• You may have noticed some curious posts about the federal carbon tax on the Government of New Brunswick’s Facebook Page and website.

    Premier Blaine Higgs’ Progressive Conservative government’s materials on the carbon tax and what it will mean for New Brunswick cherry-picks facts about the issue, misconstrues how we got here, and (until recently, after pushback from New Brunswickers and groups like your Conservation Council), didn’t even tell us how to claim the federal Climate Action Incentive in our 2018 taxes (an incentive which, for the majority of New Brunswick households, analysis shows will more than cover the extra costs associated with a carbon tax).

    Between the Higgs government’s misleading information on the carbon tax, and Andrew Scheers robo-texting campaign, there is a lot of politics dominating what should be a serious ‘all-hands-on-deck’ conversation about tackling climate change — what Canada’s leading health professionals call the ‘greatest public health threat of the 21st century.”

    Climate change is already affecting New Brunswickers. An issue this serious and this urgent should go beyond politics. Protecting the places we love should be something we all get behind and give our best, honest effort.

    But, slowing climate change is complicated business. And it’s made all the more confusing by stubborn and disconnected leaders who would rather deny climate change and abandon their duty to slow it and protect us from its effects.

    How did we get here? How does a carbon tax work? Why is it important? What more should we be doing to protect families from increasingly severe flooding, devastating ice storms, and flipped, unpredictable weather?

    Our Dr. Louise Comeau has prepared science-based, non-partisan fact sheets to help answer these important questions. If you are worried about climate change, but not sure where to get a sincere explanation of what all this is about, these resources can help. Give them a read. Share them with friends and family. And please, reach out to us if you have any questions (506-458-8747; info@conservationcouncil.ca).

    For the love of New Brunswick, we can — and must — prepare for a future with less pollution and safer communities.

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  • How do you stop a pipeline when one family owns both the oil and the media?

    By: Lynaya Astephen, member of Red Head Anthony's Cove Preservation Association, read the original here

    Pipeline opponent’s op-ed rejected by Irving-owned newspaper in New Brunswick

    Editors’ note: Saint John’s Telegraph-Journal refused to publish this op-ed, written by a local resident to explain why over 700 people gathered on the shores of the Bay of Fundy this past Saturday to oppose Energy East, TransCanada’s proposed 1.1 million barrel per day pipeline. Like nearly all print media in the province of New Brunswick, the Telegraph-Journal is owned by the Irving family, whose company, Irving Oil, has partnered with TransCanada to build a maritime export terminal for the proposed Energy East pipeline.

    I am a proud resident of Red Head, Saint John, a small rural community with quiet roads and beautiful coastal views.

    TransCanada is proposing a 1.1 million barrel per day pipeline from Alberta to Saint John. After travelling almost the entire length of the country, it would end at a new deep water port on the Bay of Fundy. The Energy East project also includes a massive tank “farm” to store the oil that would be loaded onto waiting ships — across the street from my home.

    Why do I oppose Energy East?

    I’m worried about the air we breathe.

    Saint John is highly industrialized, and residents are already exposed to increased health risks from air pollution, not to mention the oil smells near Irving’s new rail facility. We have, among other industries, Irving Oil’s export terminal and the Canaport LNG terminal. We have 38 times the industrial pollution of Fredericton and 243 times that of Moncton. A recent study found lung cancer rates 30 per cent higher in Saint John than in either of these communities. The health experts I’ve spoken to say that existing regulations for air pollution as inadequate. Yet TransCanada says air pollution from Energy East would not be significant.

    I’m worried about the prospect of a spill or fire at the tank storage farm.

    The deputy fire chief in Burnaby, B.C., has issued a scathing report on the risks presented by a similar oil tank storage facility on the West Coast. The chief warned that a fire at the expanded tank farm could create a “nightmare scenario” resulting in a massive urban evacuation.

    I am having trouble trusting TransCanada and Irving Oil. Despite several requests, TransCanada has refused to hold a public meeting with Red Head residents with an open question-and-answer period.

    A recent Reuters investigation of the New Brunswick Department of Energy found that since 2012, Irving’s export terminal has experienced at least 19 accidents classified as “environmental emergencies.” In 2013, Irving received a formal warning for taking more than a day to report a storage tank leak at the Canaport facility.

    According to National Energy Board statistics, TransCanada has had more pipeline ruptures than any other company in Canada. The company’s electronic monitoring equipment won’t even detect a spill that is less than 1.5 per cent of the pipeline’s capacity. This means over 2 million litres can spill before anyone is alerted.

    My concerns don’t stop at the end of my driveway.

    The Energy East project would see 115 oil tankers in the Bay of Fundy — and potentially far more now that the Cacouna, Quebec, port has been cancelled. The endangered North Atlantic right whales in the Bay of Fundy are already vulnerable to ship strikes and low-frequency ship noise, both of which Energy East threatens to worsen. Moving in and out of port for export, Energy East tankers would carry 1 to 2 million barrels of oil each.

    Energy East would ship diluted bitumen from the tar sands. Sticky and heavy, bitumen from Alberta’s tar sands separated from the diluents (chemicals) and sunk in Michigan’s Kalamazoo River during a pipeline spill in 2010.This cost Enbridge more than $1 billion to clean up, yet submerged oil remains on the river bed to this day.

    One federal study found diluted bitumen sunk and formed “tar balls”in marine conditions similar to the Bay of Fundy. A major spill that occurs during loading of the tankers or when the tankers are leaving wouldn’t just threaten whales. It could be a serious blow for all ocean-dependent economies and jobs.

    A draft federal report accessed through freedom of information admits that not enough is known about the potential toxic effects of tar sands crude in our waterways. Energy East passes through or comes near more than 300 waterways, including at least six of the St. John River’s main tributaries.

    I want to do my part in helping protect future generations.

    The Energy East pipeline would create more climate pollution than any single Atlantic province.

    A recent scientific reportsays 85 per cent of Canada’s tar sands need to stay in the ground if we are to avoid the worst of climate change. Industry wants to double production by 2030 and will pursue both pipeline and rail expansion to export their product. Filling the Energy East pipeline would allow a close to 40 per cent increase in tar sands production.

    We can do better. This export pipeline puts so much at risk for such short-term benefit. There is much more at stake than profit.
  • ClimateLetterWideBanner.sml
    From intense rain, wind and ice storms bringing flooding and power outages, to hotter days and seasons bringing dry summers and ticks, a lot of us are feeling anxious and on edge about climate change in New Brunswick.

    We need strong leadership from our provincial government to do everything it can to protect our families’ health and communities’ safety from the effects of climate change and extreme weather we’re already seeing today.

    This year, make your Earth Day count a little extra by writing Premier Blaine Higgs about your concerns and your call for serious action on climate change.

    We’ve made it easy for you to speak out. Use our letter-writing tool below to let the Premier know where you stand and what you want.Our pre-written letter includes recommendations for smart climate solutions. We strongly encourage you to add to this letter with your own personal story of how climate change makes you feel and how it has affected you and your family.

    Letter button

  • Displaying

    Media Advisory

    CCNB available for comment on new report calling on federal government 
    to phase-out coal powered electricity generation by 2030

    What: Dr. Louise Comeau, the Conservation Council’s Director of Climate Change and Energy Solutions, will be available to respond to questions about a new report, Out with the coal, in with the new: National benefits of an accelerated phase-out of coal-fired power. The report will be released in Ottawa by the Pembina Institute in collaboration with CCNB and other health and environmental groups. The report assesses the potential health and climate change benefits from phasing coal out of electricity production by 2030.

    When: Monday, November 21, 2016, 11 am. Atlantic

    Who: Dr. Louise Comeau Director of Climate Change and Energy Solutions.

    Where: Conservation Council of New Brunswick, 180 St. John St., Fredericton, NB

    Why: Burning coal to generate electricity contributes to air pollution affecting human health, as well as climate change through high levels of greenhouse gases per MWh of electricity produced. There is a global movement away from coal to secure health and climate protection benefits. We are asking the federal Government to announce an accelerated coal phase-out in the lead up to First Ministers meeting in Ottawa December 9, 2016.

    Contacts:Louise Comeau, louise.comeau@conservationcouncil.ca506 238 0355
    Barb MacKinnon, New Brunswick Lung Association, barb.mackinnon@nb.lung.ca506 455 8961
  • MEDIA RELEASE

    SSNB files request for spraying costs
    Fredericton – Feb. 5

    Today, Stop Spraying New Brunswick, Inc. (SSNB) filed an official request seeking to learn how much the taxpayer pays to have forestry companies spray glyphosate-based herbicides on Crown forests.

    It’s important for the public to know how much they are subsidizing big forestry companies,” stated Vern Faulkner, a director with the non-profit advocacy group. The Right to Information and Privacy Protection Act request, better known as a freedom of information request, asks for total costs spent in 2015, 2016 and 2017.
  • Moncton, NB (17 Sept 2014)

    New Brunswickers who are looking for the facts about shale gas are not getting them from the current political debate. They are often being deliberately misled or else are confused by politicians who don’t understand the issues, themselves. And they are definitely missing out on critical information.

    First, the economics.

    The numbers cited by our government appear to be picked from thin air, are baseless and are designed just for the election. Economists don’t see how they can work and the government will supply no supporting data.

    We have all heard David Alward claim that, by drilling a modest 50 wells per year, the province will earn $200 million in annual royalties. He does not say how he arrived at this figure. His math even baffles our province’s top economists.

    In British Columbia, they drilled thousands of wells to earn $200 million in royalties.

    New Brunswick currently has about 50 producing gas and oil wells. The total royalties average roughly $1 million per year. One million is an awfully long way from $200 million. We earn more than a million from our gravel and sand industry.

    New Brunswick’s university economists have analyzed the current royalty scheme. They say these are the lowest royalty rates in North America and that it is highly doubtful that New Brunswickers will gain any significant profits. They say it is an inefficient, overexploitation of our resource. The government has dropped their earlier plan to share royalties with those municipalities and landowners who would be bearing the risk of shale gas.

    The PC party must also further justify their estimates on job creation per well.

    In four years, the only data they quote to support their job claims comes from the partially government-funded and widely disputed Deloitte report, a small and questionable survey that predicted a best-case scenario of 21 jobs per well.

    However, we have examined a number of detailed fiscal policy reports based on actual figures from places where shale gas is being produced. These show an average of 4 jobs per well, while being highly critical of predictive reports like the one from Deloitte.

    In New Brunswick, with our roughly 50 producing wells, we have less than a dozen ongoing full-time jobs.

    Our question is this: Why should we base our decision on estimates from a questionable survey, when there are real life examples and hard facts to draw upon?

    Shale gas is not the only way to bring New Brunswickers home and create jobs.

    Multiple reports actually show that the oil and gas sector produces far fewer jobs than any other energy-related industry. Retrofitting infrastructure for energy efficiency, alternative energy development and mass transit each create up to 8 times the number of jobs created by fossil fuels. These figures are based on real-life experience, not hopes.

    A clean economy requires the same skills that our people out west already have, and it fosters industries that would create career opportunities, retain college graduates, employ both genders, and save the existing jobs in our tourism and agriculture sectors that are now being threatened by shale gas.

    We also ask this: What is the long-term economic viability of this industry?

    The industry is a typical boom-bust venture that leaves communities worse off than they were. Its long-term viability is unproven.

    Recent figures from the Energy Information Agency (EIA), investment firms and financial analysts show that the industry is $100 billion dollars in debt. And 75% of its firms are rated as below investment grade (junk status). As a whole, the industry does not make any money from the sale of gas. It survives on borrowing, and selling assets.

    It also seems some parties do not understand our Oil and Gas Act.

    Hydrofracking is hydrofracking no matter whether you use propane or water, and it is the only way to get shale gas. The idea that one can keep exploring while not allowing hydrofracking is a contradiction in terms.

    And to be clear, if an exploration company lives up to its requirements to invest a certain amount of money, it may automatically convert to production when it is ready. Thus, to put a moratorium on shale gas, you can not allow exploration to continue. You must stop both or you cannot stop either.

    And as various parties talk about the necessity of having world class regulations, they ignore the recent report from the Council of Canadian Academies, which noted that there is so little research or monitoring of shale gas that no regulations anywhere can be said to be based on science. Regulations willnot protect us.

    But, perhaps the largest piece of missing information and discussion concerns the effects of this industry on climate change. The day before our provincial elections there will be massive demonstrations around the world focused on climate change.

    The world’s scientists, militaries, insurers, financial institutions, food and water specialists, and experts in many other fields tell us that climate change is the number one problem facing the world. It costs us billions of dollars and thousands of lives per year already, and those numbers will rise.

    All public policies – local, regional, national and international - must now consider the effects of policy on climate change and the problems that will come from it. Investments in those industries are likely to be lost as the world reduces fossil fuel usage. Yet, remarkably, only one party mentions this ultimate threat and issue in their party platform.

    Our concerns about unconventional oil and gas are not just the immediate threat to our health and environment caused by extraction methods, but also that we will be adding a new source of greenhouse gases to the fossil fuel mix that threatens us and future generations.

    For the past 4 years, volunteers within the Anti-Shale Gas Alliance of New Brunswick have worked hard to get existing science to the people of New Brunswick in an understandable way. We have succeeded in bringing to light the costs and impacts of this industry and making shale gas a hot campaign issue in this election. All of our concerns have been validated by Canadian scientists, and yet, we see the same overinflated numbers and misleading information on economics and jobs being used to gather votes and sell this industry to the public. It is time to eliminate the spin and get honest about this issue.

    The lawsuit that we have filed awaits whichever party wins the election. We are asking that a high standard be used to judge the scientific and health claims of the safety of this industry – “beyond a reasonable doubt” - the same standard for deciding guilt or innocence in court. High stakes demand a high standard.

    So politicians take note. Deciding how to respond to this lawsuit will be one of your first tasks. Please take this seriously for all our sakes and start talking honestly about it now.

    About NBASGA

    The New Brunswick Anti-Shale Gas Alliance represents the interests of New Brunswickers opposed to unconventional gas and oil exploration and development, while promoting a future in clean energy alternatives.

    Website: www.noshalegasnb.ca

    Email: shaleinfo.nb@gmail.com

    Contact Information

    Jim Emberger (English)

    Tel: 506 440-4255       Email: jimemberger@yahoo.com

    Denise Melanson (French)

    Tel: 506-523-9467       Email: inrexton2013@yahoo.ca

  • April 5, 2017

    FREDERICTON – The Conservation Council of New Brunswick’s Executive Director, Lois Corbett, made the following comments in response to the provincial government’s announcement today about new rules and procedures for reporting water quality at Parlee Beach:

    “It’s a smart protocol, one that will increase health protection. Deciding to use Health Canada’s technical and science-based guidelines for beach water safety is the right decision.”

    “Testing the health of the water every day, seven days a week, when the beach is open, will provide our citizens, our local businesses, and our visitors with clear information — Minister Rousselle gave us exactly what we needed. ”

    “And now that the testing, reporting and public communications issues have been resolved, we can next move more quickly to stop the pollution that contaminates the water.”

    “That step is very important and will require both stopping harmful practices like filling in wetlands and salt marshes, and reducing human and animal waste — the main source of the health threats to swimmers. We need to attack all sources — whether it is business or farm runoff, the local sewage system, or private septic tanks and recreational boaters.”

    “Reducing the sources of water pollution is something we all care about but, as individuals, and we sometimes feel we have little to contribute. Well, not this time. It’s all hands on deck to fix the problem and continue to make this beach, and others, a destination of choice.”

    -30-
    • You can read the government announcement here.
    • You can learn more about the new rules here.
    • You can read more about Parlee Beach here.
  • EcoHero Awards 2019 3 680x400
    The Milton F. Gregg Awards are back and bigger than ever!

    The awards have been presented by the Conservation Council annually since 1981 to deserving individuals and organizations who have contributed to protecting New Brunswick’s environment.

    This year we’ve expanded the Milton F Gregg Awards in celebration of our 50th year of environmental action in New Brunswick. You can now nominate your Eco-Hero in one of 15 categories!

    The main Eco-Hero award is given in memory of Milton F. Gregg, who was a founding member of the Conservation Council and had a particular concern for the health of the Wolastoq (St. John) River. Gregg served as federal cabinet minister, diplomat and Chancellor of the University of New Brunswick.

    Please submit nominations by July 31. Our selection committee will notify you and the nominee by September 1. Our awards ceremony will be held at the Beaverbrook Art Gallery in Fredericton on October 12th, 2019 from 7 – 9 p.m.

    Click here to see our full list of catagories and submit your nomination Milton F Gregg Awards.

  • Do you know an individual or organization that has demonstrated excellence in land conservation in our province? Nominations for the 2018 Lieutenant-Governor’s Award for Excellence in Land Conservation are open until Monday, October 1, 2018.

    Successful nominees will have a significant impact on land conservation in New Brunswick through leadership, direct action, and long-term involvement as well as other significant contributions. Eligible nominees may include any individuals or organizations involved in stewardship, volunteerism, donation of lands, or building effective partnerships and must meet at least one of the following criteria:
    • An individual or entity who has contributed in a sustained manner over a significant period of time;
    • An individual or entity who has contributed significantly in a relatively short amount of time;
    • A donor of funds or property;
    • A volunteer, steward and/or member of the Nature Trust of New Brunswick;
    • A corporate or community partner of the Nature Trust of New Brunswick;
    • An individual who contributed significantly in the past and should be recognized posthumously.

    Click here to download the nomination form!

     

    For more information, visit: www.naturetrust.nb.ca/wp/blog/2018-lg-award-nominations or contact Danielle Andrus, Communications Manager, at danielle.andrus@ntnb.org or (506) 457-2398.

    2018 LG
     
  • The UNESCO-designated Fundy Biosphere Reserve (FBR) has released the long awaited results of research into climate change-resilient tree species in southern New Brunswick.

    The FBR recently completed an analysis of which native tree species has the most chance to prosper under changing climatic conditions over the next 100 years, as well as those that will most probably merely persevere, and which could even decline. Northern trees species like spruces, fir, birches, and poplars will likely face more insects, disease, extreme weather, and competition, which would lead to slower growth and higher mortality. By contrast, southern species such as maples, oak, pines, beech, hemlock, and cherry should have a longer growing season and thus, faster growth. 

    The FBR has created a pamphlet that describes the eight ‘winners’ for the changing climate.  It describes the trees and their preferred growing conditions, so that woodlot owners, foresters, municipalities, and the general public are armed with the right information about what to plant and where

    As the climate changes and less-resilient species begin to decline and disappear, the Acadian Forest composition in southern New Brunswick (as well as throughout the Maritimes) will also change. This means that the forest as we know it today will later contain fewer of those northern species, and probably more of these “winners”. But the forest will need help from residents of the region, notably in planting these resilient species.

    By planning ahead for climate change and planting tree species that have a better chance to thrive, we can help ensure that there will be healthy and beautiful trees in our neighborhoods and parks as well as in the forest, to be enjoyed by generations to come. An informative brochure has thus been developed to help 

    The other component of this research is related to forest corridors. As climate change and deforestation affect the forest, wildlife can become cut-off.  The FBR is working with other organizations to try and establish forest corridors based on areas with climate change resilient trees, helping plants and animals move freely around the FBR or to and from Nova Scotia.

    More information on this project, including a detailed research report and maps showing current and projected forest composition within the Fundy Biosphere Reserve, is available at http://www.fundy-biosphere.ca/en/home/forests-of-the-future.html.
     
     
  • News Release

    Council of Canadians (CoC), Fredericton Chapter

    Fredericton, NB                                                                                   September 15, 2014

    Public health axed—Alward giving New Brunswickers a false sense of security

    The three New Brunswick chapters of the Council of Canadians—Fredericton, Moncton, and Saint-John—are accusing Premier Alward of luring New Brunswickers into a false sense of security. In last Tuesday night’s televised debate with the other party leaders, Mr. Alward said that his government had taken the opportunity to develop “the strongest regulations in North America” to oversee shale gas development.

    “We agree with Premier Alward’s statement on the need for tough regulations to protect public health from this industry. But what we are gravely concerned about is what he isn’t saying. Neither he nor anyone in his government have publicly explained why public health was removed from the 12 guiding principles used to develop those regulations,” argues Jean Louis Deveau, a social scientist, who recently completed an analysis of how these regulations were developed. “Using a recipe for developing shale gas regulations without public health as the key ingredient is like cooking a turkey dinner without the turkey,” adds Deveau.

    In December 2011, 12 principles used to develop the regulations appeared in a government press release. They included a mix of things like “taking steps to prevent potential contaminants from escaping the well bore,” “addressing the need for sustainable water use,” and “protecting public health.”

    Six months later, in May 2012, when a discussion paper containing the 116 recommendations for New Brunswick’s world-class regulations was released for public input, public health had been dropped from the mix. There was no mention of this to the public.

    “The failure of this government to include public health as an essential ingredient in the development of these regulations is another indication of this government’s total orientation to meeting the needs of industry as opposed to the wellbeing of the citizens of this province,” adds Caroline Lubbe-D’Arcy, co-chair of the Fredericton Chapter of the Council of Canadians.

    -30-

    Media contacts: Jean Louis Deveau, (506) 459-2907 (h), (506) 238-5277 (c); Caroline Lubbe D’Arcy, (506) 454-5119; Angela Giles, (902) 422-7811
  • October 15, 2015



    PRESS RELEASE



    TransCanada blocking local residents from attending their Energy East Pipeline Community Liaison Committee meeting



    SAINT JOHN – This week, nine local residents and landowners requested to sit in as observers at TransCanada’s Energy East Pipeline Community Liaison Committee meeting held at the Hampton Inn, Saint John, on Wednesday, October 14.  Blocking their entrance, a security guard informed them that only members of the Committee were permitted at the meeting.



    Residents then asked to speak with a TransCanada representative. A short discussion took place with Pamela McKay, Trans Canada’s community consultant, which was videotaped. Ms. McKay informed the residents that TransCanada did not have a policy to allow observers at their Energy East community liaison meetings and that the residents would not be permitted to enter the meeting room.



    https://youtu.be/a4hdSWxq1Pw

    TransCanada blocking local residents from Community Liaison Committee in Saint John, Oct 14, 2015 (12:26)



    “Unlike other local industrial committees, TransCanada denies entry to local citizens,“ said Saint John resident David Thompson who was part of the group kept out of the meeting.  Mr Thompson has a long history of participating in industrial liaison meetings, and presently sits on two other industrial community liaison committees in Saint John.  “We simply wanted to sit quietly and listen to tonight’s committee meeting.”



    “Open, transparent, and democratic public participation should be the operating principles of each and every community liaison committee,” added Thompson. “The National Energy Board should be required to practice this.”



     “It’s a straw horse; it’s dishonest that TransCanada will go to National Energy Board and use this Community Liaison Committee as fulfilling part of their community outreach and consultation,” remarked Colin Seeley after being refused entry.  “As a person with a proposed pipeline running across my property, I have not been contacted since it was announced that the project was being delayed for 2 years.  Meanwhile, TransCanada has been pushing ahead with work on the project such as the recent borehole testing in Red Head.”



    Leslie Hillman, Red Head resident and member of Red Head Anthony’s Cove Preservation Association (RHACPA), was also disappointed to be refused entry, “TransCanada should respect the interests, the health, and the well-being of the residents and make the meeting open to the citizen observers.”



    Teresa Debly, a Red Head resident whose family property has already been impacted by industrial development in the area, says, “Several residents who have considerable experience with other industrial community committees, including myself, have repeatedly requested to be accepted as Committee members, but have been denied each time by TransCanada.  Back in February, I was utterly shocked when TransCanada hired a retired police officer to prevent landowners from attending these meetings.  We are calling upon TransCanada to immediately open up their Community Liaison Committee meeting.”



    A copy of this News Release and the web link to the video is also being sent to the National Energy Board. 



    Media contacts: David Thompson, Saint John, 506-635-1297 and Leanne Sutton, Red Head Anthony’s Cove Preservation Association, 506-654-7857
  • Communiqué de presse

    Conseil des Canadiens (CdC), section de Fredericton

    Fredericton, N.-B.                                                                               Le 15 septembre 2014

    La santé du public retranchée - Alward donne aux Néo-Brunswickois l’illusion de sécurité

    Les trois sections du Nouveau-Brunswick du Conseil des Canadiens, celle de Fredericton, de Moncton et de Saint John, accusent le premier ministre Alward de créer une illusion de sécurité chez les Néo-Brunswickois. Lors du débat télévisé avec les chefs des autres partis, mardi soir passé, M. Alward a dit que son gouvernement avait saisi l’occasion de mettre en place « les règles les plus sévères en Amérique du Nord » pour surveiller l’exploration du gaz de schiste.

    « Nous sommes d’accord avec le premier ministre quand il déclare que nous avons besoin de règles sévères pour protéger la santé de la population contre cette industrie. Mais ce qui nous préoccupe sérieusement, c’est ce qu’il ne dit pas. Ni lui ni personne d’autre dans son gouvernement n’a expliqué publiquement pourquoi la question de la santé du public avait été enlevée des 12 principes sur lesquels se sont appuyées ces règles », de commenter Jean Louis Deveau qui a récemment fait une analyse de la manière dont ces règles ont été établies. « Élaborer des règles pour l’exploration du gaz de schiste en suivant une recette dont le premier ingrédient n’est pas la santé des gens c’est comme préparer un repas de dinde sans dinde », poursuit-il.

    En décembre 2011, 12 principes directeursqui ont servi pour élaborer ces règles sont apparus dans un communiqué émis par le gouvernement.Ils portaient, entre autres, sur des points tels que «prendre des mesures pour éviter une possible fuite de produits contaminants par le puits », « se pencher sur la question de l'utilisation durable de l'eau » et « protéger la santé du public ».

    Pourtant, six mois plus tard, en mai 2012, lorsqu’un document de travail contenant les 116 recommandations – devant servir à établir des règles parmi les meilleures au monde - fut soumis à l’examen du public, on n’y faisait aucune mention de la santé des gens. Et la population n’en avait pas été informée.

    « Le fait que le gouvernement n’ait pas traité la santé du public comme un ingrédient essentiel dans l’élaboration des règles n’est qu’une indication de plus que ce qui compte pour lui c’est de satisfaire les besoins de l’industrie plutôt que de voir au bien-être des citoyens de cette province », déplore Caroline Lubbe-D’Arcy, co-présidente de la section de Fredericton du Conseil des Canadiens.

    -30-

    Contacts pour les médias : Jean Louis Deveau, (506) 459-2907 (m), (506) 238-5277 (c); Caroline Lubbe D’Arcy, (506) 454-5119; Angela Giles, (902) 422-7811



  • Select Committee engages all New Brunswickers in growing the green economy

    FREDERICTON —
     Establishing a Select Committee on Climate Change is an excellent step toward engaging all New Brunswickers in the important work of growing our economy and protecting our communities from extreme weather and sea level rise.

    The Legislative Assembly voted unanimously in support of a motion to establish the all-party committee on Friday, April 9. The Conservation Council applauds the members of the House and looks forward to participating in this public process.

    “This is an opportunity to let all New Brunswickers get involved in the plan to move us smoothly and successfully toward a low-carbon economy,” says Executive Director Lois Corbett.

    Select committees are a way for government to include all New Brunswickers in the investigation of important subjects. Select committees report to all members of the legislative assembly and typically hold public hearings where citizens, government officials and expert witnesses are invited to appear.

    The motion, introduced by Environment Minister Brian Kenny, states: “The government recognizes that investing in clean technology solutions, especially in areas such as renewable energy, energy efficiency, and cleaner energy production and use, holds great promise for sustainable economic development and long-term job creation.”

    It also recognizes climate change as the single most significant challenge of our generation, stating: “New Brunswick is already experiencing impacts of climate change, including sea level rise, extreme rainfall events, coastal and inland flooding, more coastal erosion, heat waves, some migration of invasive species, and diseases.”

    The motion asks the Select Committee to hold public consultations and gives it the power to meet, hold hearings, and release a report whether the House is sitting or not.

    While commending government for introducing the motion, Corbett urges legislators and committee members to move quickly on this important work. “The committee should focus on putting New Brunswick’s best foot forward as the federal government continues work on the national climate plan,” she says.

    “As Minister Kenny says in his motion, acting on the challenge of climate change won’t just protect us from the impacts communities are already experiencing — it’s the best course of action to create jobs in our province,” Corbett concludes.

    The Select Committee on Climate Change is composed of: Andrew Harvey (Lib), the Member for Carleton-Victoria; Bernard LeBlanc (Lib), the Member for Memramcook-Tantramar; Monique LeBlanc (Lib), the Member for Moncton East, John Ames (Lib), the Member for Charlotte-Campobello; Wilfred Roussel (Lib), the Member for Shippagan-Lamèque-Miscou, Jody Carr (PC), the Member for Oromocto- Lincoln, Brian Keirstead (PC), the Member for Albert; and David Coon (Green), the Member for Fredericton South.

    Read the motion here.
    -30-

    To arrange an interview, contact: Jon MacNeill, Communications. Officer: 458-8747; Cell: 261-1353; Email: jon.macneill@conservationcouncil.ca
  • Plastic Ban 20191 e1553870793508 600x316
    Let’s tell Fredericton City Council it’s time to move beyond plastic bags.

    Waste is an ever-growing issue that far too long has been shrugged off. From New Brunswick’s lack of a household composting program, recyclables that are diverted but not actually being recycled, to the acceptance of excessive packaging or use of single-use plastics such as cutlery, straws or plastic bags, we know we can do better — and the time is now.

    Last year university students launched a petition for a province-wide ban on plastic bags following polling that showed more than 70 per cent of respondents in Fredericton, Moncton and Saint John are in favour of the move. New Brunswick’s Minister of the Environment, Jeff Carr, recently told CBC he’s watching how other jurisdictions are tackling the issue and that he wants to see more conversation on the topic in N.B. before moving forward. The conversation has already started in Moncton, so, Frederictonians, let’s get talking about it!

    Sign our petition to Fredericton City Council today and join us in calling for a ban on single-use plastic bags in Fredericton. An excerpt of the petition is below, followed by the full text and the form where you can add your name electronically.

    Want to help us collect signatures? Download your own print version and ask your friends, family and colleagues to sign, or pick one up at our office, Conserver House (180 St. John Street, Fredericton) or at participating businesses across town.

    CLICK HERE TO SIGN OUR ONLINE PETITION TODAY!

  • We are thrilled to let you know that we are publishing a special edition of our magazine, the NB Naturalist, on Nature, Biodiversity and Climate Change.The magazine is free, and is ready for mailing by the end of November. We would like to make it available across the province, please let us know if you are interested in helping with the distribution in your region. The edition is fully translated. Please fill in the form here: https://goo.gl/forms/IdGVeuUJQOwBqj8o2.

    If you have any questions, please contact us: 506-459-4209

     

    Vol 44 No 3 Nov 2017 P1 3

     

  • SSNB needs your support us as we step forward to let our voices be heard. Join us at the Legislature for the submission of the SSNB petition signatories. Bring your loud voice and all the signs, noisemakers and conviction you can muster.
  • Stop Spraying in New Brunswick (SSNB) is a group focused on stopping the spraying of Glyphosate and other herbicides on public land, which includes forest spraying and NB Power spraying in New Brunswick. This includes raising awareness of the harmful effects of Glyphosate on eco-systems and animals in New Brunswick. ( TWITTER: @StopSprayingNB )

    Stop Spraying Petition DEADLINE EXTENDED:

  • Stop Spraying NB NEWS:

    - Stop Spraying NB has launched a NEW ACTION ITEM for supporters:

    Please set up an appointment with your MLA in your local constituency office on a Constituency Monday and BRING SSNB's brand new pamphlet full of great facts to counter govt spin. Every MLA has a duty to be available to you on Mondays!

    You can download and print the pdf of our pamphlet directly from our website (it prints well in black and white!):

    http://www.stopsprayingnb.ca/?page_id=103

    - SSNB has also started sending out a monthly email newsletter to our email list. here is our debut August Newsletter. Please join our email list if you want to be kept up-to-date. we promise not to fill your inbox.

    Link to our SSNB Newsletter: https://mailchi.mp/b773cbb8c314/welcome-to-ssnbs-first-newsletter?fbclid=IwAR1mNBSZ1ze7MVSJdzeIt_IrVJauKSmllN13EHlZfp5Ua_pEYuQZJsqmkwk

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