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  • Come see why this property is so important.

    http://forestsinternational.org/projects/conservation-of-working-lands/

     

    Since early 2009, CFI has been working with organic farmers and sustainable woodlot owners Clark Philips and Susan Tyler, as well as the New Brunswick Community Land Trust (NBCLT), in order to develop a succession plan for a unique 650 acre farm and Acadian Forest woodlot called Whaelghinbran Farm. Clark (74) and Susan (72), have been farming organically and practicing ecological forestry on their woodlot for over 40 years. By carefully harvesting and marketing timber they have begun a process of restoration, working to achieve the health and diversity found within the Acadian Forest Eco-region prior to European settlement. In order to continue this legacy, Clark, Susan, CFI and the NBCLT are working to uphold the principles and techniques employed at Whaelghinbran Farm through a working lands conservation agreement. CFI intends to steward the farm and woodlot under the conservation easement with a community of interested organizations and individuals, and is striving to establish a rural training centre on site.This training centre will provide students from the region with the knowledge, skills, and network necessary to become involved in a movement rooted in ecologically-based working lands in the Acadian Forest Eco-region. The multi-stakeholder community-based ecological forestry practiced at Whaelghinbran will also provide a strong example of alternative approaches to woodland management in the region.

  • The following letter was sent to the Minister today....

    Hon. Denis Landry 
    Minister of Natural Resources


    As a resident of the Province of New Brunswick, I am deeply concerned that the spraying of our forests is a very dangerous practice that is irresponsible, reckless and potentially affecting the health of its residents. 


    As the President of the Moncton Fish & Game Association, I am also concerned that spraying is also killing our wildlife. Animals in the forest and fish in our waterways are allegedly suffering the negative effects of the spraying of our woodlands. We know that the practice is legal and permissible in our province however we need to ask ourselves should it continue? Should companies be allowed to spray to prevent hardwood growth? Should they be allowed to spray to prevent the spread of berries and other nutrients that wildlife eat? 


    As a province that relies very heavily on its natural resources, (which by the way include generations of hunters and fishermen all of which bring in tens of millions to our NB economy), we all should be deeply concerned. There is a fine line that we have to respect when dealing with Mother Nature. She is not very forgiving at times and it may take many many years to correct the wrongs of previous generations. While current forestry practices permit vast clear cuts and the related spraying of these chemicals, all of these activities must be analysed. 


    Potentially, a moratorium on spraying could be put into place until more scientific information is available. We know that this government is not opposed to moratoriums as is evident by the current one on fracking. Rather than point fingers at companies which will garner the whole cause no credibility at all, we as residents and people who enjoy the outdoors, people concerned for our own health and the health of our children, we all need to band together and question the government in a relentless, credible yet organized public campaign to end this practice once and for all. 


    Forestry activities will continue and as a manageable resource they rightfully should continue; however, neighbouring Provinces of Nova Scotia and Quebec are doing very well with their forestry practices, both enjoying great revenues which belong to the taxpayers and they are NOT spraying. If they can do it then why are we not able to continue forestry operations without spraying and potentially harming people, wildlife and fish? 


    The Moncton Fish & Game Association has taken an official stance that we do not support the spraying of our woodlands. 


    Thank you and I look forward to a response.


    Robert Snider, 

    President

    Moncton Fish & Game Association
  • NB Forests: Have a look!

    Concerned about the level of clearcutting across the New Brunswick landscape?  Frank Johnston has assembled links to satellite photos that tell the tragic tale of NB forests. Keith Wilson has taken a video of clearcutting along the Cains River. Both are eye-opening!

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    Please find a set of Google Map links of selected areas of New Brunswicks deforested landscape below. Clicking on the link leads to the Google map satellite view. If you have Google Earth or the Google Earth Plugin installed the Earth view is accessible from the Google Map page. The full frame view is accessed by clicking the delta next to the Print and Link icons. Clicking the Link icon gives the email send to share if any of these images are of interest.

    http://www.google.com/earth/index.html

    http://www.google.com/earth/download/ge/

    Forest Cover Acadian Region

    Forest Cover North East Region

    Forest Cover Claire Region

    Forest Cover North West Region

    Forest Cover Acadian Region, Paquetville

    Forest Cover Kouchibouguac National Park

    Forest Cover Camerons Mill Saint-Louis de Kent Region

    Forest Cover Campbellton Dalhousie Region 

    Forest Cover Riley Brook Region  

    Forest Cover Fundy Region 

    Forest Cover Woodstock Region 

    Google Maps NB Overview

    Google Maps Plaster Rock and Bathurst Region

    Google Maps Fundy Park Region

    Forested Landscape, Rush Creek, WI  - This is a landscape where forested slopes are only harvested sustainably and wetlands are protected. Agriculture uses soil conservation practices.

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     Check out Keith Wilson's three videos and some discussion on the Wilson Camps blog.

     

  • .


    This video examines the JD Irving and Government of New Brunswick
    Crown Land Forestry Plan and explains why it must be stopped.


    ‪- produced by the Green Party of New Brunswick‬



  • How far is it from your home to the nearest clearcut? And is that clearcut on the list to be sprayed this year? You can check out the online map and zero in on this piece of information if you want. But, let me warn you, you really don’t want to know. For me, the spray planes will be about 2 km away. And the runoff from the sprayed area will go downhill into the brook that runs right by me and hey, guess what else, water from the brook irrigates my vegetable garden. Hmmm…..yum. Not to mention any aerial drift that makes it my way.

    Blog spray MA aug 2016
    Never mind! The government’s new report on glyphosate didn’t look at New Brunswickers’ health data although they acknowledge that there are outstanding health questions. And, according to our 2014 forest strategy, we don’t seem to be worried about the health of all the other species who used to live in the once-upon-a-time-woods-but-now-a-clearcut.

    One of the more amazing things about this whole scenario is that we pay for the spray with our tax dollars. The Auditor-General, in her 2015 report, criticized the government for losing $53.67 million in the last 5 years on its forest operations due to silviculture costs, including spraying. She didn’t have anything good to say about clearcuts and recommended that we do less, not more. She noted that selective and partial cutting methods are recognized as the best management practices and they also protect water, wildlife habitat and preserve biodiversity.

    What is the connection between clearcuts and spray? Clearcuts are sprayed with herbicides and then they are planted in softwood trees. In NB, the natural forest includes both hardwood and softwood trees. After a cut, both types of trees will grow back on their own from the seeds and seedlings that are in the area naturally. Herbicides kill hardwoods, but not softwoods. Softwoods make better lumber so the goal of spraying is to kill the hardwoods - dead in their tracks.

    And what happens in other places? According to the government’s report, glyphosate use here is different from everywhere else. Worldwide, 90% of glyphosate is used in agriculture. In NB, 61% is used in forestry, 27% industrial (think NB Power and DTI), and 11% is agriculture. The report found that 40% of the forest land cut in NB in 2014 was sprayed with glyphosate. The Canadian average is 11%. And Quebec, which cut almost 3 times more woods than NB, did not spray at all!

    Blog2good MA spray aug 2016
    Imagine what might happen if we stopped paying the forest companies to dump this poison on our heads? Would that improve our province’s financial bottomline? Could those millions of dollars be better spent on health and education? I think so!
     

    More info

    Link to the GeoNB online spraying map (When you get into GeoNB, click the okay button on the bottom right. If you click on the hyperlink, you get a forest company perspective video. Once you are on the map, to see the planned spray areas you will need to zoom in and wait a bit.)

    Link to government report on glyphosate and responses from environmental organizations

    Link to November 2015 Statement from groups calling for a new Crown Lands and Forests Act

    Link to Stop Spraying NB

    Link to Conservation Council of NB
 © 2018 NBEN / RENB