The NBEN is pleased to be the local host partner for EconoUs 2018, the annual conference of the Canadian Community Economic Development Network, which is coming to Moncton in September 2018.
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With a focus on green community economic development, EconoUs 2018 will feature leading speakers, engaging sessions, and tailored networking opportunities about People (inclusive communities), Planet (sustainable environments), and Economy (local prosperity) and how these things, together, create an economy that works for all.Who or what should be included in the agenda?  Let the planning committee know here:  https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/V2QXMY2
A new logo for the NBEN was launched at the Eco-Confluence gathering last weekend!
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The violet, as New Brunswick’s provincial flower, represents the province and its environment.  The centre is the network which brings us all together.

The logo was designed by Annika Chiasson, the NBEN’s Communications Coordinator and talented graphic designer.
For Immediate Release
October 30, 2017

On Saturday, October 28, 2017, an environmental award was presented to New Brunswick citizens in honour of exemplary service to their community.

The Red Head Anthony’s Cove Preservation Association was honoured with the Phoenix Award “in recognition of their unfaltering and ultimately successful commitment to defending their community and home from the threat of heavy industrial development.” The Phoenix Award is dedicated annually to a group or individual who has dedicated their efforts to policies and legislation and have been through “the fire”.

The tank farm and marine export terminal for the Energy East pipeline were slated to be built in Red Head, in East Saint John. Concern over the environmental impact of this project to their home community and communities across the country and around the Bay of Fundy caused local residents to organize against the Energy East pipeline. Due to their efforts, alongside those of many along the entire route of the proposed pipeline, the Energy East proposal was withdrawn by TransCanada earlier this month.

Raissa Marks, Executive Director of the New Brunswick Environmental Network, praised the efforts of the Red Head Anthony’s Cove Preservation Association. “They impressed many in the environmental movement and beyond. They showed that dedicated, hard-working citizens can stand up to big industry, build broad alliances, and come out of a big challenge stronger and more united. Red Head residents were at ‘the end of the line’, and showed that, regardless of where you are located, standing up matters.”

The award was presented during the New Brunswick Environmental Network’s annual meeting, Eco-Confluence, which was held in Fredericton over the weekend. Each year, significant efforts by citizens and citizen groups toward the protection and restoration of New Brunswick’s environment are recognized at a special awards ceremony.

The New Brunswick Environmental Network is a non-profit communications network of over 100 citizens’ environmental groups from across the province. The goal of the Network is to encourage communication and collaboration among groups and between groups, government and other sectors.

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Award Presentation Gordon Lynaya for web
Gordon Dalzell, Citizens Coalition for Clean Air, presenting the 2017 Phoenix Award to Lynaya Astephen, Red Head Anthony's Cove Preservation Association.  Photo Credit: Pascale Ouellette
For immediate release
Date: September 18th, 2017

Dundas, NB - This past Friday, the New Brunswick Environmental Network in collaboration with École Notre-Dame and the Pays de Cocagne Sustainable Development Group launched the 2017 Branch Out, Make Waves challenge at École Notre-Dame.

“Branch Out, Make Waves” challenges youth and community groups to work together in their local community to help conserve New Brunswick landscapes and shorelines. Over 400 young New Brunswickers participated last year, together planting 1254 trees and cleaning 20 hectares of shoreline!

“This is a great opportunity for youth to contribute to conservation and to create partnerships with environmental groups in their community. I look forward to the 2017 challenge and what it will bring,” said Pascale Ouellette, Education and Outreach Programs Coordinator with the New Brunswick Environmental Network.

The launch on the 15th was also one of the 150 tree planting events across the country in 2017 to commemorate Canada’s 150th. This project is made possible in part by the Government of Canada, Tree Canada, the EcoAction Community Funding Program, UNI Coopération FInancière, and the many dedicated volunteers across the province.
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Contact Person:
Pascale Ouellette, Education and Outreach Programs Coordinator, NBEN
Tel: 506-855-4144
Email: nben@nben.ca

 
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Tree Canada representative, Fabrice Parisi, speaking on Tree Canada’s role in tree planting events through Canada.

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Students of École Notre-Dame welcoming ceremony attendees.
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The documentary film, Every Living Thing -­ experiencing a bioblitz, will take you on an amazing journey of what it's like to spend four weeks over two summers exploring all aspects of nature – fish, insects, plants, fungi, reptiles, amphibians and mammals - that live in NB’s own Grand Lake Protected Natural Area.

Celebrate the UN Decade of Biodiversity – host a film screening in your community!

Unlike reality TV, this documentary film features real scientists speaking about real issues affecting real people living in real communities.

Every Living Thing was produced by NB-based company, Flower Power Production, in collaboration with the New Brunswick Museum's BiotaNB program.  BiotaNB is a 20-year biodiversity research project to identify and catalogue as many species in the province of New Brunswick, before human encroachment and climate change intensifies.  The NBEN is partnering with Flower Power Production to promote community film screenings of this film across Canada. 
There are so many government consultations going on that it’s hard to keep track! We’re making it a bit easier by compiling a list of those of interest to environmental groups and their deadlines:

Pre-budget Provincial
New Brunswickers are invited to attend upcoming public meetings focused on priorities for the 2017-18 budget. November 16-December 5

Electoral Reform Provincial
The Commission on Electoral Reform is looking at alternative voting systems, voting age, and other election rules. Deadline: November 30

Navigable Waters Federal
Review of the previous government’s changes to the Navigable Waters Protection Act. Deadline: December 7

Environmental Protection Act Federal
Comprehensive review of the provisions and operation of theCanadian Environmental Protection Act. Deadline: December 1

Charities Federal
Modernization of the rules governing charities and their political activities. Deadline: December 9

Environmental Assessment Federal
Comprehensive review of Canada’s environmental assessment processes. Deadline: December 18

Fisheries Federal
Review of the 2012-13 changes to the Fisheries Act made by the previous government. Comments welcome on restoring habitat protections that were lost and also on incorporating modern safeguards. No deadline mentioned but the committee responsible is submitting its report in “early 2017”.

National Energy Board Federal
A targeted review of the NEB’s structure, role and mandate under the National Energy Board Act. Deadline: January 17

Clean Air Act Operating Approval – Irving Provincial
Renewal of the Approval to Operate for the Irving Pulp and Paper Limited Reversing Falls Complex in Saint John. Deadline: March 7
For immediate release
November 22, 2016
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Fredericton – The New Brunswick Environmental Network celebrated its 25th anniversary over the weekend. During the celebration, special recognition was given to seven groups that have been members of the network for 25 years: Atlantic Salmon Federation, Vertige at Mathieu-Martin High School, Conservation Council of New Brunswick, Grand Manan Whale and Seabird Research Station, Nature NB, Nature Trust of New Brunswick, and Trees International.

There are now 100 citizen-based environmental groups from across New Brunswick in the Network. “It was a double milestone,” said Raissa Marks, Executive Director of the NBEN. “It was perfectly fitting to approve the membership of our 100th group during the 25th anniversary event.”

“Nature NB is excited to have been part of the NBEN for 25 years,” said Vanessa Roy-McDougall, Executive Director of Nature NB. “The NBEN's diligent work over the years has allowed us to connect with other environmental groups and has made our efforts to conserve New Brunswick's natural heritage even stronger."

Lois Corbett, Executive Director of the Conservation Council of New Brunswick, added that her group is “...proud to have been part of NBEN for 25 years. The Network's groups and their members, including the Conservation Council, represent citizens from all over the province and by working together, we've become a strong united voice for clean water and air and for a thriving, greener economy.”

Youth environmental groups have always been an important part of the Network, as explained by Mylène Chavarie of Vertige at Mathieu-Martin High School, “Vertige is extremely proud to be part of the NBEN. The resources provided by the Network have been useful to us over the course of the last 25 years. Our committee is honoured to have been part of the NBEN since the beginning.”

Laurie Murison, of the Grand Manan Whale & Seabird Research Station, reflected back on the last 25 years. “We were happy to join a network of New Brunswick environmental groups 25 years ago. At that time, communication among groups was limited to phone calls, mail outs, or meetings. The need to connect with others, and the chance to learn new skills, was beneficial and desirable. The development of a strong network in New Brunswick over the years with increased membership has strengthened our resolve to remain a member.”

The 25th anniversary celebration, held in Fredericton on Saturday November 19, was attended by over 100 people representing 53 environmental groups from around the province.

The Network’s mandate is to improve communication and co-operation among environmental groups and between these groups, government, and other sectors.

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Contact:
Raissa Marks, 506-855-4144, raissa.marks@nben.ca
The NBEN’s Branch Out, Make Waves is a province-wide challenge that encourages youth and community groups to team up and take on tree-planting and shoreline clean-up conservation projects. Together, the groups from around the province planted 1254 trees and cleaned 20 hectares of shoreline!

While the challenge this year ended on October 21, you can still vote! 

Go to the challenge page and scroll down to the challenge submissions. Voting is as simple as clicking the upward arrow (^) on the challenges you want to vote for! Voting ends November 18th.

You can vote HERE!

Thank you for supporting youth and community conservation efforts!
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Do you ever stumble across a blue “protected natural area” sign when you are hiking in the woods? I do. And I always wonder what protected area I’m in. And whether I’m entering it, or leaving it.

So, what on earth is a protected area? Protected areas are preserves for nature and wildlife habitat. People can use them for recreation, like hiking, and, in most protected areas in NB, for fishing and hunting too. Industrial activities like forestry and mining are not allowed.

In New Brunswick, 4.7% of the land is currently protected areas. 4.7% sounds pretty good - until you take into account the fact that Canada has signed the international Convention on Biological Diversity and is committed to protecting 17% by 2020. Hmmm, that’s only 3 years away. And how do we stack up against the other provinces? Well, we are second to last, with only PEI trailing behind us.

To learn some tips from other provinces, three were invited to a workshop last February. Of the three, Alberta is in the lead with an impressive 14.4% of its land protected, Nova Scotia next with 12.16% and Quebec has 9.16%. New Brunswick is similar to Nova Scotia, about the same size and about half of the province is Crown land. Surely with all this Crown land in NB we can do our fair share to preserve nature and wildlife habitat for future generations. If they can do it Nova Scotia, we can too!

At the protected areas workshop, participants from conservation groups, universities, First Nations, government, municipalities and business generated new ideas to get New Brunswick to the international benchmark. Read the report of the workshop to find out more! Tell us what you think!

   

 
Congratulations to Jim Emberger for winning  the first  Beth McLaughlin Environmental Journalism Award from the Southeast Chapter of Conservation Council of NB. Jim won this award for reporting on the dangers of hydraulic fracturing. Well done!

Read the full article on NBASGA's website, here.

Blog Archives


This blog is for news and opinion pieces by staff.
The views expressed in these articles are the author’s personal opinion and not those of the NBEN or its member or associate groups.

Upcoming Events


NGO webinar on the Canadian Environmental Protection Act
Wed, Dec 13th, 2017


NBEN Holiday Reception
Wed, Dec 20th, 2017
Fredericton

ASCF-CRI Webinar: Jani Helminen and Tommi Linnansaari
Wed, Jan 10th, 2018

Action Alerts

Have your say on Draft Water Strategy!

Wednesday, 15 November 2017
by Conservation Council of New Brunswick
A Water Strategy for New Brunswick

On October 6, 2017, the department of Environment and Local Government released a draft water strategy for comments. The draft strategy is available on the government website. Comments can be submitted by email to: waterstrategy-strategiedeleau@gnb.ca or by mail to: Department of Environment and Local Government, Policy and Planning Division, P.O. Box 6000, Fredericton, N.B., E3B 5H1. Comments will be accepted until November 20, 2017.

In order to help groups with their submissions, the Conservation Council of New Brunswick, in cooperation with watershed groups, has put together key elements of a watershed strategy and a sample letter to send to the Department.

Summary​ ​of​ ​8​ ​Key​ ​Elements​ ​of​ ​a​ ​Strong​ ​Water​ ​Protection​ ​Strategy

New​ ​Brunswick​ ​deserves​ ​a​ ​water​ ​protection​ ​strategy​ ​that:
    1. is​​ ​​science-based;​ ​(involving​ ​baseline​ ​data,​ ​tracking​ ​and​ ​taking​ ​into​ ​consideration cumulative​ ​impacts,​ ​environmental​ ​flows)
    2. sets​ ​water​ ​quality​ ​standards​ ​within​ ​a​ ​working,​ ​legal​ ​mechanism;
    3. conserves​ ​all​ ​water​ ​within​ ​​watersheds​ ​including​ ​surface​ ​waters​ ​(lakes,​ ​streams,​ ​rivers) and​ ​groundwater,​ ​by​ ​developing​ ​good​ ​conservation​ ​plans,​ ​policies​ ​and​ ​practices,​ ​and uses​ ​the​ ​precautionary​ ​principle​ ​as​ ​a​ ​guiding,​ ​legally​ ​enforceable​ ​tool;
    4. protects​ ​our​ ​marine​ ​coastal​ ​areas​ ​in​ ​law;
    5. has​ ​a​ ​meaningful​ ​form​ ​of​ ​​co-governance​ ​with​ ​First​ ​Nations;
    6. includes​ ​the​ ​development,​ ​implementation​ ​and​ ​enforcement​ ​of​ ​watershed​ ​protection plans,​ ​developed​ ​in​ ​a​ ​transparent​ ​manner,​ ​involving​ ​government,​ ​businesses,​ ​watershed organizations,​ ​farmers,​ ​municipal​ ​officials,​ ​and​ ​citizens;
    7. is​ ​accountable,​ ​which​ ​includes​ ​ongoing​ ​monitoring​ ​and​ ​annual​ ​reporting​ ​to​ ​the​ ​public​ ​on the​ ​progress​ ​of​ ​goals​ ​and​ ​objectives​ ​outlined​ ​in​ ​the​ ​water​ ​protection​ ​strategy;​ ​and,
    8. is​​ ​enforceable​ ​through​ ​a​ ​modern​ ​legal​ ​framework
Sample Letter
 My name is ______, and I am writing to express my support for a strong Water Strategy in New Brunswick.

I live near ______ OR I live in ___________ watershed

Describe your favourite spot to fish/swim/paddle etc.

Share your favourite water memory.

Clean, healthy water is important to me because _____________.

Have you recently experienced a boil water order? Blue-green algae? Extreme weather? Describe what is of concern to you.

I applaud the provincial government for moving forward on its commitment to protecting our water; however I believe the draft strategy does not go far enough to ensure healthy water for my watershed.

We need a water protection strategy that (Insert one or multiple key elements).

I am afraid that if left unattended, my watershed will face ongoing and increasing treats from (pollution, wetland and coastal estuary loss, loss of adequate environmental flow to sustain aquatic life, and increasing climate change impacts such as floods, droughts, and high temperatures.)

Please protect my watershed by implementing a strong water protection strategy with modern legislation that (note key element(s)) to ensure the health of our water and people.

Thank you,
Your name.

For more information, visit the CCNB's website.

Call for nominations for the NBEN Awards - 2017

Monday, 31 July 2017
by Annika Chiasson
Every day people and environmental groups take action to protect and restore New Brunswick’s environment.  

Over this past year, who stands out in your mind? 

We invite you to nominate a group or individual deserving of one of the NBEN awards which will be presented in style at Eco-Confluence 2017.  Send an e-mail to nben@nben.ca describing your nominee’s work.  Nominees must be members or associates of the NBEN*.

Nomination deadline is September 13, 2017.

*Current NBEN Steering Committee members are not eligible for awards.
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