January 15, 2014 (Fredericton, NB) – The Nature Trust of New Brunswick (NTNB)is inviting the general public to a series of community information sessions throughout the Lower St. John River region from January 26 to January 31, 2014. Over the past three years, NTNB has been developing a conservation strategy for the Lower St. John River region, with a goal to guide future conservation efforts and more actively involve the public in land conservation and stewardship of ecologically sensitive areas.

“The Lower St. John River region is a rich landscape that is home to a diversity of plant, animal, insect, and bird species - many of them rare and endangered such as the Cobblestone Tiger Beetle and the Peregrine Falcon,” says Aaron Dowding, NTNB Conservation Planning Manager. “Protecting these habitats can help ensure that the beauty and diversity we see today will remain for generations to come.”

The development of this conservation strategy has been a complex yet rewarding process, involving the extensive analysis of relevant data and the close collaboration of many partners including federal and provincial government scientists, conservation groups, researchers, and naturalist organizations. Having now identified important areas for conservation in the region, NTNB is seeking to actively engage New Brunswickers in land conservation and stewardship efforts, with the first step being a series of informative open house events.

"We hope that those interested in these initiatives can join us in taking a hands-on role in stewarding the forests, wetlands, and rivers in this region for future generations. And, we are here to give them the tools to do so," says Dowding.

NTNB and its partners invite everyone with an interest in conservation to attend an open house in their community, where information will be provided about species at risk, important habitats, private land stewardship, and the overall Lower St. John River conservation strategy.

"Our community tour gives us an opportunity to share our learnings about the Lower St. John River region. For example, landowners may not know that they have endangered species on their property, so we can help inform them about that,” says Dowding. “On the other hand, there is also a lot we can learn about the ecology of the region from landowners and what they have observed over time.”

Please join NTNB for an open house in your community:

  • Keswick Ridge - Sun., Jan. 26, Keswick Ridge Community Hall (84 Route 616) from 2 to 3:30 pm

  • Taymouth - Mon., Jan. 27, Taymouth Community Centre (864 Route 8) from 7 to 8 pm

  • Hampton - Tues., Jan. 28, Lighthouse River Centre (1075 Main St) from 6:30 to 8 pm

  • Grand Bay-Westfield - Wed., Jan. 29, Community Centrum (609 River Valley Dr) at 7 pm

  • Sussex - Thurs., Jan. 30, Sussex Public Library (46 Magnolia Dr) at 6:30 pm

  • Gagetown - Fri., Jan. 31, Royal Canadian Legion (81 Tilley Rd) from 7:30 to 8:30 pm

    About the Nature Trust of New Brunswick

    The Nature Trust of New Brunswick is a non-profit, non-governmental organization dedicated to preserving New Brunswick’s outstanding ecological landscapes for people and nature. Nature Trust NB currently protects 37 nature preserves in the province. For more information about the organization, visit naturetrust.nb.ca.

News from Groups Archives

Action Alerts

ACTION ALERT: Reinstate funding to the Canadian Environmental Network

Friday, 03 February 2017
by Raissa Marks
The Canadian Environmental Network and its provincial affiliate networks need your help!

Historically, the Canadian Environmental Network and its provincial affiliate networks including the NBEN received annual core funding from the Government of Canada. This was used to facilitate networking on environmental issues across the country, coordinate national and provincial issue-based caucuses, coordinate ENGO participation in federal public consultation processes, and maintain open lines of communication between ENGOs and the federal government.

In 2011, as part of the across-the-board cuts to civil society organizations by the previous federal government, all federal funding to the RCEN and its provincial affiliate networks was cut. This left the national network and most of the affiliates with functioning primarily on a voluntary basis with limited capacity to do their work.

There is hope that the current government will provide for renewed funding in its upcoming budget. This funding is crucial for the survival of the national network and many of the provincial affiliate networks. A proposal has been submitted. It now needs strong and immediate support from environmental groups and individuals across the country.

This is where you come in!

Please take a few minutes to write to Prime Minister Trudeau and your MP telling them why you value the RCEN, your provincial affiliate network, or environmental networking at the national level in general. Feel free to use the template letter provided below. You can personalize it based on your experience or simply copy and paste.

Trudeau’s email is justin.trudeau@parl.gc.ca and you can find your MP’s email here: http://www.parl.gc.ca/Parliamentarians/en/members

Let’s show our federal politicians that a strong, well-connected grassroots environmental community is essential to a strong Canada!

Draft Template Letter:

Dear Prime Minister Trudeau,

I am writing to ask that annual core funding to the Canadian Environmental Network (RCEN) be reinstated.

Historically, the RCEN provided a crucial link between environmental groups across the country, both large and small. This link was vital in helping communities address environmental issues right across the country and ensuring a robust approach to the development of environmental policy in Canada.

Since funding was cut in 2011, the RCEN and most of its provincial affiliate networks have been functioning primarily on a voluntary basis with limited capacity to do their work. This is not acceptable. A strong, well-connected grassroots environmental community is essential to a strong Canada. I urge you to reinstate core funding for this crucial work immediately.

Sincerely,

Still Time to Submit Comments - Snowmobile Trail Development up Mount Carleton

Monday, 21 November 2016
by Roberta Clowater, Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society - New Brunswick Chapter
You can still send in your comments until end of day Nov 21 (Monday) on the environmental assessment report about the proposed snowmobile trail at Mount Carleton Provincial Park. If you're not sure what to say, Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society - NB Chapter has summarized some of our key messages here: http://cpawsnb.org/images/upload/key_messages_EIA.pdf

Please send comments or questions to: lynn.white@gnb.ca or mail to: Lynn White, Department of Tourism, Heritage and Culture, P.O. Box 6000, Fredericton, NB E3B 5H1.