• La version française suit la version anglaise.


    Funding appeal by the Plants, Swimmers, Flyers, Crawlers, and Four-legged creatures of Mount Carleton Provincial Park

    We are the plants, swimmers, flyers, crawlers, and four-legged creatures of the park, whose ancestors have lived in this part of Wolastokuk (Maliseet homeland) for thousands of years.  Our wish for now is to have a New Brunswick court of law designate this part of Wolastokuk—our homeland—as our sanctuary.

    Members of our extended families, the Kci-Putuwosultihtit Wolastoqiyik (Maliseet Grand Council), will bring our case before the court later this month. The Wolastoqewiyik (Maliseet people) have been, and always will be, our protectors. The Grand Chief of the Kci-Putuwosultihtit Wolastoqiyik, Ron Tremblay, will be joined by Jean Louis Deveau, a co-founder of the Friends of Mount Carleton and former manager of the park, who will intervene on our behalf. Our lawyer is Gordon Allen from Dartmouth, Nova Scotia. 

    The struggle to preserve our home for All Our Relations by challenging in court the decision to turn our home into a snowmobile hub will take thousands of dollars of the plastic money used by two-legged creatures. The economy of the land, air, and water where we live, however, is based not on plastic money, but on sunlight. So, we don’t have plastic money used by two-leggeds and will need the help of friends like you to win this court challenge.

    So, this a special appeal to those of you compassionate two-legged creatures, who understand that we are all interconnected in the circle of life and who are sympathetic to preserving our way of life, here and/or elsewhere in Wolastokuk homeland, to donate your kind of money to help pay for our legal fees in court.

    Please make your donations, large or small, online via our Go Fund Me page or offline to the Maliseet Grand Council, c/o Alma Brooks, 50 Maliseet Drive, Fredericton, New Brunswick, E3A 2V9. 

    • • •

    Demande de fonds par les plantes, les créatures aquatiques, ailées, rampantes, et les créatures à quatre pattes du Parc provincial Mont-Carleton

    Nous sommes les plantes, les créatures aquatiques, ailées, rampantes ainsi que les créatures à quatre pattes vivant dans ce parc et dont les ancêtres ont vécu dans cette partie du territoire Wolastokuk (malécite) pendant des milliers d’années. Ce que nous voulons, aujourd’hui, c’est qu’un tribunal du Nouveau-Brunswick désigne cette partie de Wolastokuk – notre territoire - comme notre sanctuaire. 


    Des membres de nos familles élargies, le Kci-Putuwosultihtit Wolastoqiyik (Grand Conseil malécite),  soumettront notre cause au tribunal plus tard ce mois-ci. De tout temps, les Wolastoqewiyik (le peuple malécite) ont été nos protecteurs et ils le seront toujours. Le grand chef du Kci-Putuwosultihtit Wolastoqiyik, Ron Tremblay, accompagné de Jean Louis Deveau, un co-fondateur des Amis du mont Carleton et ancien directeur du parc, interviendra en notre nom. Notre avocat est Gordon Allen de Dartmouth en Nouvelle-Écosse. 


    Notre lutte pour préserver notre territoire pour toutes nos relations en contestant en cour la décision de transformer nos terres en un centre d’entretien centralisé pour motoneiges va coûter des milliers de dollars de la monnaie qu’utilisent les humains. L’économie de la terre, de l’air et de l’eau où nous habitons ne reposant pas sur le système monétaire des humains mais plutôt sur la lumière du soleil, nous ne disposons pas d’argent. 


    C’est pourquoi nous avons besoin de l’aide d’amis comme vous pour gagner cette bataille juridique. Nous vous lançons donc un appel à vous, créatures à deux pattes compatissantes, qui comprenez que nous sommes tous étroitement reliés dans le cercle de la vie et qui êtes favorables à la préservation de notre mode de vie ici ou ailleurs sur le territoire Wolastokuk, pour que vous nous aidiez, par vos dons, à défrayer nos frais juridiques.  


    Vos dons, peu importe le montant, peuvent être faits en ligne sur notre page Go Fund Me ou envoyés par la poste à Grand Conseil Malécite, a/s Alma Brooks, 50, promenade Maliseet, Fredericton, Nouveau-Brunswick, E3A 2V9.


  • Province-wide
  • Saint John
  • Woodstock

  • July 24, 2017

    Fredericton – In its latest annual report on the state of protected areas in Canada, the Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society (CPAWS) is calling upon New Brunswick to step up efforts to protect more land by 2020. CPAWS’ 2017 report “From Laggard to Leader? Canada's renewed focus on protecting nature could deliver results”calls Canada out for ranking last among G7 countries in the percentage of land and freshwater protected for conservation purposes, and encourages governments to conserve Canada’s natural heritage, starting by delivering on their international commitment. New Brunswick ranks 2nd to last among the Canadian provinces and territories.

    With only 10.6% of its landscape currently protected, Canada lags behind the global average of 15%, and also trails other large countries such as China, Brazil, and Australia. In 2010, as part of a worldwide effort to stem the tide of biodiversity loss, Canada committed under the United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity to protecting at least 17% of land and inland waters by 2020 and improving the quality of their protected area systems to more effectively conserve nature.

    The report recognizes that Canadian governments are finally starting to take this commitment seriously after years of inaction. In February 2017, federal, provincial and territorial Ministers responsible for parks and protected areas publicly announced their commitment to work together to achieve this target. A new Pathway to 2020 process was initiated, and the Indigenous Circle of Experts and National Advisory Panel appointed to advise Ministers on this work.

    “In New Brunswick, there has been no progress on working towards the national protected areas targets,” says Roberta Clowater, Executive Director of CPAWS New Brunswick. “There are steps that can be taken by the province immediately to help Canada reach our goals, including setting a target to increase protected areas, developing an action plan to 2020 and beyond, and protecting the Restigouche Wilderness Waterway.”

     “With less than 3 years to fulfill our 2020 commitment, we need to get going now,” adds Hébert-Daly. “In the report we identify places across Canada where a considerable amount of work has already been done on proposed protected areas. By acting now to permanently protect these sites, while also planning for what’s needed to conserve nature in the long term, Canada has a chance to move from laggard to leader.”

    Clowater adds, “The New Brunswick government could create a world-class wilderness tourism destination by establishing the Restigouche Wilderness Waterway – a wide protected corridor along the river, on Crown land. Currently, 97% of the New Brunswick portion of the Restigouche watershed is open to development, and industrial development is eating away at the region’s wild forests and rivers year by year. By conserving this area’s special nature, promising ecotourism businesses could reliably promote a quality wilderness destination to nature-seeking tourists around the world.”

    Protected areas are important to conserve wildlife and wilderness, as well as provide clean air and water for all Canadians, store carbon, and play a major role in improving our health and well-being. They also make economic sense. Protected areas around the world generate US$600 billion per year in direct spending, while costing less than US$10 billion per year to manage.

    For over 50 years, CPAWS has been working with all levels of government, and other partners across the country to protect more of Canada’s public lands. As the only nationwide charity dedicated to the protection of our public lands and water, we are uniquely positioned to help governments protect what nature really needs.

    -30-

    Read the full report. http://cpaws.org/uploads/CPAWS-Parks-Report-2017.pdf

    Read the Executive Summary with recommendations. http://cpaws.org/uploads/CPAWS-Parks-Report-Executive-Summary-2017.pdf

    For interviews, contact: Roberta Clowater, rclowater@cpaws.org; 506-452-9902NB Needs to Act Protect Restigouche Wilderness Waterway2
  • Charlotte County
  • Opponents push alternative to Mt. Carleton gas bar and snowmobile trail on mountain


    Fredericton -A perfectly good alternative to developments being proposed for within Mt. Carleton Park exists outside the wilderness park, say people dead-set against an enlarged snowmobile circuit and gas bar being promoted by the Province.

    Jean Louis Deveau is spokesman for a group of citizens concerned about the expanding presence of snow machines in the Park and their impact on wildlife. The group is advancing alternative locations to keep the park free of new infrastructure and what they view as incompatible use by motorized vehicles in New Brunswick’s only designated wilderness park. 

    Governor's Lodge at Popple Depot, located east of the park, is one such alternative and is at the centre of a proposed snowmobile ‘hub.’ “From my understanding, Governor’s Lodge has the space for sled gatherings and it also sells gas,” Deveau, a former manager at Mt. Carleton said Tuesday.

    “Why build new infrastructure to enable sleds to gas up in a wilderness park when there are already private establishments in the area offering the services they want?” Deveau asks. Taxpayers would pay for the gas dispensary being proposed for the park, whereas the gas dispensary at Popple Depot was paid for by the private sector.

    “By putting a new gas bar in the park, the Province may well disadvantage or even handicap Governor’s Lodge and other privately owned gas distributors in the area. Won’t that defeat the Province’s goals of trying to create new jobs with this project?” Deveau said.

    Park advocates including Deveau have launched a legal challenge to force the government to abandon the scheme to infringe on the Park, and to follow its own legislation. A crowdfunding campaign on gofundme.com was launched in June to help cover legal fees. The court is scheduled to hear the case on September 2nd in Woodstock.

    The Parks Act (2014) stipulates a management plan based on a zoning system must be completed prior to any development in Provincial Parks. Mt. Carleton has been zoned but doesn’t have a management plan.


  • Plants and Animals Take New Brunswick Government To Court

    Fredericton - When push comes to shove, as it has in the case of pending developments in New Brunswick’s only wilderness park, it’s always good to have allies with deep pockets.

    Such allies are being courted by concerned citizens who are taking the Province of New Brunswick to court over its management of Mount Carleton Wilderness Park near Nictau, N.B. 

    The proposal entails extending a network of snowmobile trails to the summit, park electrification and a gas bar, things the group opposing the project believes will damage the natural area and its wildlife.

    “We’ve turned to Go Fund Me, a crowd-source fundraising website, to gather the $15,000 needed to stop this development in court,” said Jean Louis Deveau, former park manager at Mount Carleton. 

    “The plants and animals cannot speak for themselves,” Deveau said. “With everything around the Park being clear cut, we cannot stand by and let this sanctuary be destroyed. We've raised over $13,000 in the past week so this clearly resonates with people.” 

    Grand Chief Ron Tremblay of the Traditional Maliseet Government has reached out to media outlets to cover this story. In an interview on CBC radio this week he argued strenuously that snowmobiles should not be allowed to expand their range in the park.

    “The commodification of this wild place through snowmobile tourism is not only incompatible with our values, tradition, and culture but will inevitably lead to conflicts between those who, like the Gallant Government, see the park as a place of business and those who, like us, see it as sacred,” said Tremblay. 

    A provincial court justice will hear arguments at the end of June in Moncton. Donors are urged to go to GoFundMe.com and search for ‘Plants & Animals Take on NB Gov’t’ to contribute towards the group's court expenses.




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