MONCTON, April 20, 2011 - Like for every federal election, Petitcodiac Riverkeeper submitted a
survey to candidates of ridings surrounding the river, which are Beauséjour, Moncton-Riverview-Dieppe
and Fundy Royal. The Riverkeeper is delighted by the support received, despite the lack of understanding
that seems to exist with the conservative candidates over the issue.

The first question was about their support for the Petitcodiac River Restoration Project. All candidates
support the Petitcodiac River Restoration with the exception of conservative candidates, Rob Moore of
Fundy Royal and Evelyn Chapman of Beauséjour. Without a clear answer, Robert Goguen, Conservative
Party candidate in Moncton-Riverview-Dieppe, wants to wait until the monitoring phase is over " to
evaluate when and how to proceed with the next phase."

The second question concerned the candidates' commitment to ensure that the federal government
financially contributes at least half the cost of the Petitcodiac River Restoration Project. Candidates of the
Liberal Party, NDP and Green Party have responded positively to this question. While the liberal Dominic
LeBlanc believes that “the restoration project of the Petitcodiac River must be completed", conservative
Robert Goguen will ensure federal funding only "if it is the wish of the residents of Moncton-Riverview-
Dieppe and the other levels of government."

According to the Riverkeeper, the Conservative candidates’ position is disappointing. "The federal
government has been a partner in the restoration project since the beginning. Its continued participation is
expected; almost all candidates recognize that” says Marco Morency, executive director of Petitcodiac
Riverkeeper. "We're at the end of a long process that involved the most comprehensive environmental
impact assessment ever conducted in New Brunswick. The federal government is engaged in this process
and it has to remain engaged until the project is completed "he adds.

As for the positions taken by the Moncton-Riverview-Dieppe Conservative candidate, Robert Goguen,
Marco Morency highlights that since the causeway gates were open in April 2010, preliminary results
exceed expectations of all observers and restoration receives the support of four out of five voters in the
region. Petitcodiac Riverkeeper carries out a survey for each federal election since 2000.

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INFORMATION:
Marco Morency | Tel. 388-5337 | Cel. 863-5114 | marco.morency@petitcodiac.org

 

BACKGROUND

The Petitcodiac River causeway was built between 1966 and 1968. Since then, it has altered the river’s
tidal bore, the socio-economic activities that existed along the waterway, and the ecosystem. This
includes negatively affecting aquatic species native to the river, most notably the now endangered inner
Bay of Fundy Atlantic salmon.

The Petitcodiac River causeway was declared illegal in March 2001 by former federal Minister of
Fisheries and Oceans, Herb Dhaliwal, following the tabling of the Niles Report. This triggered a
comprehensive joint federal-provincial environmental impact assessment in 2002, completed in 2005,
which recommended the construction of a partial bridge to completely restore fish passage and comply
with the Federal Fisheries Act. The federal-provincial agreement of 2002 stipulated that the federal and
provincial governments would share the costs of the Petitcodiac River Restoration Project equally.

The Petitcodiac River Restoration Project, valued at approximately $70 million, was initiated in July 2008
and comprises of three phases: preparation (Phase 1, completed in March 2010), the opening of the
causeway gates and monitoring (Phase 2, which will continue until 2012) and the construction of a partial
bridge, which should normally start in spring 2012. You can read the project description at
www.petitcodiac.com for further details.

RESULTS SUMMARY - see attachment

MONCTON, APRIL10, 2011 – One year after the opening of the causeway gates on April 14,
2010, the federal government still has to confirm its intentions in regards to the Petitcodiac River
Restoration Project. In the context of the federal elections, Petitcodiac Riverkeeper sent a
questionnaire to each regional candidate to know their positions.

The Petitcodiac River causeway was declared illegal in March 2001 by former federal Minister
of Fisheries and Oceans, Herb Dhaliwal, following the tabling of the Niles Report. This
triggered a comprehensive joint federal-provincial environmental impact assessment in 2002,
completed in 2006, which recommended the construction of a partial bridge to restore the river’s
ecosystem and allow fish passage to comply with the Federal Fisheries Act. The federalprovincial
agreement of 2002 stipulated that the federal and provincial governments would share
the costs of the Petitcodiac River Restoration Project equally.

“The Petitcodiac River Restoration Project, valued at approximately $70 million in total, was
initiated in July 2008 and comprises of three phases: the last phase, the construction of a partial
bridge, should normally be completed in 2013 or 2014. Our federal representatives’ must
commit to do their share” insists Marco Morency, the Petitcodiac Riverkeeper.

The organisation sent the short questionnaire to all candidates of riding covering the Petitcodiac
watershed. The results will be released publicly in the coming weeks. In the last
elections, almost all applicants argued that the federal government should contribute at least 50%
towards the cost of the restoration project.
Interested in the impacts that shale gas and fracking could have on your community?  A number of groups have expressed an interest in forming a caucus to address this issue.  If your group is interested in participating, please let us know by the end of the day on Tuesday, April 19.

Does your group have resources that you’d like to get out to teachers?  The Sustainability Education Alliance will have a booth at the Anglophone high school teachers’ council day on May 6.  If you have English-language resources appropriate for high school teachers that you would like to display, please let Raissa know before the end of the month.
A number of environmental groups met with the Minister of Energy and his staff recently.  Word on the street is that the Minister is interested in moving toward a diverse array of energy options for the province.  But, he still holds firms in his support for the Point Lepreau refurbishment.  If you are interested in reading Mary Ann’s full report from the meeting, please let us know.

Liz Smith, long-standing delegate to the NB Pesticides Working Group, has submitted a report of the Working Group’s recent meeting.  Of note: the provincial pesticide act is now open for revision.  If you want to read Liz’s full report, please let us know.

Are you wondering how groups across Canada can better harness their collective work on water protection?  Well, the Canada Rivers Network is wondering this, and they’re asking you to fill out a survey to help them help you!
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