not picked up by the media, public notifications have not been widely distributed. To date, four open houses have occurred, with only two left to happen this week: Monday in Saint John and Wednesday in Fredericton. The meetings are also happening during supper time, that is, between 4:30 pm and 6:30, making it difficult for many people to attend, particularly those who finish work at 5:00 pm and those with young children in daycare. By way of comparison, the 2012 Citizen Engagement tour for the new oil and natural gas standards were well advertised and took place between 6:30 and 8:30 pm.

And finally, I wish to refer to a comment on page 13 of the new water strategy made in reference to the deficiencies of the current water classification system.

[Department of Environment and Local Government] was advised that deficiencies within this regulation prevented its use to classify surface waters and the program was put on hold. Furthermore DELG received legal advice that suggested attempting to fix this regulation would equate to an entire rewrite of that part of the legislation.

Charles Murray, our Ombudsman did not agree with the concerns expressed above by the Department of Environment and Local Government as stated on pages 5-6 of his report:

At this point, it should be noted that no court has ruled upon the Regulation. Accordingly, the suggestions that the Regulation is void or unenforceable are thus far opinion— perhaps correct, but not having the force of law...The suggestion that there continues to be unaddressed issues about the legality of Regulation 2002-13 12 years after its coming into force strains credulity.

To conclude, the Government is now developing policy that would transform water into a vehicle for economic development. Consultations with Indigenous peoples have not yet occurred and public open houses will have been completed by the time most New Brunswickers will have heard anything about this, leaving the majority of us with few options to make our voices heard on what is undoubtedly our most important and precious resource—water. The closing date for comments on the new water strategy is April 29th and so the time to act is now.

 
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