September 15th, 2015
For immediate release


Innovative outdoor education program launched


Moncton - The Sustainability Education Alliance of New Brunswick (SEA) is launching Great Minds Think Outside, a hands-on, curriculum-linked, outdoor professional development program for teachers and educators. 

  “This program is the first if its kind in New Brunswick. It will give the teachers and educators the skills, tools, and resources they need to teach their students outside,” said Raissa Marks, Executive Director of the New Brunswick Environmental Network.  “This program will empower youth to become leaders in building sustainable communities through learning and increased environmental awareness,”.

 The workshop sessions will be delivered by a team of highly qualified and experienced professionals from all around the province who specialize in outdoor education, nature education, and environmental education. “There are many benefits to teaching outdoors for both the students and educators. Mental and physical health and wellness improve, and disruptive behaviours have been shown to decrease significantly. Spending more time outside also develops a stronger connection with nature and leads to a more active lifestyle,” stated Roland Chiasson, one of Great Minds Think Outside’s trainers.  “Any and all learning outcomes can be met outside with hands-on creativity. Our role as trainers is to ensure the perceived barriers to teaching outside are addressed and overcome through the relevant teaching methods”. 

According to Marcy Malloy, Community School Coordinator at Cambridge-Narrows Community School, “This program is a great opportunity to maintain the bridge between the school and the community. The skills you learn when teaching and learning outdoors are reflected in your behaviours and actions outside of the classroom. This program will help develop more environmentally-conscious communities.”

Half-day and full-day professional development sessions are available. The topics include approaches of “how” to teach outside, as well as “what” to teach outside. Limited subsidies are available. For more information on Great Minds Think Outside and to book a session, visit www.nben.ca/greatminds or call 506-855-4144. 


Start the new school year on the right foot! 

Contact: 

Roland Chiasson, Aster Group Environmental Services Cooperative, 506-536-1260

Serge LaRochelle, Groupe de développement durable du pays de Cocagne, 506- 576-8247

Raissa Marks, New Brunswick Environmental Network, office: 506-855-4144, cell: 506-588-2980.

News from Groups Archives

Upcoming Events


Government Pre-Budget Public Consultation
Thu, Oct 19th, 2017
Shippagan

Roundtable on Disaster Risk Reduction and Climate Change Adaptation
Mon, Oct 23rd, 2017
Halifax

Government Pre-Budget Public Consultation
Mon, Oct 23rd, 2017
Moncton

Action Alerts

Call for nominations for the NBEN Awards - 2017

Monday, 31 July 2017
by Annika Chiasson
Every day people and environmental groups take action to protect and restore New Brunswick’s environment.  

Over this past year, who stands out in your mind? 

We invite you to nominate a group or individual deserving of one of the NBEN awards which will be presented in style at Eco-Confluence 2017.  Send an e-mail to nben@nben.ca describing your nominee’s work.  Nominees must be members or associates of the NBEN*.

Nomination deadline is September 13, 2017.

*Current NBEN Steering Committee members are not eligible for awards.

Resquest for letters of support: Proposed name restoration for the Wolastoq

Sunday, 30 April 2017
by Alma
 The Wolastoq Grand Council supports our YOUTH GROUPS on their proposal for changing the name of the Saint John River, back to it’s original and proper name; Wolastoq (the beautiful & bountiful river ). We see this as a good place to begin the process of implementing the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples; which was strongly recommended by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission.  

Proposed Name Restoration: 
  • The name Saint John River back to it’s original indigenous name -  Wolastoq
Purpose: 
  • Wolastoq; (the beautiful river) is the original Indigenous name of the River.
  • Wolastoq is the name sake for the real identity and unique nationality of our People; the Wolastoqiyik.  Respecting the rights of Wolastoqiyik.
  • Scientific studies have now confirmed, what our people have always known; “that water has memory”.    This river will remember its original name.   
  • This deed would begin a process for reconciliation with a show of goodwill on the part of the Government of New Brunswick, and would;
  • Create opportunities for discussions and engagement around indigenous issues.
  • Wolastoqiyik have a right to retain their own names for communities, places and persons. 

The Wolastoq Grand Council is requesting support letters from our Allies; as individuals, organizations, and/or Groups.  For more information, contact Alma Brooks, 506-478-1256, almabrooks.26@outlook.com

Please send support letters to the following addresses:

The Wolastoq Grand Council,
Grand Chief; Ron Tremblay
50 Maliseet Drive
Fredericton, NB, E3A 2V9


David Coon
Office of the Green Party Leader
P.O. Box 6000
Fredericton, NB, E3B 5H1

Additional Information

  1. Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada
Carolyn Bennett; Minister of Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada; has assured the Wolastoq Grand Council in writing that; - “Canada is committed to a renewed nation to nation relationship with indigenous peoples based on the recognition of rights, respect, cooperation and partnership.”   Carolyn Bennett also stated that ; - “Achieving full reconciliation between indigenous and non-indigenous people in Canada is at the heart of Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada’s mandate, and that the government of “Canada will engage with Indigenous peoples, provinces, territories, and Canadians on how to implement the Declaration in accordance with Canada’s Constitution”.

  1. Andrea Bear-Nicholas
As described in a 2011 article by Andrea Bear-Nicholas, Maliseet historian:  
  1. The first step in the dispossession for the indigenous peoples in the Maritimes began in earnest immediately after the British capture of the French fort at Louisbourg in 1758.   Where place names and names of First Nations in the entire region had been inscribed on earlier maps; both would soon be erased by colonial cartographers in a process described by J. B. Harley as cartographic colonialism.  The justifications for these erasures was found in the doctrine of discovery.   
  2. The second step in the dispossession of indigenous peoples in Nova Scotia began immediately after signing of the Treaty of 1760 by Passamaquoddy and Maliseet Leaders, and later the signing of the Mascarene Treaty.   Although there was no surrender of any lands in either of these Treaties; 1.5 million acres of Maliseet land which outlawed the surveying and expropriation of lands not yet ceded by the indigenous inhabitants or purchased by the Crown.    


  3. United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples
The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples:   Articles 1, 2, 6, & 13   support and provide a guide for the implementation leading to reconciliation.

As a distinct ‘people,’ we have a right to our accurate identity and nationality.
  • Indigenous Peoples have the right to the full enjoyment as a collective or as individuals of all human rights and fundamental freedoms as recognized in the Charter of the United Nations, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and international human rights law. 
  • Indigenous peoples and individuals are free and equal to all other peoples and individuals and have the right to be free from any kind of discrimination, in the exercise of their rights, in particular that based on their indigenous origin and identity. 
  • Every indigenous individual has the right to their own nationality. 
  • Indigenous people have a right to retain their own names for communities, places and persons.  “States shall take effective measures to ensure that this right is protected”.
Communiqué de presse: Lancement d’un programme novateur en éducation en plein air