Ben Baldwin will forever be remembered by many Miramichiers and New Brunswickers as the farmer who used his scientific knowledge to take on the polluters of Miramichi. Ben died peacefully at his home in Miramichi on July 7, 2017 at the age of 86.

A founder of the Miramichi Environmental Society and a former board member of the Conservation Council of New Brunswick, Ben was a geologist and an environmentalist when being an environmentalist wasn’t cool nor easy.

Ben Baldwin 2009 321x480Ben Baldwin at the Conservation Council’s Spring Auction in 2009.

An edition of Harrowsmith magazine from 1991 features Ben in its hometown hero series. Ben told the reporter, “Somebody has to speak out. It’s nothing particularly heroic on my part. I care about what’s happening. You get disgusted, and it takes a lot of physical energy. But as long as we live here, we can’t avoid being involved in environmental issues. We breathe the air too; we can’t just sit back and ignore the stink.”

Starting almost immediately upon his return from Western Canada to live a life on his family farm in Miramichi in 1985, Ben soon responded to remedy a local farmer’s concerns of chemicals oozing onto her property from the Domtar Wood Preserving Plant, and then to a long list of other environmental problems plaguing Miramichi.

“Ben was a big guy with a big heart who stood up for what he believed in. I had the good fortune to know Ben as a friend, and my life is the richer for it,” wrote David Coon, who worked with Ben during both their time with the Conservation Council of New Brunswick.

My earliest memory of Ben is of my dad, Donald Glynn, and Ben talking about their vegetables at the Miramichi Agricultural Exhibition on a hot summer day in August. Ben’s vegetables from Spruce Shade Farms almost always took first prize. Whenever dad spoke of Ben, it was always with such respect — an admiration shared by many across the province.

Ben was the partner of Inka Milewski, the Conservation Council’s former science advisor. The Conservation Council family expresses condolences and love to Inka and Ben’s children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren.

Written by Tracy Glynn of The Conservation Council of New Brunswick
Were you informed, inspired, or impressed by environmental reporting in New Brunswick in the past year? If you know of a deserving writer consider nominating them for this 2nd annual award. The deadline for nominations is July 31st, 2017.
 
 
The Beth McLaughlin Environmental Journalism Award
 
By recognizing the best environmental reporting, this award seeks to inspire journalists in all media and to showcase reporting that best addresses important environmental issues in New Brunswick. We invite journalists from traditional news media, independents, and non-profits, citizen journalists and students to submit their finest work.
 

Criteria and eligibility:

Entries must be predominantly about an environmental subject occurring in or affecting New Brunswick, and must have been published, broadcast, or posted during the calendar year preceding the current prize year (ie. in 2016).

Entries which address the following issues are particularly encouraged:

* investigative reporting that uncovers an important environmental issue in New Brunswick or is about an important issue not covered elsewhere
 
* stories alerting readers/listeners/viewers to an important emerging issue in New Brunswick

* stories that help clarify complex environmental issues or events of significance in New Brunswick

stories that uphold the journalistic principle of protecting the public interest

stories that resulted in improvements or positive change in the community

How to Apply:

Nominations may be made by environmental groups, media organizations, teachers, or any other interested parties.  Applicants may be self-nominating.

Submission deadline: July 31st, 2017.

Submit entries to: Conservation Council of New Brunswick, Southeast Chapter Environmental Journalism Award Committee, at ccnbsoutheast@gmail.com

Information to Include:

1. Nominator’s name, email, and phone number.

2. Journalist’s name, email, phone and/or other contact information.

3. Provide links to broadcast and online entries. Print entries can be provided as a pdf or html attachment or via web links where the entry is published or posted and publicly accessible. All links must be to the same version of the entry as originally aired, published or posted, with all the same graphics, headlines, photos, etc. and not modified after the contest year.

4. If the entry is not publicly accessible, permission must be obtained from the publisher for CCNB SE to link to it or repost it for public access.

5. Background information on the piece for the judges may be added, but is not required.

Thanks to generous donors, the award this year is worth $500.00 and two tickets to the CCNB SE Chapter fall event.

Full details at :  http://www.conservationcouncil.ca/13679/

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PRESS RELEASE

Swim Guide launches third version of water quality app

July 6, 2017


(FREDERICTON) -- Getting ready for beach time in New Brunswick? Before you go, download the brand-new version of the Swim Guide app.

With over a million users worldwide, the popular (and free!) application gives beachgoers access to the latest water quality monitoring results for their favourite beaches, along with descriptions, photos, and directions.

New in 2017

The 2017 update means Swim Guide is now available in French, English and Spanish. It includes information for over 7,000 beaches in Canada, the United States, Mexico and New Zealand, and has individual entries for over two dozen New Brunswick beaches.

What’s in it and Why is it Helpful?

Swim Guide lets people browse the map or search for a beach by name.  Each beach has a description that list amenities, informs you about lifeguards, provides tips about where to park and other valuable information.

If you don’t know your way to the beach, don’t worry, the app also provides directions whether you’re walking, cycling, driving, or taking transit.

Using Swim Guide

Every beach in Swim Guide is marked with an icon that easily lets you know if the water quality is safe for swimming.
  • Green means the beach’s most recent test results met relevant water quality standards.
  • Red means the beach’s most recent test results failed to meet water quality standards.
  • Grey means water quality information for the beach is too old (more than 7 days old) to be considered current, or that info is unavailable, or unreliable.
The water quality data for NB destinations comes from the Department of Environment and Local Government’s website, and is uploaded to Swim Guide by the Conservation Council. Each beach has a “Source” section which details how the data was obtained.

Quotes

“Since launching Swim Guide in 2011 our goal has been to make water quality information simple to access and easy to understand, for as many people as possible. In addition to improving the search, design, and data presentation with this latest version of the iOS app, we are incredibly proud to be able to provide this service in multiple languages so that even more beach lovers can easily find all of the information they need to have a great day on the water.” - Mark Mattson, President, Swim Drink Fish Canada 

“The new Swim Guide is timely and evidence-based. We hope NB citizens and visitors love it as much as we do. Its clear information about when and where our beaches are monitored will also help us identify sources of water pollution so that together we can act to protect healthy waters and sustainable communities.” Lois Corbett, Executive Director, Conservation Council of New Brunswick

About Swim Guide

Swim Guide was developed by Swim Drink Fish Canada (previously a project of Lake Ontario Waterkeeper), a non-profit organization based in Toronto, with the goal to ensure that 100 per cent of Canadians have access to basic data about the health of their watersheds. The group just released the first-ever Canada Beach Report, which was created in collaboration with Waterkeepers, Riverkeepers and Baykeepers across Canada, including the Conservation Council.

For more information, see these resources:
Want to check it out for yourself? Download the iOS version for your Apple product or the Android app for your smartphone.

To arrange an interview, contact: Corey Robichaud, Communications Officer, corey.robichaud@conservationcouncil.ca506-458-8747.
The Conservation Council’s Executive Director, Lois Corbett, is calling for caution and transparency after the federal government gave its approval of the proposed open-pit Sisson Mine near Stanley.

Corbett told CBC Radio’s Information Morning Fredericton on Monday, June 26 that many details surrounding the project — such as the specific design of the tailings dam needed to protect the Nashwaak watershed and surrounding communities from toxic mine waste, or who would pay for the costs of replacing drinking water and repairing stream habitat in the event of a leak or breach like we saw at Mt. Polley, B.C. — have yet to be made public.

Northcliff Resources, the company behind the Sisson project, was given 40 conditions to meet during the provincial environmental assessment process last year. Corbett said there was talk at Friday’s announcement that the company had met all the conditions, but “I’ve yet to see any evidence of that. There’s not a spot on the website where you can go and download a detailed tailings dam design, for example.

“Perhaps the company has provided some material, so someone could check a box on a long list of conditions. I haven’t seen any evidence of that, and I would hope the government would let us all see soon, sooner as opposed to later,” she said.

Listen to the full interview with host Terry Seguin here.

For more coverage of CCNB on the Sisson Mine project, check out:

  • Corbett called for greater transparency from the provincial government in this CBC article published Friday, 23, saying “this project is a long way from being complete — a piece of paper from a federal minister saying approval is granted, with no details, doesn’t give me much confidence.”
  • The New Brunswick Telegraph-Journal reported on concerns raised by Corbett and Taymouth Environmental Action’s Jim Emberger about the risks to drinking water, river habitat, and nearby communities.
  • Corbett questioned the logic behind risking drinking water for a limited number of unsustainable jobs in this Canadian Press story, saying “I remain to be convinced that those jobs created over the life of the project are equal in weight to the risk to the water.” The story was shared by Global News, CTV, the Globe & Mail, The Financial Post, Metro News, Nanaimo News, the Red Deer Advocate,105.3 the Fox, 104.9 and K93.
  • Corbett commented on the environmental risks of the project in stories by L’Acadie Nouvelle and L’actualite.
For more information on the Conservation Council’s concerns about the Sisson Mine, see:

(Maugerville, NB) The Nature Trust of New Brunswick has expanded the amount of conserved land in the Grand Lake Meadows region with the acquisition of 70 hectares (172 acres) on Middle Island in the Maugerville area of the lower St. John River. The new nature preserve will be named after the traditional Wolastoqiyik/Wəlastəkwiyik name for the island, Noloqonokek/Nələkwənəkek Nature Preserve. 

Long before the river was named the St. John River, it was known by Wolastoqiyik/Wəlastəkwiyik (Maliseet People) as ‘Wolastoq’/Wəlastəkw, meaning ‘Beautiful and Bountiful river’, a name that the nation is currently working to reclaim. ‘Noloqonokek/Nələkwənəkek’ is the traditional Wolastoqiyik/Wəlastəkwiyik name for what is now known as ‘Middle Island’. Nolomiw refers to upriver and ‘qono’ refers to a ‘long period of time’ therefore, ‘Noloqonokek/Nələkwənəkek’ is relating to upriver and a long period of time. The Maliseet language was an oral language and two linguistic spelling variations of the language have been developed and are both recognized today.

“Wolastoq ancestors wisely named each and every landscape and waterway according to a detailed description of each unique area.” Says Wolastoq Grand Chief, Ron Tremblay. “For instance, Wolastoq means “Beautiful and Bountiful River” for it once was Beautiful as well as provided everything our people needed to survive.”

For many generations, Middle Island has served the farming families of the Maugerville area as summer pasture ground. The Nature Trust acquired the new nature preserve to conserve in perpetuity the floodplain forest and Provincially Significant Wetlands that supports a diversity of plant life, birds, amphibians, and rare insects. The preserve is part of the Grand Lake Meadows, Atlantic Canada’s largest freshwater wetland complex.

“The Nature Trust is excited to work with landowners on protecting new pieces of the Grand Lake Meadows.” Says Nature Trust President, Vince Zelazny. “As the largest wetland in the Maritimes, the Grand Lake Meadows is a hotspot for a diversity of rare and endangered species. This acquisition is important to protecting the habitats that these species rely on for survival.”

On the afternoon of June 24th from 1 – 5 PM, the Nature Trust, along with Wolastoqiyik elders, and Canoe Kayak New Brunswick, will be hosting a grand opening event. Members of the public are invited to join a paddle in the big canoes, starting at Douglas Hazen Park, going past the Welamukotuk Cinerea Nature Preserve on Oromocto Island, with a stop at the shoreline of Noloqonokek. For more information and to join the grand opening event, please contact Bethany at bethany.young@ntnb.org or at (506) 457-2398.

A special thank you to those who contributed to the protection of Noloqonokek/ Nələkwənəkek Nature Preserve including major funders: The Government of Canada through the Natural Areas Conservation Program, the NB Wildlife Trust Fund, the Davis Conservation Foundation, The William P. Wharton Trust, the Sitka Foundation, and the ECHO Foundation.

About the Nature Trust of New Brunswick

Established in 1987, the Nature Trust of New Brunswick is a registered charitable conservation organization dedicated to preserving the province’s ecologically significant landscapes. To date, the Nature Trust has conserved over 2,800 hectares (7,000 acres) in 50 beautiful and diverse nature preserves in New Brunswick.

About the Natural Areas Conservation Program

The Government of Canada’s Natural Areas Conservation Program (NACP) is a unique public-private partnership managed and directed by the Nature Conservancy of Canada (NCC). To date, $345 million has been invested in the NACP by the Government of Canada to secure our natural heritage. Additionally, more than $500 million in matching contributions has been raised by NCC and its partners. 
Tuesday, 20 June, 2017

Conservation Council reacts to Auditor General’s report on climate action in N.B.

The Auditor General of New Brunswick, Kim MacPherson, has delivered a substantive review of the province’s climate change plan and what is needed to turn policy intentions into on-the-ground work to protect homes and communities from what she says “may be one of the greatest challenges for communities, governments and corporations in the coming decades.”

“New Brunswick’s Auditor General’s report should put wind in the sails of the government’s plans to reduce carbon pollution and make our communities healthy and strong in the face of climate change,” says Lois Corbett, Executive Director of the Conservation Council of New Brunswick.

“She points out, and rightly so, that while the 2016 Climate Change Action Plan lays out a series of 118 actions, we lack an aggressive time table or details on implementation.

She recommends that the government introduce legislation to set its pollution targets into law, similar to that found in British Columbia, Quebec, Ontario, and Nova Scotia.

We couldn't agree more and might go even a bit further — let’s see the legislation introduced the next time the Legislative Assembly meets, and let’s hope all parties vote for its speedy adoption.

“If we want to catch this boat, the time for the government and NB Power to move is now. Not in 2018. Not ten years from now," says Corbett.
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The Conservation Council of New Brunswick
Established in 1969, the Conservation Council of New Brunswick has remained the province’s leading public advocate for environmental protection. A member of the UN’s Global 500 Roll of Honour, we work to find practical solutions to help families and citizens, educators, governments and businesses protect the air we breathe, the water we drink, the precious marine ecosystem and the land, including the forest, that support us.

Recommended links

To arrange an interview, contact:
Jon MacNeill, Communications Director | 458-8747 | jon.macneill@conservationcouncil.ca
POUR DIFFUSION IMMÉDIATE                                                                                          Le 15 juin 2017


Le Grand conseil malécite obtient un ajournement


Le Grand conseil malécite a obtenu un ajournement des audiences, cette semaine, en cour, dans sa tentative d’empêcher le gouvernement du Nouveau-Brunswick d’implanter un centre de services pour motoneiges  au parc provincial Mont-Carleton, un lieu sacré pour les Malécites.

«La première chose que notre avocat, Gordon Allen, a faite, ça été de demander un ajournement des audiences prévues pour l’avant-midi pour nous allouer plus de temps pour une audition complète du cas.  On avait aussi besoin d’un ajournement pour apporter des modifications à notre demande initiale», a dit le Grand Chef Ron Tremblay, qui se trouvait au palais de justice de Woodstock mardi de cette semaine.

«Ces modifications vont expliquer comment le centre proposé pour l’entretien de motoneiges va affecter le lien spirituel que notre peuple a avec cet endroit et le rapport avec les promesses qui nous ont été faites dans le Traité de 1725-26», précise Tremblay.

L’avocat de la province s’est opposé à l’ajournement demandé, mais le juge Richard Petrie a accepté la demande après avoir entendu les arguments de Me Allen. Il a aussi fixé des échéances pour certaines tâches dont les deux parties doivent s’acquitter pour s’assurer que l’audience se déroule plus rondement et efficacement.

Dans les 60 prochains jours, les parties devront mettre la touche finale aux modifications et régler certains problèmes quant à la preuve qui sera présentée en cour.  Aussi, une conférence préparatoire à l’audience aura lieu pour fixer une nouvelle date pour l’audition complète et tous les points importants qui s’y rattachent.

Une campagne de sociofinancement pour appuyer la révision judiciaire a permis, jusqu’à maintenant, d’amasser plus de 20 000 $ provenant de 145 donateurs.
POUR DIFFUSION IMMÉDIATE                                                                                                 Le 12 juin 2017

Cour doit poursuivre des audiences dans l’affaire  du parc provincial Mont Carleton cette semaine

Renseignements obtenus de l’APECA déséquilibre les déclarations du gouvernement

Selon la Cour suprême du Canada, le gouvernement doit agir «avec honneur et intégrité, et éviter la moindre apparence de ‘manœuvres malhonnêtes’» dans ses rapports avec les peuples autochtones.

«Pourtant, ce n’est pas comme ça que le gouvernement du Nouveau-Brunswick agit», affirme le Grand Chef Ron Tremblay, un des auteurs de la demande de révision judiciaire dans l’affaire de la décision prise par le gouvernement du Nouveau-Brunswick d’aménager un centre de services pour motoneiges au parc provincial Mont Carleton.

Au moment où ce projet a été annoncé, on y mentionnait des dameuses, un sentier désigné menant au sommet du mont Carleton et deux nouveaux ponts pour motoneiges.

«Les deux nouveaux ponts pour motoneiges sont les pièces maîtresses de ce projet; c’est ce qui fait le lien avec le reste du projet», affirme Jean Louis Deveau, l’autre demandeur de révision judiciaire.

Une demande d’Étude d’impact sur l’environnement (ÉIE) pour ce projet a été déposée en septembre 2016. A l’époque le gouvernement a soutenu que les ponts n’étaient pas considérés comme faisant partie du projet.

Cependant, des renseignements obtenus récemment de l’Agence de promotion économique du Canada atlantique (APÉCA) en vertu de la Loi sur le droit à l’information et la protection des renseignements personnels indiquent que la demande de financement faite à l’APÉCA par la partie requérante incluait des fonds pour construire les deux ponts qui sont au centre de la controverse. Et il est de fait que le financement pour les ponts figure dans le contrat conclu entre les requérants et l’APÉCA.

Le Grand Chef Tremblay conclut qu’ «à la lumière de ces nouveaux renseignements, c’est évident que le gouvernement n’agit pas avec honneur et intégrité».

La cour doit poursuivre les audiences dans cette affaire le 13 juin à Woodstock. Une campagne de financement participatif (https://www.gofundme.com/27ru624) a été entreprise en juin 2016 pour aider à payer les frais juridiques.

La Loi sur les parcs (2014) stipule qu’avant que l’on puisse procéder à tout développement dans un parc provincial, celui-ci doit être doté d’un plan de gestion basé sur un plan de zonage. Or pour le parc Mont Carleton, il existe un plan de zonage mais pas de plan de gestion.

We’re  excited to announce the #MyNatureNB contest in partnership with Canada 150! Celebrate New Brunswick nature and have the chance to win awesome prizes! Grand prize is Whale Watching for two in beautiful, scenic St. Andrews, NB. Top 5 winners will receive outdoor adventure prize packs and weekly winners will receive our Canada 150 seed pods!  Between June 1st and June 30th, 2017, you have the opportunity to share your special place or activity that connects you with nature. Whether it’s exploring your family’s wood lot or walking your dog in Cape Tormentine, we want to hear your story. It’s that easy! Make sure you hashtag #MyNatureNB to be entered!

Visit mynaturenb.ca for full contest details

*****

Nous sommes excités d’annoncer le concours #MaNatureNB en partenariat avec Canada 150! Célébrez la nature du Nouveau-Brunswick et courrez la chance de gagner des prix superbes! Le grand prix est une sortie d’observation de baleines pour deux dans la région magnifique et pittoresque de St Andrews, N.-B. Les premiers 5 gagnants recevront des ensembles de prix pour les aventures en plein air et les gagnants hebdomadaires recevront nos capsules de graines Canada 150! Entre le 1er juin et le 30 juin 2017, vous aurez la chance de partager votre endroit spécial ou l’activité qui vous relie à la nature. Que ce soit explorer le terrain de votre famille ou promener votre chien à Cap Tormentine, nous voulons entendre votre histoire. C’est si simple! Assurez-vous d’utiliser le hashtag #MaNatureNB afin d’être entré au concours!

Visite manaturenb.ca pour les détailes de concours complets.


Media Advisory: Fundy Baykeeper honoured tonight by Atlantic Salmon Federation


Wednesday, May 17, 2017 — Fredericton

Attention news editors: The Fundy Baykeeper, a program of the Conservation Council of New Brunswick, receives the Atlantic Salmon Federation’s top national honour, the T.B. “Happy” Fraser Award, during a gala ceremony at the Algonquin Hotel in St. Andrews tonight. Matt Abbott, the Fundy Baykeeper since 2011, accepts the award.

The Fundy Baykeeper, the flagship program of the Conservation Council’s Marine Conservation Program, was selected for its longstanding commitment to the ecosystems of the Bay of Fundy, where wild Atlantic Salmon are on life support, and its decades-long work to protect New Brunswick’s coastal environments from pollution.

“Our coastlines in New Brunswick are true treasures,” says Abbott. “From the sprawling tides of the Bay of Fundy, to the warm ocean waters at Parlee Beach, our work to protect these spaces is all about consistency, dedication, and the commitment of our team to achieve results over time.”

Matt Abbott is available for media interviews upon request.

To arrange an interview, contact:

Jon MacNeill
Communications Director
506-458-8747 (w) | 506-238-3539 (m)
jon.macneill@conservationcouncil.ca

MEDIA RELEASE

Conservation Council welcomes investments to protect
health of people and ecosystem at Parlee Beach

Fredericton, May 5, 2017 — Today, the provincial government announced infrastructure investments and restrictions on new development specific to the Parlee Beach area. Lois Corbett, Executive Director of the Conservation Council of New Brunswick, issued the following statement.

“Today’s announcement is an important step to protect the health of our treasured Parlee Beach ecosystem and the families who swim and play there.

These investments, coupled with better impact assessment for new developments, including campgrounds, should speed up the repair of this valued beach ecosystem. Better sewage treatment, combined with smart education programs, will reduce harmful bacteria that can pollute our coast and jeopardize human health. Keeping our bays and beaches clean always pays off for our coastal economies.

Pollution from near shore developments on the Northumberland Strait, like campgrounds and roads,  won’t be solved by today’s announcement. The Conservation Council encourages the Minister of Environment to move the coastal zone protection policy from being a paper document to a regulation under the Clean Water Act, and to classify important bay areas to protect their health, like they currently do in Maine. Putting in place a comprehensive land use policy and much wider wetland and salt marsh buffer zones for the entire Northumberland Strait region would further safeguard public and environmental health.

Projects we will monitor closely with respect to Parlee Beach water quality include the cumulative effects assessment and protocols development (which will study the impact of the total pollution going into Shediac Bay, not just pollution from individual projects), and an independent ground survey of local wetlands to improve our understanding of their size and the ecological services these critical spaces provide.”

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Background

In April, the Conservation Council welcomed the provincial government’s decision to use Health Canada’s technical and science-based guidelines for beach water safety at Parlee Beach. The protocol includes daily water quality testing, seven days a week, with all monitoring results and public health advisories posted online for easy public access.

The province announced rules for notifying the public about water quality test results after it was revealed that high levels of fecal contamination in the water at Parlee Beach, including E. coli, went unreported for the past three summers.

Escherichia coli (abbreviated as E. coli) is bacteria found in the environment, foods, and intestines of people and animals. Although most strains of E. coli are harmless, others can make you sick and can cause kidney failure, urinary tract infections, respiratory illness and pneumonia. When we discover E. coli in water, it usually has come from sewage runoffs, and animal faecal matter. That’s why health officials all over the world carefully monitor E. Coli and its different strains.

Health Canada has set safe limits for E. Coli in drinking water and E. coli in recreational waters. The number of faecal bacteria considered unsafe for recreational swimming varies depending on whether the bacteria is found in freshwater or saltwater. If tests find more than an average of 35 for every 100 millilitres (just a wee bit less than 1/2 cup), it is declared unsafe for all and the beach is closed.

To arrange an interview, contact:

Jon MacNeill
Communications Director
Conservation Council of New Brunswick
506-458-8747 | 506-238-3539
jon.macneill@conservationcouncil.ca

April 5, 2017

FREDERICTON – The Conservation Council of New Brunswick’s Executive Director, Lois Corbett, made the following comments in response to the provincial government’s announcement today about new rules and procedures for reporting water quality at Parlee Beach:

“It’s a smart protocol, one that will increase health protection. Deciding to use Health Canada’s technical and science-based guidelines for beach water safety is the right decision.”

“Testing the health of the water every day, seven days a week, when the beach is open, will provide our citizens, our local businesses, and our visitors with clear information — Minister Rousselle gave us exactly what we needed. ”

“And now that the testing, reporting and public communications issues have been resolved, we can next move more quickly to stop the pollution that contaminates the water.”

“That step is very important and will require both stopping harmful practices like filling in wetlands and salt marshes, and reducing human and animal waste — the main source of the health threats to swimmers. We need to attack all sources — whether it is business or farm runoff, the local sewage system, or private septic tanks and recreational boaters.”

“Reducing the sources of water pollution is something we all care about but, as individuals, and we sometimes feel we have little to contribute. Well, not this time. It’s all hands on deck to fix the problem and continue to make this beach, and others, a destination of choice.”

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  • You can read the government announcement here.
  • You can learn more about the new rules here.
  • You can read more about Parlee Beach here.
Falls Brook Centre as you know is a registered charity and demonstration centre, committed to finding and promoting practical solutions to today's sustainability challenges. We are dedicated to the goals of inspiring people to work together using environmentally sound practices to create thriving local communities. What does this look like? Highlighting local economies, renewable energy options, and economically and ecologically sound land management techniques that work on the quarter-acre to 5,000 acre scales. On the ground, this is all about education aimed at all ages and addresses. If this sounds like something you could be a part of, I encourage you to visit our website and social media pages and consider becoming a Board member to make a real difference in the lives of New Brunswickers.

http://fallsbrookcentre.ca/wp/get-involved/volunteer-opportunities/

From what I'm hearing most folks don't know what's been happening regarding a second nuclear reactor for New Brunswick and a large proposed underwater power line under the Bay of Fundy from Saint John to Boston.  Although there's lots of talk about good clean green energy it seems likely the plan is to carry electricity from tidal turbines strung across the head of the Bay of Fundy and possibly a second nuclear reactor in New Brunswick.  There seems to be a lot going on here under the bed covers unknown to most of the public and most in the environmental community.  People need to know what's happening and now.  Could you post the attached items up where they will attract people's attention and people will view them.

Reference: Second Nuclear Reactor Could Happen, Telegraph Journal, January 27, 2017

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PRESS RELEASE

CCNB’s Fundy Baykeeper applauds restart of Energy East Pipeline Review and calls for a reform of the NEB before the review moves forward

The Conservation Council of New Brunswick’s Fundy Baykeeper applauds the National Energy Board’s decision on Friday to restart the Energy East review process.

“This is an important decision, but not an unexpected one,” said Fundy Baykeeper Matt Abbott. “Given the questions of bias hanging over all decisions made by the last National Energy Board panel, the only way to move forward was to void all the past panel members’ decisions.”

The ruling was made following  the filing of a Notice of Motion with the NEB on Jan 10 by Ecojustice lawyers representing Transition Initiative Kenora (TIK) calling for the Energy East proceedings to be declared void as a consequence of reasonable apprehension of bias.  Read the Motion here.

The project’s 2016 hearings were suspended late last August, after complaints were filed against two NEB board members – Jacques Gauthier and Lyne Mercier– who met privately with former Quebec premier Jean Charest while he was being paid as a consultant to TransCanada Corp. The review panel recused itself shortly afterwards, prompting demands that the review process be restarted.

All decisions made by the previous panel members are void and will be removed from the official hearing record. Those who’ve already applied to participate need not reapply, but essentially everything re-starts.

Abbott says that this decision won’t fix the NEB process regarding Energy East. The current process was put in place by the Harper Government and has been roundly criticized by many.

“The Energy East review should be delayed until a modernized review process is in place. Given the problems with NEB that the Energy East review has brought into focus, it is clear that we cannot have confidence in the NEB as it is currently constituted,” said Abbott.

“In uncertain, stressful times, it is good to know that a massive, dangerous, project like Energy East does not loom as close as it appeared to a few short months ago.”

According the NEB media release issued this morning, previous decisions that have been voided include:

  • Determination that the Energy East and Eastern Mainline applications are complete;
  • Decision to review the Energy East and Eastern Mainline applications via a single hearing;
  • List of Participants and any subsequent individual rulings on participation;
  • Lists of Issues and factors to be included in the environmental assessments under the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act, 2012; and Hearing Order.
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To arrange an interview contact: Matt Abbott at 506-321-0429

The Fundy Baykeeper works for the Conservation Council to defend the public’s right to a healthy Bay of Fundy. Matt uses a  well-marked boat to patrol the Fundy coastline from Alma to St. Stephen. The Fundy Baykeeper is also part of the international Waterkeeper Alliance.

For more information on how the proposed Energy East pipeline would affect the Bay of Fundy, read the National Resource Defense Council’s report on tanker traffic in the Bay of Fundy: Sensitive Marine Ecosystems Threatened by Energy East’s ‘Aquatic Pipeline.’

For a full list of New Brunswick waterways at risk from Energy East, check out our interactive map.

For more information on the risks of Energy East to the communities of the Bay of Fundy and Gulf of Maine, read the Conservation Council’s report: Tanker Traffic and Tar Balls: What TransCanada’s Energy East Pipeline Means for the Bay of Fundy and Gulf of Maine.

For more on the Energy East pipeline, check out:




PRESS RELEASE

STATEMENT BY CONSERVATION COUNCIL'S MATT ABBOTT ON THE APPOINTMENT OF THE PANEL TO REVIEW THE PROPOSED ENERGY EAST PIPELINE

January 10, 2017

(Fredericton, NB) The Conservation Council’s Fundy Baykeeper says it should be “back to the drawing board” for the review of the proposed Energy East pipeline project, the largest ever pipeline proposed in Canada – one that would cross over 300 rivers and streams in New Brunswick and would export oil from its terminus in Saint John by supertanker across the Bay of Fundy and down through the Gulf of Maine.

“The announcement of the replacement of the project’s review panel members is but one small part of a complicated, and sorely discredited, process,” said Matt Abbott.

“Federal Natural Resources Minister Jim Carr announced an expert panel in November to make recommendations on how the NEB can be modernized, especially with respect to First Nations consultation and support, improved public participation, credible information on the potential impact to Canada’s water systems, including the Bay of Fundy, and squaring oil export with Canada’s plan to reduce carbon pollution,” said Abbott.

“It’s difficult to see how the new panel could embark on any credible process without first seeing the results of the modernization review.“

CCNB first called for a restart of the project review in August, when conflict of interest allegations forced suspension of public hearings and the eventual recusal of the former EE review panel members.

Unresolved issues with respect to any review on the proposed pipeline include whether or not new panel members will hear from scientists, First Nations and environmental groups and fishermen from New Brunswick; whether they will extend the impact zone under review to include the whole Bay of Fundy and whether they will require a complete analysis of both the business case for the pipeline and the impact of eventual spills from it on the natural environment, said Abbott.

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To arrange an interview contact Matt Abbott at (506) 321-0429

For more information on how the proposed Energy East pipeline would affect the Bay of Fundy, read the National Resource Defense Council’s report on tanker traffic in the Bay of Fundy: Sensitive Marine Ecosystems Threatened by Energy East’s ‘Aquatic Pipeline’.

For a full list of New Brunswick waterways at risk from Energy East, check out our interactive map.

For more information on the risks of Energy East to the communities of the Bay of Fundy and Gulf of Maine, read the Conservation Council’s report: Tanker Traffic and Tar Balls: What TransCanada’s Energy East Pipeline Means for the Bay of Fundy and Gulf of Maine.
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Media Advisory

Leading Canadian environmental organizations to outline expectations for Friday’s first ministers meeting on clean growth and climate change

December 7, 2016 (Ottawa, ON) — Erin Flanagan (Pembina Institute), Steven Guilbeault (Équiterre), Catherine Abreu (CAN-Rac), Dale Marshall (Environmental Defence) and Dr. Louise Comeau (CCNB) will host an online media briefing to outline expectations for Friday’s first ministers' meeting on climate change and will respond to questions.

Event: Media briefing and Q&A 
Date: Wednesday, December 7th 2016
Time: 1:00 – 2:00 p.m. (EST)
Location: via GoToMeeting webinar 
RSVP at: Media Briefing Q&A registration

Context: For the first time ever, Canadian political leaders are negotiating a pan-Canadian climate plan to meet or exceed the country’s 2030 emissions reduction target. This webinar will outline trends in Canada’s greenhouse gas emissions in light of recent announcements and will discuss the extent to which governments have made policy commitments commensurate with reducing national emissions by 30% below 2005 levels by 2030.

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Media inquiries:

Erin Flanagan (English / français)
Program Director, Federal Policy, Pembina Institute
587-581-1701

Kelly O’Connor
Communications Lead, Pembina Institute
416-220-8804

Louise Comeau
Director of Climate Change and Energy Solutions, CCNB
506-238-0355
POUR PUBLICATION IMMÉDIATE

COMMUNIQUÉ DE PRESSE

5 décembre, 2016

Stop Spraying NB  a recueilli le plus grand nombre de signatures de pétition jamais ramassé au Nouveau-Brunswick :  13,439 autres signatures à ajouter pour un grand  total de 27,225 afin d’arrêter l’arrosage d’herbicides sur les forêts  publiques ainsi que sous les lignes d’Energie NB

FRÉDÉRICTON – Ce  mardi 6 décembre, 2016,  13,404 signatures ORIGINALES seront déposées à l’Assemblée législative provinciale demandant à ce que la province du Nouveau-Brunswick cesse l’arrosage de pesticides sur les forêts publiques et sous les lignes d’Energie NB. Cette troisième présentation de pétitions représente encore une fois des communautés tout autour de la province incluant des communautés francophones, anglophones et  autochtones.  La pétition continue de prendre son élan et SSNB va continuer  de soumettre d’autres signatures dans le futur.  Une délégation d’organisateurs de différentes communautés  à travers la province représentant "Stop Spraying NB-Arrêtons l’arrosage NB " feront le voyage vers Fredericton  pour une photo devant la législature mardi midi le 6 décembre,  2016.  Certains députés qui supportent la cause ont été invités à se joindre à nous pour cette photo. SSNB a reçu l’information qu’en plus du député de Frédéricton, David Coon, le député  Jake Stewart (sud-ouest Miramichi) va signer la pétition et va également se joindre à nous pour la photo. Le député Jake Stewart s’est  prononcé contre l’arrosage de la forêt durant la  dernière année, et nous sommes heureux qu’il se joigne à nous.

Programme pour la présentation de la pétition:

Mardi 6 décembre, 2016
12:00 (midi) -photo avec les députés supportant la cause
1:00 pm: entrée de façon pacifique dans l’édifice de l’Assemblée législative afin d’être témoin  de la remise de la pétition par le député de Frédéricton, David Coon,  et d’entendre les mots de support des députés qui supportent notre cause.
Endroit: Edifice de l’Assemblée législative provinciale
               706 rue Queen
               Fredericton, NB

Comme vous le savez, le mouvement pour l’arrêt de l’arrosage au Nouveau-Brunswick a subi une croissance rapide depuis la saison de chasse 2015 lorsque les chasseurs ont  observé qu’il n’y avait presque plus de chevreuils dans nos forêts publiques. L’effondrement catastrophique  du cheptel de chevreuil se poursuit, avec la population maintenant rendue au quart de ce qu’elle était 30 ans passés. Une campagne pour ramasser des signatures de pétition qui a  commencé le 16 décembre 2015 avec une soumission initiale de presque 1200 signatures de Kedgwick, a été suivie par la remise de 12,686 signatures le 18 mai, 2016. Cette pétition pour l’arrêt de l’arrosage d’ herbicides sur les forêts publiques et sous les lignes d’Energie NB  est maintenant la  plus GRANDE pétition enregistrée dans l’histoire du Nouveau-Brunswick. Notre  gouvernement a un devoir d’ écouter ces 27,225 électeurs. Ce nombre va continuer de croître, alors que  plusieurs membres de nos communautés deviennent actifs dans ce mouvement. Chaque semaine,  nous avons de nouvelles personnes prêtes à recueillir des signatures dans leur communauté.  En septembre 2016, un Néo-Brunswickois retraité, Amédée Boucher, s’est impliqué  activement pour la cause et a recueilli  7,000 signatures dans la Péninsule acadienne dans une courte période de 2 mois avec quelques autres résidents.  Donc, un événement fut planifié par des organisateurs de Tracadie, supporté par SSNB, afin de discuter de l’arrosage et a connu une bonne participation.  Ce soir-là, le député de Fredericton, David Coon, a pris le temps, malgré son horaire fort occupé, de voyager jusqu'à Tracadie en un vendredi soir, et a reçu un total de 12,877 signatures incluant les signatures recueillies par Amédée Boucher et un autre lot reçu par SSNB  de partout dans la province. Le 2 décembre, 2016 un autre lot de 566 signatures est arrivé dans le courrier de SSNB. Les députés libéraux locaux ont refusé d’assister à cette rencontre.

 "Les gens de la Péninsule acadienne refusent d’être empoisonnés," dit Amédée Boucher, responsable d’avoir recueilli un volume de signatures dans cette zone, "mais la signature de la pétition est seulement le premier pas. Ca va prendre votre présence le 6 décembre afin de laisser un message clair  à nos politiciens: assez, c’est assez." Les  données récentes du Maine Fish and Wildlife, Québec Chasse et Pêche, Ministère des  Ressources naturelles de la Nouvelle-Ecosse et du Nouveau-Brunswick démontre que le nombre de captures  dans le NB sont maintenant à 15% de ce qu’elles étaient  en 1985, alors qu’au Québec, le nombre de capture a triplé et dans le Maine, il est resté relativement stable pour cette même période. La combinaison de l’augmentation des  coupes  à blanc et de l'arrosage de glyphosates  sur les plantations en monoculture de bois mou ont éliminé une très grand quantité de nourriture des chevreuils, supprimant  l’approvisionnement en nourriture à  32,000 de ces bêtes chaque année. Les gens qui vivent près de la forêt ont eux-mêmes remarqué les effets sur la population de chevreuils au NB.

Un guide de la faune et  propriétaire de lots boisés privés, Léo Goguen de Rogersville, est en forêt constamment et a déjà déclaré , "Notre moyen de subsistence dépend de la chasse du gros et petit gibier. Irving non seulement empoisonne la viande qui nous permet de manger mais détruit de nombreux habitats qui permettent à la faune de survivre et de se reproduire.  Nous perdons le revenu des activités de loisirs et nos familles sont dépossédées de nourriture saine provenant de nos forêts.  Léo a aussi été victime de préjudice sur les  effets sur son moyen de subsistance comme propriétaire de lots boisés privés.

Le nord du Nouveau-Brunswick  est grandement troublé par ce qui se passe: "Nous,  à EcoVie, sommes très préoccupés  par ce qui arrive dans nos forêts", dit Clément Arpin, propriétaire à la retraite d’une ancienne usine à valeurs ajoutées, de Kedgwick. "28% de toutes les forêts arrosées au Canada sont au NB et le NB représente 0.7% de la superficie de notre pays. C’est beaucoup d’arrosage de pesticides tout autour nous! Nos belles forêts  mixtes sont transformées en plantations .... une monoculture n’est pas une forêt.  Nous devons réaliser qu’une forêt diversifiée nous apporte de la diversité dans les emplois et une stabilité dans notre économie. On ne peut pas faire du sirop d’ érable  avec des épinettes. Alors pourquoi tuer nos feuillus alors que nos érablières  ont  augmenter leurs revenus  de 1000% dans la dernière  décennie comme l’a déclaré notre Premier Ministre, Brian Gallant, lors d’une de ses visites à Kedgwick?  On doit travailler avec le forêt, mettre nos gens au travail au lieu d’utiliser des pesticides qui détruisent notre belle diversité."

Le député David Coon est depuis longtemps défenseur de la cause pour l’arrêt de l’arrosage d’ herbicides sur les forêts et sous les lignes d’Energie N.B. Le 2 décembre, 2016, David Coon a fait cette puissante déclaration: "Arrêtons la coupe à blanc intensive et disons au revoir à l’arrosage d’herbicides » :
http://greenpartynb.ca/en/8-news/1007-stop-the-runaway-clearcutting-and-say-goodbye-to-herbicide-spraying. Cette citation dans sa déclaration en dit long: "Notre province  est une de trois dernières provinces canadiennes s'accrochant à cette pratique, malgré de nombreuses pétitions semblables à celle-ci , et des voix s’objectant depuis longtemps provenant de nos milieux ruraux . Ils ont droit à un environnement sûr, à vivre sans peur pour leur bien-être et celui de la faune qui habite nos forêts." "Le fait que ce sont les contribuables qui paient pour l’arrosage de nos forêts à un coût de $ 2.4m/année est juste ridicule", dit le Dr. Caroline Lubbe-D’Arcy, organisatrice du groupe SSNB. "De plus,  notre gestion forestière crée moins emplois que jamais auparavant, ce qui ne fait aucun sens. Nous avons besoin de remettre au travail nos équipes d’éclaircisseurs.  Nous laissons des travailleurs formés assis chez eux pour soutenir une pratique de gestion forestière qui est non durable.   Ces gens pourraient être au travail et contribuer à notre économie au lieu d’être en manque d’emploi."

SVP venez rencontrer des membres pour l’arrêt de l’arrosage  et autres Néo-Brunswickois qui sont grandement préoccupés par la poursuite de cette pratique en dehors l’édifice de l’Assemblée législative ce mardi 6 décembre, 2016 à midi. Tous les dirigeants politiques  et députés sont invités à assister et démontrer leur soutien.

Contacts pour les médias: (seront présents à l’événement à Frédéricton)
Dr. Caroline Lubbe-D’Arcy, SSNB,Fredericton, cellulaire 506-292-7503 (contact médias anglais)
André Arpin, ECOVIE , Kedgwick, cellulaire: 506-284-0593 (contact médias français)
Amédée Boucher, Péninsule acadienne, cellulaire: 709-792-4033

New Post from New Brunswick Anti-Shale Gas Alliance

Let’s close the door on shale gas development once and for all

Commentary by Jim Emberger (Fredericton Gleaner, Nov 23, 2016) We applaud the Gallant government’s decision to amend the Clean Environment Act to ban the disposal of fracking wastewater in municipal and provincial sewage treatment systems.    The scientific studies behind the decision have long noted that municipal wastewater systems were not…

Read more …

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Media Advisory

CCNB available for comment on new report calling on federal government 
to phase-out coal powered electricity generation by 2030

What: Dr. Louise Comeau, the Conservation Council’s Director of Climate Change and Energy Solutions, will be available to respond to questions about a new report, Out with the coal, in with the new: National benefits of an accelerated phase-out of coal-fired power. The report will be released in Ottawa by the Pembina Institute in collaboration with CCNB and other health and environmental groups. The report assesses the potential health and climate change benefits from phasing coal out of electricity production by 2030.

When: Monday, November 21, 2016, 11 am. Atlantic

Who: Dr. Louise Comeau Director of Climate Change and Energy Solutions.

Where: Conservation Council of New Brunswick, 180 St. John St., Fredericton, NB

Why: Burning coal to generate electricity contributes to air pollution affecting human health, as well as climate change through high levels of greenhouse gases per MWh of electricity produced. There is a global movement away from coal to secure health and climate protection benefits. We are asking the federal Government to announce an accelerated coal phase-out in the lead up to First Ministers meeting in Ottawa December 9, 2016.

Contacts:Louise Comeau, louise.comeau@conservationcouncil.ca506 238 0355
Barb MacKinnon, New Brunswick Lung Association, barb.mackinnon@nb.lung.ca506 455 8961

Archives des nouvelles des groupes

Appels à l'action

Resquest for letters of support: Proposed name restoration for the Wolastoq

dimanche 30 avril 2017
by Alma
 The Wolastoq Grand Council supports our YOUTH GROUPS on their proposal for changing the name of the Saint John River, back to it’s original and proper name; Wolastoq (the beautiful & bountiful river ). We see this as a good place to begin the process of implementing the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples; which was strongly recommended by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission.  

Proposed Name Restoration: 
  • The name Saint John River back to it’s original indigenous name -  Wolastoq
Purpose: 
  • Wolastoq; (the beautiful river) is the original Indigenous name of the River.
  • Wolastoq is the name sake for the real identity and unique nationality of our People; the Wolastoqiyik.  Respecting the rights of Wolastoqiyik.
  • Scientific studies have now confirmed, what our people have always known; “that water has memory”.    This river will remember its original name.   
  • This deed would begin a process for reconciliation with a show of goodwill on the part of the Government of New Brunswick, and would;
  • Create opportunities for discussions and engagement around indigenous issues.
  • Wolastoqiyik have a right to retain their own names for communities, places and persons. 

The Wolastoq Grand Council is requesting support letters from our Allies; as individuals, organizations, and/or Groups.  For more information, contact Alma Brooks, 506-478-1256, almabrooks.26@outlook.com

Please send support letters to the following addresses:

The Wolastoq Grand Council,
Grand Chief; Ron Tremblay
50 Maliseet Drive
Fredericton, NB, E3A 2V9


David Coon
Office of the Green Party Leader
P.O. Box 6000
Fredericton, NB, E3B 5H1

Additional Information

  1. Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada
Carolyn Bennett; Minister of Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada; has assured the Wolastoq Grand Council in writing that; - “Canada is committed to a renewed nation to nation relationship with indigenous peoples based on the recognition of rights, respect, cooperation and partnership.”   Carolyn Bennett also stated that ; - “Achieving full reconciliation between indigenous and non-indigenous people in Canada is at the heart of Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada’s mandate, and that the government of “Canada will engage with Indigenous peoples, provinces, territories, and Canadians on how to implement the Declaration in accordance with Canada’s Constitution”.

  1. Andrea Bear-Nicholas
As described in a 2011 article by Andrea Bear-Nicholas, Maliseet historian:  
  1. The first step in the dispossession for the indigenous peoples in the Maritimes began in earnest immediately after the British capture of the French fort at Louisbourg in 1758.   Where place names and names of First Nations in the entire region had been inscribed on earlier maps; both would soon be erased by colonial cartographers in a process described by J. B. Harley as cartographic colonialism.  The justifications for these erasures was found in the doctrine of discovery.   
  2. The second step in the dispossession of indigenous peoples in Nova Scotia began immediately after signing of the Treaty of 1760 by Passamaquoddy and Maliseet Leaders, and later the signing of the Mascarene Treaty.   Although there was no surrender of any lands in either of these Treaties; 1.5 million acres of Maliseet land which outlawed the surveying and expropriation of lands not yet ceded by the indigenous inhabitants or purchased by the Crown.    


  3. United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples
The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples:   Articles 1, 2, 6, & 13   support and provide a guide for the implementation leading to reconciliation.

As a distinct ‘people,’ we have a right to our accurate identity and nationality.
  • Indigenous Peoples have the right to the full enjoyment as a collective or as individuals of all human rights and fundamental freedoms as recognized in the Charter of the United Nations, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and international human rights law. 
  • Indigenous peoples and individuals are free and equal to all other peoples and individuals and have the right to be free from any kind of discrimination, in the exercise of their rights, in particular that based on their indigenous origin and identity. 
  • Every indigenous individual has the right to their own nationality. 
  • Indigenous people have a right to retain their own names for communities, places and persons.  “States shall take effective measures to ensure that this right is protected”.

APPEL À L'ACTION: Rétablir le financement au Réseau canadien de l’environnement

vendredi 3 février 2017
by Raissa Marks
APPEL À L’ACTION - Le Réseau canadien de l’environnement (RCEN) et ses réseaux provinciaux affiliés ont besoin de votre aide !

Dans le passé, le Réseau canadien de l’environnement et les réseaux provinciaux affiliés incluant le RENB ont reçu un financement annuel de base du gouvernement du Canada. Ce financement était utilisé pour faciliter le réseautage sur les questions environnementales nationales, pour coordonner les caucus nationaux et provinciaux sur les enjeux spécifiques, pour coordonner la participation des ONGE aux processus de consultation publique du gouvernement fédéral, et pour maintenir actives les lignes de communication entre les ONGE et le gouvernement fédéral.

En 2011, à la suite des réductions systématiques de budget des organisations civiles par l’administration fédérale précédente, toutes les subventions fédérales au RCEN et à ses réseaux provinciaux affiliés ont été coupées. Ce qui a laissé le réseau national et la plupart des réseaux affiliés se débrouiller principalement grâce au bénévolat avec des moyens limités pour accomplir leur travail.

On espère que l’administration actuelle va renouveler le financement du RCEN lors du prochain budget. Ce financement est essentiel pour la survie du réseau national et pour plusieurs des réseaux provinciaux affiliés. Une proposition a été soumise. C’est le temps maintenant de démontrer l’appui solide et immédiat des groupes environnementaux et de la population partout au pays.

C’est ici que vous entrez en jeu !

Veuillez prendre quelques minutes pour écrire au premier ministre Trudeau et à votre député pour leur dire pourquoi vous estimez le RCEN, votre réseau provincial affilié, ou le réseautage environnemental à l’échelle nationale en général. N’hésitez pas à utiliser le modèle de lettre inclus ci-dessous. Vous pouvez la personnaliser en vous fondant sur votre expérience ou simplement la copier-coller.

L’adresse électronique du premier ministre Trudeau est justin.trudeau@parl.gc.ca et vous pouvez trouver l’adresse électronique de votre député au http://www.parl.gc.ca/Parliamentarians/fr/members.

Démontrons à nos politiciens fédéraux qu’une communauté environnementale de base bien connectée est essentielle pour un Canada fort !

Modèle de lettre suggérée :

Monsieur le premier ministre,

Je vous écris pour vous demander que le financement annuel de base accordé au Réseau canadien de l’environnement (RCEN) soit rétabli.

Traditionnellement, le RCEN a fourni un lien essentiel entre les groupes environnementaux grands et petits à travers le Canada. Ces liens sont vitaux pour aider les collectivités à s’occuper des enjeux environnementaux dans tout le pays et pour s’assurer qu’une approche robuste au développement d’une politique environnementale existe au Canada.

Depuis que les subventions ont été éliminées en 2011, le RCEN et la plupart de ses réseaux provinciaux affiliés ont dû fonctionner principalement en se fondant sur le bénévolat avec une capacité réduite pour accomplir leur travail. Ce n’est pas acceptable. Une communauté environnementale de base bien connectée est essentielle pour un Canada fort. Je vous encourage à rétablir immédiatement le financement de base pour ces travaux importants.

Recevez, monsieur le premier ministre, l’expression de notre haute considération.
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