• CCNB partners to make Every Day Earth Day

    unnamed

    MEDIA RELEASE

    FREDERICTON — The Conservation Council of New Brunswick has partnered with Earth Day Canada to help New Brunswickers make eco-friendly choices this April 22 and beyond.

    The province's leading environmental organization will be supplying free materials to schools and teachers and providing event toolkits for groups or individuals looking to organize local events across New Brunswick.

    The Conservation Council is the official N.B. partner of Earth Day Canada and one of several groups collaborating on the campaign across the country.

    The theme of this year's celebration is 'Clean Your Commute,' encouraging Canadians to become VGPs — Very Green People — by embracing green transportation options on April 22.

    Other elements include the 'Earth Day Every Day Campaign.' On April 22, Canadians who signed up will receive an 'Earth Day Every Day' toolkit that will give them ideas for fun ways to reduce and track their environmental footprint over the course of the year.

    Organizers have also created a 2015 Earth Day Flag which will be signed by people from coast-to-coast who have committed to cutting their carbon emissions by 20 per cent by the year 2020. The flag will be presented during the International Climate Conference in Paris in December, re-creating the moment when a similar flag was presented at the U.N. Earth Summit in 1992.

    The Conservation Council will coordinate with New Brunswickers who want to sign the Earth Day Flag.

    Prizes are available for people who participate, post about, and share their Earth Day Canada activities.

    To receive free promotional materials, resources for teachers, event toolkits, or to arrange to sign the 2015 Earth Day Flag, contact Jon MacNeill, Communications Officer with the Conservation Council.
    -30-
  • CCNB presents its annual Milton F. Gregg Conservation Awards

    The NBEN congratulates the recipients of the annual Milton F. Gregg Conservation Awards presented by the CCNB on the 27th of April at the Spring into Action auction and awards evening.
    The award for lifetime achievement was presented posthumously to recognize the late Florian Levesque from Balmoral. Lawrence Wuest of Stanley received the award for environmental activism.  Post-Carbon Moncton was recognized for its organizational achievement and Betty Lizotte from Saint John was recognized for her volunteerism.
    http://www.conservationcouncil.ca/News/news04261201.aspx
  • CCNB releases interactive tool for finding out where the Energy East pipeline meets our waters


    FREDERICTON — The Conservation Council of New Brunswick has released a powerful tool that shows people just how close the proposed Energy East oil pipeline will be to their home, cottage or favourite fishing hole.

    The interactive Google Map allows users to see the nearly 300 points at which the oil pipeline will intersect rivers and streams in New Brunswick. It was generated using Google Earth Pro and documents from TransCanada Corporation, the North American oil and gas giant proposing to build the 4,600-kilometre Energy East oil pipeline from the tarsands in Alberta to export terminals in Quebec and Saint John.

    “It’s a really neat tool,” said Stephanie Merrill, Freshwater Protection Program Coordinator for the Conservation Council of New Brunswick. “Whenever someone asks about the pipeline, I can bring up the map on my iPad and say, ‘there’s the route, and that’s how close your family cottage is to it.’ Or, ‘there’s the pipeline slicing through the river you’ve fished for years.”

    The Conservation Council is calling on New Brunswickers to use the tool and see how the proposed pipeline will affect them. We’re encouraging people to share stories of their favourite fishing holes, hunting grounds, family cottages or homesteads that are in the pipeline’s path.  

    View the mapon our website.

    -30-
  • CCNB: Cancer classification warrants ban on widely-used herbicide


    unnamed


    CCNB: Cancer classification warrants ban on widely-used herbicide


    FREDERICTON —  A herbicide sprayed yearly and in large quantities on New Brunswick forests was recently classified as a probable cancer-causing chemical by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), an arm of the World Health Organization. Thedecision was published in the journal,Lancet Oncology. Glyphosate, sold under various trade names including Roundup, Vision, and Vision Max, is a broad-spectrum weedkiller used in agriculture, silviculture, recreational areas and on lawns. Globally, it is the highest-volume herbicide in use.

    The IARC panel of 17 experts from 11 countries classified glyphosateas a probable carcinogen based on evidence in human and animal studies. Several studies, including one inCanada, have found a link between occupational exposure to glyphosate and increased risk of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    "Glyphosate can be absorbed into the body and has been detected in the blood and urine of workers handling the chemical,” says Inka Milewski, science advisor for the Conservation Council of New Brunswick. "Glyphosate causes cancer by damaging chromosomes (DNA) which can result in mutations that lead to cancer. But it is not only workers that are affected. The IARC experts cite a2009 study that found chromosomal damage in residents of several communities after aerial glyphosate spraying."

    Herbicides have been used on New Brunswick forests since the 1970s when pulp and paper companies were first permitted to clearcut natural forest and replace it with plantations. About 13,000 hectares of Crown forest are sprayed each year in the province. Spraying is done by helicopter for about 40 days between August and September, covering roughly 25 per cent of the softwood land cut each year.

    The Conservation Council is calling for a ban on glyphosate use in New Brunswick’s Crown forest. "Health policy and regulations lag way behind the known science of many of the pollutants in our environment. There are plenty of examples where regulators have waited too long before acting to protect public health. Lead, DDT, radon, dioxin and cigarette smoke come to mind," says Milewski.

    Tracy Glynn, forest campaign director for the Conservation Council, says it's time for New Brunswick to ban aerial herbicide spraying in forests. "Quebec banned the use of glyphosate in forestry in 2001 and replaced herbicide use with thinning crews.Nova Scotia recently abandoned the public funding of herbicide spraying of their forest and is moving toward FSC certification of their forest, which would mean no more herbicides in their woods. But here in New Brunswick, we continue to fund silviculture on Crown land that includes spraying, which according to data from Natural Resources Canada, can cost the province about $1,000/ha," says Glynn.

    Three petitions, signed by thousands of New Brunswickers, against herbicide spraying in the forest have been tabled in the New Brunswick Legislature in just over a decade, the most recent in 2011. Kent County residents have recently risked arrest and are facing hefty fines for trying to stop the herbicide spraying of their woods.

    “Creating good jobs and protecting our health and the health of our forest is very important to New Brunswickers,” says Glynn. “Following in our neighbour’s footsteps by using thinning crews instead of chemicals that have been connected to cancer is just good common sense.”

    -30-
  • CCNB's Lois Corbett to speak at Act on Climate Forum

    unnamed


    MEDIA RELEASE


    FREDERICTON — Lois Corbett, Executive Director of the Conservation Council of New Brunswick, will talk about ways governments can protect our climate while creating prosperous communities during the Act on Climate Forum in Quebec City this weekend.

    Corbett is one of several notable speakers participating in the Act on Climate Forum on Sunday, April 12 in Quebec City. The forum follows the Act on Climate March being organized on April 11, when Canadians from coast-to-coast will gather to show their support for government action on climate protection.

    Later in the week, some of Canada’s premiers, including New Brunswick Premier Brian Gallant, will be in Quebec City for a special meeting on climate change. The march and forum are intended to show leaders how serious Canadians are about coming up with climate solutions in the lead up to the international climate talks in Paris later this year.

    “It’s all about solutions for that week in Quebec City,” says Corbett, who will speak on federal and provincial laws and policies at the forum. "Premiers agreeing to act together to manage carbon pollution at home and invest in the new jobs found in clean energy and improved energy efficiency will send a strong signal that they, like most Canadians, respect that there is a limit to the amount of carbon pollution the atmosphere can take.”

    Corbett, an expert in public policy, will talk about ways our leaders can move fairly and effectively toward an economy that doesn’t depend on fossil fuels.

    Other speakers of the Act on Climate Forum include representatives from Canadian universities, the Canadian Labour Congress, labour unions, First Nations, citizen groups and environmental organizations such as the David Suzuki Foundation and Blue Green Canada, among others.

    The forum aims to strengthen collaboration between groups across Canada who are working to tackle climate change.

    Corbett will be available to media in New Brunswick for on-the-street interviews from Quebec City during the March on Saturday or following the Forum on Sunday.

  • Congratulations Jim Emberger!

    Congratulations to Jim Emberger for winning  the first  Beth McLaughlin Environmental Journalism Award from the Southeast Chapter of Conservation Council of NB. Jim won this award for reporting on the dangers of hydraulic fracturing. Well done!

    Read the full article on NBASGA's website, here.
  • Environmental Network Celebrates 25 Years

    For immediate release
    November 22, 2016
    cake

    Fredericton – The New Brunswick Environmental Network celebrated its 25th anniversary over the weekend. During the celebration, special recognition was given to seven groups that have been members of the network for 25 years: Atlantic Salmon Federation, Vertige at Mathieu-Martin High School, Conservation Council of New Brunswick, Grand Manan Whale and Seabird Research Station, Nature NB, Nature Trust of New Brunswick, and Trees International.

    There are now 100 citizen-based environmental groups from across New Brunswick in the Network. “It was a double milestone,” said Raissa Marks, Executive Director of the NBEN. “It was perfectly fitting to approve the membership of our 100th group during the 25th anniversary event.”

    “Nature NB is excited to have been part of the NBEN for 25 years,” said Vanessa Roy-McDougall, Executive Director of Nature NB. “The NBEN's diligent work over the years has allowed us to connect with other environmental groups and has made our efforts to conserve New Brunswick's natural heritage even stronger."

    Lois Corbett, Executive Director of the Conservation Council of New Brunswick, added that her group is “...proud to have been part of NBEN for 25 years. The Network's groups and their members, including the Conservation Council, represent citizens from all over the province and by working together, we've become a strong united voice for clean water and air and for a thriving, greener economy.”

    Youth environmental groups have always been an important part of the Network, as explained by Mylène Chavarie of Vertige at Mathieu-Martin High School, “Vertige is extremely proud to be part of the NBEN. The resources provided by the Network have been useful to us over the course of the last 25 years. Our committee is honoured to have been part of the NBEN since the beginning.”

    Laurie Murison, of the Grand Manan Whale & Seabird Research Station, reflected back on the last 25 years. “We were happy to join a network of New Brunswick environmental groups 25 years ago. At that time, communication among groups was limited to phone calls, mail outs, or meetings. The need to connect with others, and the chance to learn new skills, was beneficial and desirable. The development of a strong network in New Brunswick over the years with increased membership has strengthened our resolve to remain a member.”

    The 25th anniversary celebration, held in Fredericton on Saturday November 19, was attended by over 100 people representing 53 environmental groups from around the province.

    The Network’s mandate is to improve communication and co-operation among environmental groups and between these groups, government, and other sectors.

    -30-

    Contact:
    Raissa Marks, 506-855-4144, raissa.marks@nben.ca
  • New Brunswickers want leaders to act now on climate protection

    unnamed


    MEDIA RELEASE


    FREDERICTON — A new poll shows New Brunswickers want their government leaders to act now to protect the climate.

    Polling determined an overwhelming majority of New Brunswickers — a margin of nearly 8 to 1 — believe we should be global leaders in protecting the climate by reducing our energy consumption.

    The national telephone poll was conducted in the last half of March, just weeks before several Canadian premiers, including New Brunswick Premier Brian Gallant, are gathering in Quebec City for a special meeting on climate change.

    The poll also shows New Brunswickers don’t buy into the idea that just because a jurisdiction is small it doesn’t have to take as much action to curb climate change. A majority of New Brunswickers rejected the notion that Canada’s efforts on climate change should be minimal given our country’s total emissions as compared to other polluters such as the U.S. or China.

    Instead, New Brunswickers want swift action on climate protection from their leaders. Polling shows 73.3 per cent of people from the province want to see a plan for creating jobs in the renewable energy sector, with 70.2 per cent calling for a promise to legally enforce a cap or limits to carbon pollution. Nearly 70 per cent of New Brunswickers want a commitment to phase out coal, oil and gas and replace them with renewable energy sources.

    The national random sample telephone poll involved participation from 3,040 Canadians and was conducted for Climate Action Network Canada by Oracle Research Limited between March 12 to 30. The margin of error for the total 3040-person survey is +/- 1.78%, 19/20 times. See full results here.

    Other results related to New Brunswick:

    • 78.7 per cent of New Brunswickers see curbing climate change as a moral issue, saying they believe they are morally obligated to reduce carbon pollution in their daily lives;

    • 63.5 per cent of New Brunswickers disagree with the notion that cheap and accessible energy are more important than the negative impacts they have on the environment;

    • 80 per cent of New Brunswickers want a say in decision-making around energy projects.
  • Step by Step: How to apply to have a say on Energy East

    Slogging through the National Energy Board’s process can feel about as thick and gooped-up as the bitumen that TransCanada is proposing to push through its Energy East pipeline. The Conservation Council has put together a Step by Step Guide for getting through the application process to have a say on the proposed Energy East oil pipeline. 

    New Brunswickers who will be affected by this project and those with specialized knowledge about how the oil pipeline could affect our lands, drinking water, rivers, the Bay of Fundy, Right Whale, public health and safety have a say in this process. However, you must apply and describe in fewer than 500 words how you will be directly affected or what specialized knowledge that you have in order for the National Energy Board to accept a letter from you or hear comments from you at a hearing in the future. More information here.

    Join or host an application party! In Fredericton, the Conservation Council, Council of Canadians Fredericton Chapter and 350.org are hosting an application party on Monday, Feb. 16 at 6:00pm at Conserver House, 180 Saint John St. There will be pizza!

    Watch/share our video on applying to be heard on Energy East. You can also share this update.

    The deadline to apply to participate is March 3, 2015. Apply to the NEB today!

    If you have any questions, contact us. We can walk you through it.
  • Throwing darts at map won't cut it: CCNB says TransCanada has moral duty to withdraw pipeline application


    unnamed


    Throwing darts at map won't cut it: CCNB says TransCanada has moral duty to withdraw pipeline application

                                                                MEDIA RELEASE

    FREDERICTON — TransCanada Corporation has a moral responsibility to withdraw its Energy East project from the national review process now that significant changes have been made to the original oil pipeline proposal, says the Conservation Council of New Brunswick.

    On Thursday, April 2, TransCanada announced it had cancelled plans to build an export terminal in Cacouna, Que., due to the negative effects it would have on a nearby nursing ground for the endangered Beluga whale.

    The company said it is still looking at other potential terminal sites in Quebec and noted it would file any amendments to its application to the National Energy Board between October and December of this year.

    The application process for the public to participate in the review of Energy East closed on March 17. Once it has received all necessary documents from the company, the National Energy Board will have 15 months to make a decision on the project.

    The Conservation Council says TransCanada has a moral duty toward Canadians to act responsibly by withdrawing its project application because:
     

    • Too many details are still up in the air for the National Energy Board to make a responsible decision in its review — throwing a dart at a map of Canada’s export terminals won’t cut it;
       

    • The company has demonstrated poor business planning for a project of this scale, failing to file its original application in both official languages, and significantly changing the scope of the project after the regulatory review process has already begun;
       

    • It is unfair to proceed with the project given how little is known about what this change will mean for the Bay of Fundy, including the impact on fishers and tourism operators whose livelihood depends on the pristine condition of the bay, and the impact on the many animals that frequent the bay, including the North Atlantic Right whale, one of the top 10 most endangered whales on the planet.

    “There are too many unknowns around this project, especially when it comes to the Bay of Fundy,” said Matt Abbott, Fundy Baykeeper with the Conservation Council of New Brunswick.

    “There are a lot of dedicated people in fisheries, NGOs and government working to protect and improve the coastal waters that are at the base of our economy and culture here in New Brunswick. It just wouldn’t be responsible or fair of TransCanada to string our coastal communities and industries along with an incomplete, ill-thought-out plan."