• CCNB logo HR
    FREDERICTON —
     Lois Corbett, Executive Director, issued the following statement regarding today’s announcement about climate change legislation. She is available for comment.

    “I’m pleased the province has followed the Conservation Council’s advice, and that of the Auditor General, by enshrining climate change targets in law. It is not clear, however, that climate fund the bill sets up will go far enough to protect the health and safety of New Brunswick families and communities already suffering from extreme ice storms, hurricanes and flooding caused by climate change.

    There are no new incentives, financial or otherwise, to innovate, reduce pollution or change behaviours. By toeing the status quo, the government has missed its goal of helping N.B. transition to a low-carbon economy and create jobs.

    It is an uninspiring follow-up to last December’s climate change action plan, which was a smart road map for climate action and job creation that was among the best in the country. And I sorely doubt it will meet the bar set by the federal government.

    Instead, we have legislation that largely maintains the status quo and sets us on a race to the bottom when it comes to protecting the health and safety of New Brunswickers and taking advantage of the economic opportunities that come with ambitious climate action.

    There are some good things in the bill: it requires the Minister to report on how the money in the Climate Change Fund is spent every year; it requires the government to report annually on the progress of its Climate Change Action Plan; and it enshrines in law the government’s carbon pollution reduction targets.”

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    Recommended Links: To arrange an interview, contact:Jon MacNeill, Communications Director, 238-3539 (m) | 458-8747 (w) | jon.macneill@conservationcouncil.ca
  • CCNB

    Media Advisory

    Leading Canadian environmental organizations to outline expectations for Friday’s first ministers meeting on clean growth and climate change

    December 7, 2016 (Ottawa, ON) — Erin Flanagan (Pembina Institute), Steven Guilbeault (Équiterre), Catherine Abreu (CAN-Rac), Dale Marshall (Environmental Defence) and Dr. Louise Comeau (CCNB) will host an online media briefing to outline expectations for Friday’s first ministers' meeting on climate change and will respond to questions.

    Event: Media briefing and Q&A
    Date: Wednesday, December 7th 2016
    Time: 1:00 – 2:00 p.m. (EST)
    Location: via GoToMeeting webinar
    RSVP at: Media Briefing Q&A registration

    Context: For the first time ever, Canadian political leaders are negotiating a pan-Canadian climate plan to meet or exceed the country’s 2030 emissions reduction target. This webinar will outline trends in Canada’s greenhouse gas emissions in light of recent announcements and will discuss the extent to which governments have made policy commitments commensurate with reducing national emissions by 30% below 2005 levels by 2030.

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    Media inquiries:

    Erin Flanagan (English / français)
    Program Director, Federal Policy, Pembina Institute
    587-581-1701

    Kelly O’Connor
    Communications Lead, Pembina Institute
    416-220-8804

    Louise Comeau
    Director of Climate Change and Energy Solutions, CCNB
    506-238-0355
  • NB 2026 Initiative on Learning

    Presentation by Roberta Clowater and Janet Thomas

                On the 26th of October, the Steering committee of the Sustainability Education Alliance responded to an invitation by the NB2026 Initiative on Learning and met at the Conservation Council’s Conserver House in Fredericton. First off, Roberta Clowater explained the project background and purpose. This project is sponsored by NB2026, a citizen group that was established about three years ago under the Graham government. NB2026 is a non partisan group, involving politicians from all camps, citizen leaders, big and small business, academics, social workers and environmentalists from the four corners of the province. The long term aim of the project is to make a cultural shift whereby lifelong learning becomes a core value of all New Brunswickers.

                With only 12% of New Brunswickers being able to read at an advanced level in a society more and more concentrated around a knowledge economy, it is understandable why Premier Alward endorses the idea that our province has to prepare for a cultural shift. We need a long-term plan on where we want to be in 2026 and lay out a road map. This ambitious project will come up with a plan to address New Brunswick’s challenges: literacy, a qualified workforce, citizens with an opinion and children that can envision an interesting life in their community. We need to become a learning province in order to embrace the future.

                The NB 2026 Initiative on Learning is modelled on the poverty reduction process that Janet Thomas helped to implement while working in the social development sector. She explained that this first Outreach phase is designed to inform citizen groups about the project and to invite their participation. More than 3,500 people received an Outreach presentation over the past 6 months. The Public Dialogue phase, starting in November, will invite individuals to province-wide public dialogues. 22 public dialogues will be held in 17 communities beginning in early January, 2012. In the third phase, a carefully selected team of citizens from around the province will then debate the input provided by New Brunswickers to create options for an action plan. Around a year from now, in the final phase, this draft action plan will be presented to a group of leaders from all sectors of New Brunswick society. This group will decide which actions will be included in the final plan, as well as who will undertake each action item.

    This is not a typical consultation process whereby a plan is developed and presented to Government for their action. Instead, like the poverty reduction plan, since developing a learning culture is the responsibility of every New Brunswicker, all sectors of our society will be expected to come to the table prepared to commit themselves to action. Government will be just one of the sectors represented around the table. This will be a wonderful opportunity to work collaboratively amongst the sectors.

                Lifelong learning is crucial for new Brunswickers, because it affects all areas of our lives. Besides job quality and economic security, at stake are our health, quality of life, cultural identity, our openness to diversity, our ability to engage in the political process and our environmental literacy. The Sustainability Education Alliance of New Brunswick understands that this is an opportunity to collaborate in order to assure that the green agenda will find a central place in New Brunswick’s learning agenda.

 © 2018 NBEN / RENB