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Bringing communities and schools together, one tree planting at a time!

Monday, 25 September 2017
by Pascale Léa Ouellette
For immediate release
Date: September 18th, 2017

Dundas, NB - This past Friday, the New Brunswick Environmental Network in collaboration with École Notre-Dame and the Pays de Cocagne Sustainable Development Group launched the 2017 Branch Out, Make Waves challenge at École Notre-Dame.

“Branch Out, Make Waves” challenges youth and community groups to work together in their local community to help conserve New Brunswick landscapes and shorelines. Over 400 young New Brunswickers participated last year, together planting 1254 trees and cleaning 20 hectares of shoreline!

“This is a great opportunity for youth to contribute to conservation and to create partnerships with environmental groups in their community. I look forward to the 2017 challenge and what it will bring,” said Pascale Ouellette, Education and Outreach Programs Coordinator with the New Brunswick Environmental Network.

The launch on the 15th was also one of the 150 tree planting events across the country in 2017 to commemorate Canada’s 150th. This project is made possible in part by the Government of Canada, Tree Canada, the EcoAction Community Funding Program, UNI Coopération FInancière, and the many dedicated volunteers across the province.
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Contact Person:
Pascale Ouellette, Education and Outreach Programs Coordinator, NBEN
Tel: 506-855-4144
Email: nben@nben.ca

 
image1
Tree Canada representative, Fabrice Parisi, speaking on Tree Canada’s role in tree planting events through Canada.

 image2
Students of École Notre-Dame welcoming ceremony attendees.

Check it out: Every Living Thing – Experiencing a bioblitz

Wednesday, 05 April 2017
by Raissa Marks
Header 1 blue owl

The documentary film, Every Living Thing -­ experiencing a bioblitz, will take you on an amazing journey of what it's like to spend four weeks over two summers exploring all aspects of nature – fish, insects, plants, fungi, reptiles, amphibians and mammals - that live in NB’s own Grand Lake Protected Natural Area.

Celebrate the UN Decade of Biodiversity – host a film screening in your community!

Unlike reality TV, this documentary film features real scientists speaking about real issues affecting real people living in real communities.

Every Living Thing was produced by NB-based company, Flower Power Production, in collaboration with the New Brunswick Museum's BiotaNB program.  BiotaNB is a 20-year biodiversity research project to identify and catalogue as many species in the province of New Brunswick, before human encroachment and climate change intensifies.  The NBEN is partnering with Flower Power Production to promote community film screenings of this film across Canada. 

News From Groups

The wonder of summer learning provided all year long

Thursday, 21 September 2017
by Jon MacNeill
Op-ed by Nadine Ives

There is nothing quite like that back-to-school feeling.


But what if you could capture the freedom of summer days, the exploration of experimenting and learning outside, year round?

New Brunswick is home to a dedicated and innovative group of outdoor nature educators who know how to teach, outside.

The educators behind the Great Minds Think Outside program of the New Brunswick Environmental Network (NBEN) come from a broad range of backgrounds and disciplines, and they know their stuff. These educators know, for example, that a child who learns outside reaps benefits in physical, mental, emotional, and social development, in addition to improved academic outcomes. Math? Plot a graph of the plants found in different areas of the playground. Group objects found in nature according to colour, shape and texture.

Science and climate change? Measure temperature, rain, and snowfall and track changes over time.  Observe the life cycle of frogs in a local wetland.

Literacy? Write a story imagining a day in the life of a bug, or a tree. Use adjectives to describe the clouds.

Sometimes those who struggle in the classroom blossom when given opportunities to learn outside - and pretty well everyone loves exploring outdoors.

So it is good news that as teachers, parents and students across the province head back to class for another school year, our team of outdoor nature educators is gearing up for another season of helping teachers connect their students to the wealth of learning opportunities just outside their classroom walls. After all, in New Brunswick, nature is never far from our doorstep.

Since 2015, the Great Minds Think Outside team has visited more than 40 schools across the province to help teachers make lessons leap off the page and come alive before students' eyes in the outdoors.

The training sessions are activity-filled opportunities for teachers to experience for themselves the excitement of taking curriculum outside to see how effective it is for making memories full of important learning moments that will stay with children for years.

The activities can be adapted for any subject area, tying memorable hands-on experiential learning opportunities to the important skills and development goals outlined in the provincial curriculum. As one teacher from Sackville's Salem Elementary School said after taking the training, "this is the future of education." Many teachers who've participated in Great Minds Think Outside sessions say it is a fantastic way to reach kids who just learn better by doing, while reinforcing lessons learned previously inside the classroom. One teacher from a recent session put it best: "The more senses involved, the more movement and positive experiences, the better the learning." After taking a lesson outside, students return to the classroom with more focus and creativity, stronger recall and memory, and are better at problem-solving and working cooperatively with classmates. And it's not just the children who benefit. Teaching outside gives teachers a renewed enthusiasm for their work and promotes more innovative teaching strategies. A teacher who takes the class outside for a science lesson suddenly starts seeing ways to connect it to math, language arts, social studies and more. Talk to your child's teacher about inviting the Great Minds Think Outside team to your school. You can book a session by contacting Pascale Ouellette, the Education and Outreach Programs Coordinator with the New Brunswick Environmental Network, at 506-855-4144 or by emailing nben@nben.ca. Learn more about the program at www.nben.ca/greatminds.

Let's make sure that this year, at more and more schools across the province, going back to class does not mean going back inside!

Nadine I
ves, The Learning Outside Coordinator for the Conservation Council of New Brunswick and a founding member of the New Brunswick Environmental Network's Great Minds Think Outside program.


Call for Volunteers: Nature Trust of New Brunswick Hosting Trail Maintenance Days on Sunday, September 3rd

Thursday, 31 August 2017
by Nature Trust of New Brunswick
The Nature Trust of New Brunswick is recruiting more volunteers to help steward the Caughey-Taylor Nature Preserve near St. Andrews and the Clark Gregory Nature Preserve on Deer Island and will be training volunteers this Sunday, September 3rd.

Caughey-Taylor Event: This Caughey-Taylor with a focus on trail maintenance and bird monitoring. Volunteers will meet in the new parking lot at the entrance to the Taggart’s Marsh and Chickahominey Mountain Trail.

 

WHEN: Sunday, Sept. 3rd, 2017 from 9 am to 12 pm.

 

WHERE: Caughey-Taylor Nature Preserve, Bocabec, near St. Andrews, NB.

 

Clark Gregory Event: The Friends of Clark Gregory Nature Preserve land stewards will be gathering to meet new volunteers and complete trail work at the nature preserve. Volunteers will meet at the parking area at the top of the entrance road to the northern parcel of the preserve.

WHEN: Sunday, Sept. 3rd, 2017 from 1:30 pm to 4 pm.

 

WHERE: Clark Gregory Nature Preserve, Deer Island, NB.

 

RSVP: For more info and to RSVP, please contact Richelle at richelle.martin@ntnb.org or 506-453-4886.

Green Jobs

Employment Opportunity - Conservation Assistant

Thursday, 14 September 2017
by Roberta Clowater, Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society - New Brunswick Chapter
The Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society - New Brunswick Chapter (CPAWS NB) is the provincial branch of a national conservation charity. We encourage the protection of our province’s wild ecosystems in protected areas, and work to ensure that nature comes first in parks management. CPAWS NB is looking for an enthusiastic self-starter to help develop and promote protected areas campaigns for the land and ocean in New Brunswick. The successful candidate will be someone who can effectively work independently with little supervision, and who is able to quickly identify solutions to problems.

Duties
If you are the successful applicant, you will develop your skills in communicating nature conservation issues to the public, and building relationships to advance protected areas campaigns. The Conservation Assistant’s duties will include, but not be limited to, the following:
a) Undertaking research to contribute to communications materials regarding our ocean conservation, wilderness conservation and park management work;
b) Writing content for and designing materials for our educational and awareness programs;
c) Promoting, scheduling and leading our Watch Your Paws educational program (in English and French) in schools and with youth groups;
d) Organizing, promoting and attending meetings, outdoor activities and events with volunteers, community organizations, and community leaders in various parts of New Brunswick;
e) Helping to coordinate the activities of summer students and volunteers;
f) Writing reports on research findings, taking minutes at meetings, and writing briefing notes, backgrounders, content for newsletters, websites and social media;
g) Assisting with grant proposals and other fundraising activities.

The successful applicant:
a) Has a post-secondary degree from a college or university, from any of these fields: Environmental Studies, Natural Sciences, Environmental Policy, Environmental Education or a related field with an interest in working in the conservation sector;
b) Is currently under-employed and living in New Brunswick, or willing to relocate to New Brunswick;
c) Has experience and interest in nature conservation issues, communicating with the public, volunteer management or community outreach;
d) Has strong research and writing skills;
e) Has proficiency with Word, Publisher, Excel, PowerPoint and/or other similar software, and well-developed communications skills online, with various social media;
f) Has exceptional organizational skills and ability to track and report on the details of various aspects of projects;
g) Has proven leadership abilities, ability to take initiative, ability to work independently with limited supervision and to develop own work plan to achieve assigned tasks;
h) Has a valid New Brunswick driver’s license, and the ability to travel throughout New Brunswick;
i) Has Canadian citizenship, permanent resident status or has been granted refugee status in Canada and is legally entitled to work in New Brunswick.
j) The ability to communicate in both English and French are strong assets for this position.

This position will be based out of Fredericton, with some travel throughout New Brunswick. The position will be 30-37.5 hours per week, for at least 6 months, with the potential for extension.

To apply for this position, please submit a resume and cover letter, describing how you meet the qualifications for this position. We require the names and contact information of three professional references. Please, no phone calls or drop-ins. Please apply, by email only, before September 21, 2017 to: rclowater[at]cpaws.org (replace at with the symbol).

For more information about CPAWS NB, please visit our web site: www.cpawsnb.org   


Action Alerts

Call for nominations for the NBEN Awards - 2017

Monday, 31 July 2017
by Annika Chiasson
Every day people and environmental groups take action to protect and restore New Brunswick’s environment.  

Over this past year, who stands out in your mind? 

We invite you to nominate a group or individual deserving of one of the NBEN awards which will be presented in style at Eco-Confluence 2017.  Send an e-mail to nben@nben.ca describing your nominee’s work.  Nominees must be members or associates of the NBEN*.

Nomination deadline is September 13, 2017.

*Current NBEN Steering Committee members are not eligible for awards.

Resquest for letters of support: Proposed name restoration for the Wolastoq

Sunday, 30 April 2017
by Alma
 The Wolastoq Grand Council supports our YOUTH GROUPS on their proposal for changing the name of the Saint John River, back to it’s original and proper name; Wolastoq (the beautiful & bountiful river ). We see this as a good place to begin the process of implementing the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples; which was strongly recommended by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission.  

Proposed Name Restoration: 
  • The name Saint John River back to it’s original indigenous name -  Wolastoq
Purpose: 
  • Wolastoq; (the beautiful river) is the original Indigenous name of the River.
  • Wolastoq is the name sake for the real identity and unique nationality of our People; the Wolastoqiyik.  Respecting the rights of Wolastoqiyik.
  • Scientific studies have now confirmed, what our people have always known; “that water has memory”.    This river will remember its original name.   
  • This deed would begin a process for reconciliation with a show of goodwill on the part of the Government of New Brunswick, and would;
  • Create opportunities for discussions and engagement around indigenous issues.
  • Wolastoqiyik have a right to retain their own names for communities, places and persons. 

The Wolastoq Grand Council is requesting support letters from our Allies; as individuals, organizations, and/or Groups.  For more information, contact Alma Brooks, 506-478-1256, almabrooks.26@outlook.com

Please send support letters to the following addresses:

The Wolastoq Grand Council,
Grand Chief; Ron Tremblay
50 Maliseet Drive
Fredericton, NB, E3A 2V9


David Coon
Office of the Green Party Leader
P.O. Box 6000
Fredericton, NB, E3B 5H1

Additional Information

  1. Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada
Carolyn Bennett; Minister of Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada; has assured the Wolastoq Grand Council in writing that; - “Canada is committed to a renewed nation to nation relationship with indigenous peoples based on the recognition of rights, respect, cooperation and partnership.”   Carolyn Bennett also stated that ; - “Achieving full reconciliation between indigenous and non-indigenous people in Canada is at the heart of Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada’s mandate, and that the government of “Canada will engage with Indigenous peoples, provinces, territories, and Canadians on how to implement the Declaration in accordance with Canada’s Constitution”.

  1. Andrea Bear-Nicholas
As described in a 2011 article by Andrea Bear-Nicholas, Maliseet historian:  
  1. The first step in the dispossession for the indigenous peoples in the Maritimes began in earnest immediately after the British capture of the French fort at Louisbourg in 1758.   Where place names and names of First Nations in the entire region had been inscribed on earlier maps; both would soon be erased by colonial cartographers in a process described by J. B. Harley as cartographic colonialism.  The justifications for these erasures was found in the doctrine of discovery.   
  2. The second step in the dispossession of indigenous peoples in Nova Scotia began immediately after signing of the Treaty of 1760 by Passamaquoddy and Maliseet Leaders, and later the signing of the Mascarene Treaty.   Although there was no surrender of any lands in either of these Treaties; 1.5 million acres of Maliseet land which outlawed the surveying and expropriation of lands not yet ceded by the indigenous inhabitants or purchased by the Crown.    


  3. United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples
The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples:   Articles 1, 2, 6, & 13   support and provide a guide for the implementation leading to reconciliation.

As a distinct ‘people,’ we have a right to our accurate identity and nationality.
  • Indigenous Peoples have the right to the full enjoyment as a collective or as individuals of all human rights and fundamental freedoms as recognized in the Charter of the United Nations, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and international human rights law. 
  • Indigenous peoples and individuals are free and equal to all other peoples and individuals and have the right to be free from any kind of discrimination, in the exercise of their rights, in particular that based on their indigenous origin and identity. 
  • Every indigenous individual has the right to their own nationality. 
  • Indigenous people have a right to retain their own names for communities, places and persons.  “States shall take effective measures to ensure that this right is protected”.

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