Despite the declaration in last Saturday’s Telegraph Journal, there are several folks willing to declare that Mount Carleton is not the toughest trail to climb in Mount Carleton Park. The trail up Mount Sagamook is definitely a much more challenging hiking trail. The trail is steep and rocky for most of the distance, if you hike up the right hand trail to the outcrops that are most often featured in photos of the park.

On Friday, June 5th a group of hikers consisting NB Parks staff, a Friends of Mount Carleton representative and three members of a group named A for Adventure. “A for Adventure is all about inspiring people to get outdoors and experience adventure.” The members of the group endeavour to go on adventures, large and small, and by taking their message to the media, they hope to encourage others to get outside.

In August 2013, Jan LaPierre and Graham Carter had just finished a 200 km plus kayak paddle to Cape Sable Island. “Paddle to Sable” raised funds and awareness to create a camp for kids struggling with mental health issues at Brigadoon Village. “

On the trip home from their epic paddle, Jan began to recite a poem he was thinking up. He asked his friends if they could put together an adventure children’s book. They were all so enthused with the concept, that they stopped the car and went on a hike to discuss the idea. On that hike a book was born.

“A is for adventure, as you will come to see.
Like hiking or biking or climbing a tree,

Or taking a plane to a far away land,

Or a trip to the beach to play in the sand. “

The idea took flight and currently their group includes not only Jan LaPierre and Chris Surrette, but a recent addition is photographer Brad Sayeau. Christopher Hoyt agreed to illustrate their book, “A is for Adventure”, which is due out this month.

Meanwhile the group are taking in as many adventures as they can, in the hopes of encouraging folks young and old to get outside and see and experience the world around them. Many of their adventures are in our parks and last week they came to Mount Carleton Park, where they helped to paddle a large canoe on Little Nictau Lake and climbed Mount Sagamook. They agreed that the challenging climb was well worth the effort, once they took in the panoramic view offered from the iconic rock outcrops at the top of Sagamook. Despite the threat of rain, it held off until the group reached the parking lot at the foot of Mount Sagamook, insuring that all the camera gear was kept safely dry.

When asked for his opinion of Mount Carleton Park, Jan LaPierre summed up his experience there by saying;”Mount Carleton Park is one of those places that can’t be summed up in words. And I’m so grateful for that. It’s a place that needs to be seen, but more importantly, felt. Where, because of its authentic beauty you can” let go.”

Jan feels so passionately about his experiences in the park, that since his trip last Friday he has been talking about the park nonstop, to anyone who will listen. Jan’s only regret is that he had not come to the park sooner, but a return trip to the park is definitely in his near future.
A for Adventure advocates for a fitter population by declaring; “Get outside and do any kind of adventure, large or small. Adventure can be right in your own backyard.”
You may soon log on to their Facebook and website, to access more information and photos taken on their trip to Mount Carleton Park.

John Connell Bernadette Michaud Ian Smith and Brigitte Donald from NB Parks
John Connell, Bernadette Michaud, Ian Smith and Brigitte Clavette
from NB Parks
Labrador tea
Labrador tea
L R John Connell Jan LaPierre Chris Surette Brad SayeauIan Smith Brigitte Clavette Susan Mulherin
L-R John Connell, Jan LaPierre, Chris Surette, Brad Sayeau,Ian Smith,
Brigitte Clavette, Susan Mulherin
Little Nictau Lake
Little Nictau Lake
Nature Paddle
Paddle
Outlook on Mount Sagamook
Outlook on Mount Sagamook
Purple trilliums on the trail
Purple trilliums on the trail
Stunted birch near the top of Mount Sagamook
Stunted birch near the top of Mount Sagamook
Sumi on the summit
Sumi on the summit
Top of the Mount Sagamook Trail
Top of the Mount Sagamook Trail

News from Groups Archives

Upcoming Events

Linear Regression Analysis for Aquatic Scientists 2-day workshop presented by the Canadian Rivers Institute
Mon, Feb 20th, 2017
University of New Brunswick

NB Power General Rate Application - Public Hearing hosted by NBEUB
Mon, Feb 20th, 2017
Fredericton Convention Centre (Copy)

Game Night @ Unplugged Fredericton
Mon, Feb 20th, 2017
Unplugged Board Games Cafe

Action Alerts

ACTION ALERT: Reinstate funding to the Canadian Environmental Network

Friday, 03 February 2017
by Raissa Marks
The Canadian Environmental Network and its provincial affiliate networks need your help!

Historically, the Canadian Environmental Network and its provincial affiliate networks including the NBEN received annual core funding from the Government of Canada. This was used to facilitate networking on environmental issues across the country, coordinate national and provincial issue-based caucuses, coordinate ENGO participation in federal public consultation processes, and maintain open lines of communication between ENGOs and the federal government.

In 2011, as part of the across-the-board cuts to civil society organizations by the previous federal government, all federal funding to the RCEN and its provincial affiliate networks was cut. This left the national network and most of the affiliates with functioning primarily on a voluntary basis with limited capacity to do their work.

There is hope that the current government will provide for renewed funding in its upcoming budget. This funding is crucial for the survival of the national network and many of the provincial affiliate networks. A proposal has been submitted. It now needs strong and immediate support from environmental groups and individuals across the country.

This is where you come in!

Please take a few minutes to write to Prime Minister Trudeau and your MP telling them why you value the RCEN, your provincial affiliate network, or environmental networking at the national level in general. Feel free to use the template letter provided below. You can personalize it based on your experience or simply copy and paste.

Trudeau’s email is justin.trudeau@parl.gc.ca and you can find your MP’s email here: http://www.parl.gc.ca/Parliamentarians/en/members

Let’s show our federal politicians that a strong, well-connected grassroots environmental community is essential to a strong Canada!

Draft Template Letter:

Dear Prime Minister Trudeau,

I am writing to ask that annual core funding to the Canadian Environmental Network (RCEN) be reinstated.

Historically, the RCEN provided a crucial link between environmental groups across the country, both large and small. This link was vital in helping communities address environmental issues right across the country and ensuring a robust approach to the development of environmental policy in Canada.

Since funding was cut in 2011, the RCEN and most of its provincial affiliate networks have been functioning primarily on a voluntary basis with limited capacity to do their work. This is not acceptable. A strong, well-connected grassroots environmental community is essential to a strong Canada. I urge you to reinstate core funding for this crucial work immediately.

Sincerely,

Still Time to Submit Comments - Snowmobile Trail Development up Mount Carleton

Monday, 21 November 2016
by Roberta Clowater, Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society - New Brunswick Chapter
You can still send in your comments until end of day Nov 21 (Monday) on the environmental assessment report about the proposed snowmobile trail at Mount Carleton Provincial Park. If you're not sure what to say, Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society - NB Chapter has summarized some of our key messages here: http://cpawsnb.org/images/upload/key_messages_EIA.pdf

Please send comments or questions to: lynn.white@gnb.ca or mail to: Lynn White, Department of Tourism, Heritage and Culture, P.O. Box 6000, Fredericton, NB E3B 5H1.